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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1997
A state appellate court this week threw out a lawsuit that has pitted El Monte against Arcadia and an Orange County business for more than 10 years. A 1995 Superior Court ruling had put a halt to plans by Rodeffer Investment Inc. to fill a rock quarry on a piece of land that is adjacent to El Monte but owned by Arcadia. Arcadia long ago gave Rodeffer Investment the green light to fill the 160-foot-deep quarry, but El Monte feared such a plan would increase traffic and pollution.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
Christopher McQuarrie, a regular Tom Cruise collaborator, will direct the star in the fifth "Mission: Impossible" movie, both actor and director announced via Twitter on Monday. "Mission: Accepted" McQuarrie tweeted, which quickly got a retweet from Cruise trumpeting, "It's Confirmed!" McQuarrie, who won an Oscar for his 1995 "The Usual Suspects" screenplay, has a professional history with Cruise -- he wrote and produced Cruise's 2008 historical drama "Valkyrie," directed him in last year's modestly successful crime film "Jack Reacher" and adapted the novel "All You Need Is Kill" by Hiroshi Sakurazaka for Cruise's upcoming action movie "Edge of Tomorrow," which the two promoted together at Comic-Con International in San Diego last month.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The Shasta Lake City Council said it won't hire a lawyer to fight a proposed asphalt plant and quarry -- at least for now. Dozens of residents complained about the project at a council meeting Tuesday, saying that they want city officials to challenge the environmental impact report of the Goat Ranch Quarry. Council members agreed that the report is flawed but said they would wait to see if Shasta County supervisors approve the plan before they fight it. City Atty.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
In "Jack Reacher," the new thriller starring Tom Cruise, the crime that draws the film's reclusive ex-Army investigator out of the shadows - a sniper gunning down people on a city street - couldn't have been a worse one to land in theaters just days after the horror of the Connecticut elementary school massacre (the studio delayed the film's release in the area). If a movie is compelling and artistic in its own right, it can survive the impact of these sorts of terrible real-life events, as "Dark Knight Rises" was forced to do over the summer after a gunman opened fire in a Colorado theater.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The U.S. Forest Service is considering allowing the first large rock quarry within the Tahoe National Forest to provide granite for rebuilding Interstate 80. The quarry would cover about 60 acres near Yuba Gap, 40 miles east of Auburn. The highway is being rebuilt between Auburn and the Nevada border for the first time since its construction 42 years ago, a process expected to take another 10 to 15 years.
NEWS
November 30, 2008 | John Leicester, Leicester writes for the Associated Press.
The memories are 64 years old but retold with the clarity of yesterday: a young boy lowered by rope into a deep, dark cave, watching the sky above shrink to a small and distant patch of blue. That hole was home for a month for Gerard Mangnan, his family and dozens of others. And it probably saved their lives. While they huddled underground, Allied and Nazi troops above were waging one of the toughest battles of the D-Day invasion. Now, generations later, the story of how caves and quarries became bomb shelters during the 1944 battle for the Normandy city of Caen is being brought alive by an amateur archaeologist, his photographer colleague and the memories of survivors like Mangnan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2004 | Richard Fausset, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to settle a lawsuit challenging the county's rejection of a massive gravel quarry near Santa Clarita. A lawyer for Cemex Inc., which hopes to create the mine, called the settlement a victory. But its effect on the project remained unclear: The settlement must still be approved by a federal judge, and no details will be made public until then.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1996 | DEBORAH BELGUM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The residents in quiet Rolling Hills Estates were expecting new neighbors to move in across the street. But instead of moving vans, they may be getting a parade of dirt-moving trucks. The people on Bridlewood Circle thought that the 63-year-old quarry across the way was near extinction and would finally close so that houses or a golf course could go in. But Chandler's Palos Verdes Sand & Gravel Co.
WORLD
February 8, 2011 | By Devorah Lauter, Los Angