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Quantum Leap

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2010 | By Steve Chawkins
In most towns, a local theater troupe might boost ticket sales by having the mayor or the high school football coach take small parts in, say, "Annie Get Your Gun!" In Santa Barbara, where the university is home to five Nobel laureates, the Ensemble Theatre Company has rejiggered the formula: On Sunday, two Nobel Prize-winning physicists will portray two other Nobel Prize-winning physicists in a reading from a play that revolves around quantum mechanics and the development of nuclear weapons.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
It's been 20 years since Scott Bakula was last nominated for an Emmy, for his role as time-traveling quantum physicist Sam Beckett in the much-beloved NBC drama “Quantum Leap.” He certainly wasn't expecting the surprise call he received Thursday morning, telling him he'd earned a nod for his supporting role in “Behind the Candelabra.” Bakula was up early to take his youngest son to intensive ballet camp when he got a call from his publicist....
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1993 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
"Quantum Leap" leaped off the air on a winning note Wednesday with an audience that more than doubled its average rating for the season. According to figures released Thursday by the A.C. Nielsen Co., the finale for NBC's time-traveling series was seen in nearly 13 million households at 10 p.m., nipping "48 Hours" on CBS and easily outdistancing Kathie Lee Gifford's special on ABC. In its regular time slot of 8 p.m.
WORLD
December 10, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
By agreeing to knit their nations closer together on fiscal and economic policy, Europe's leaders are writing a potentially momentous new chapter in the continent's drive toward political integration. But at the end of a two-day summit in Brussels on Friday, it was unclear whether the enforced austerity demanded by France and Germany would help revive Europe's weakest economies, or condemn them to a cycle of deepening recession. And the chorus of oui , ja and si at the summit was punctuated by a resounding "no" from Britain, laying bare the widening rift between one of the region's biggest players and its neighbors on the European mainland.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1989 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Imagine it: A male time traveler who each week occupies a different body, surfacing as a blind concert pianist or a rabbi or a woman or an understudy to the lead in "The Man of La Mancha." Talk about reaching for the unreachable star. That is exactly what Sam Beckett does each week on "Quantum Leap," the NBC hour (10 p.m. Wednesdays on Channels 4, 36 and 39) that ranks among the boldest, freshest and most-entertaining dramatic series on TV.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1991 | STEVEN HERBERT
"Quantum Leap," which has seen its ratings increase by 58% since returning to the NBC schedule March 6, has been renewed for a fourth season, the network announced Friday. The fantasy drama, in which Scott Bakula stars as time-traveling scientist Sam Beckett, has averaged a 12.3 Nielsen rating (about 11.4 million households) in its four most recent telecasts. Also receiving renewal notices Friday were NBC's "Law & Order," and ABC's "Doogie Howser, M.D."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1989 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Times Staff Writer
"I said: 'I'm going to pitch an idea that's going to scare the hell out of you,' " writer-producer Don Bellisario recalled, reminiscing about a meeting many months ago with NBC Entertainment President Brandon Tartikoff, who wanted him to create a TV series for the network. "And then I pitched 'Quantum Leap.'
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1997 | STEPHAN FORTES, NEWSDAY
John Singleton lies stretched on a couch in a luxurious Park Avenue hotel suite, tired (and mildly cranky) from doing back-to-back interviews. Still, it's a good kind of tired, the kind you feel after you've done well in a marathon. And marathon is as good a way as any to describe his latest film, "Rosewood," a historical piece with a large cast and a scope beyond anything Singleton has done in the past.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1991 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Baby Talk," the ABC comedy based on the hit film "Look Who's Talking," will finally debut on Friday, March 8, at 8:30 p.m. Originally scheduled to premiere last September as part of ABC's starting fall lineup, production was delayed when the sitcom's star, Connie Sellecca, departed after a dispute with the producers and Columbia Pictures Television. Her role was subsequently recast with Julia Duffy, formerly of "Newhart." Tony Danza stars as the voice of the baby.
SPORTS
April 16, 1998 | MICHAEL LAZARUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Hart High boys' swimming team didn't miss Anthony Ervin much when he competed in two national meets. The Indians, one of the top teams in Southern Section Division II, had little trouble defeating Valencia and Burroughs in Foothill League meets. And they would have managed without him Wednesday afternoon against Canyon at North Oaks Park. Even without another top standout--junior Ryan Parmenter was missing because of illness--Hart won every event in a 133-32 victory.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2010
Jane Smiley, the California author of a dozen wildly different books, tackles half a century of events in the life of Margaret Early, a plain girl who gets married off to an eccentric scientist, in "Private Life." The pair move to San Francisco, where they suffer a series of internal and external disasters, but the knowledge that Margaret has married a madman is what keeps the pages turning. The Washington Post has called "Private Life" a "quantum leap" for this already accomplished writer, who will sign her latest work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2010 | By Steve Chawkins
In most towns, a local theater troupe might boost ticket sales by having the mayor or the high school football coach take small parts in, say, "Annie Get Your Gun!" In Santa Barbara, where the university is home to five Nobel laureates, the Ensemble Theatre Company has rejiggered the formula: On Sunday, two Nobel Prize-winning physicists will portray two other Nobel Prize-winning physicists in a reading from a play that revolves around quantum mechanics and the development of nuclear weapons.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2010 | By Jon Caramanica
The most shocking thing about the sweatiest recent sex scene on television wasn't that it ended, um, prematurely, nor that it resulted, indirectly, in a black eye. It's that it involved Ray Romano. Hearing Romano -- his character, Joe Tranelli, actually -- narrate this encounter, from his first post-divorce date, has been one of the many uncomfortable pleasures of "Men of a Certain Age" (TNT, 10 p.m. Mondays), honest about disappointment in a way uncommon for television. Unlike, say, "Cougar Town," which tackles middle age with hysteria and a series of blunt-force punch lines, "Men of a Certain Age" has far more in common with "thirtysomething": slow, even-keeled, interested in detail.
WORLD
November 20, 2008 | Associated Press
Mediators succeeded Wednesday in getting direct talks going between Russia and Georgia, pressing the two neighbors to resolve security and refugee issues from their August war. Johan Verbeke, special U.N. envoy for Georgia, said the sides had agreed on methods to demarcate borders and had begun work on security issues and the return of refugees. "I'd call this a quantum leap," Verbeke said. "All of the delegations did speak, all of the delegations listened."
NATIONAL
November 16, 2008 | Michael Eric Dyson
By any measure, this is a monumental day in our nation's history. African Americans are rightly proud. The brutal facts of black existence -- slavery, segregation and the stunting of social and political ambition -- have dashed the hopes of black progress time and again. The election of Barack Obama symbolizes the resurrection of hope and the restoration of belief in a country that has often failed to treat its black citizens as kin. We should not be seduced by the notion that Obama's presidency signals the end of racism, the civil rights movement, the struggle for black equality or the careers of Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton.
OPINION
November 5, 2008 | Michael Eric Dyson, Michael Eric Dyson, a professor of sociology at Georgetown University, is the author of many books, including "Holler If You Hear Me," "Is Bill Cosby Right?" and "I May Not Get There With You: The True Martin Luther King Jr."
More than half a century ago, Langston Hughes captured the debilitating divide in the destinies of white and black children in his poem "Children's Rhymes": "By what sends / the white kids / I ain't sent: / I know I can't / be President." Forty-six years after Hughes, rapper Tupac echoed that declaration: "And though it seems heaven sent / We ain't ready to have a black president."
NEWS
July 15, 1990 | Daniel Cerone
It happens, every so often, that an actor comes upon a role that permits him to explore a strange new life. Dustin Hoffman put on a bra for "Tootsie." Daniel Day-Lewis was born with cerebral palsy in "My Left Foot." Tom Cruise lost the use of his legs in "Born on the Fourth of July." For some actors, such choice roles come once in a lifetime. For Scott Bakula, they come along about once a week. In the NBC series "Quantum Leap," which is in reruns on Wednesday nights at 10 p.m.
WORLD
November 20, 2008 | Associated Press
Mediators succeeded Wednesday in getting direct talks going between Russia and Georgia, pressing the two neighbors to resolve security and refugee issues from their August war. Johan Verbeke, special U.N. envoy for Georgia, said the sides had agreed on methods to demarcate borders and had begun work on security issues and the return of refugees. "I'd call this a quantum leap," Verbeke said. "All of the delegations did speak, all of the delegations listened."
REAL ESTATE
September 23, 2007 | Ruth Ryon, Times Staff Writer
IN the mid-'90s, after Scott Bakula had starred for five years as time traveler Sam Beckett in the TV series "Quantum Leap," the actor and avid gardener set down his hoe and listed his home in Ojai. "It breaks my heart to sell it," he said then of his retreat, "but sometimes you have to do what you have to do." He put the five-bedroom house, which he had built, on the market at close to $1.8 million. Now the home is for sale again, and the current sellers are asking nearly $4.3 million.
SCIENCE
June 19, 2004 | Eric D. Tytell, Times Staff Writer
Austrian and American scientists have for the first time demonstrated practical quantum teleportation -- a technique that could make possible extraordinarily powerful quantum computers -- according to two studies published in the journal Nature on Thursday. Groups at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder, Colo.
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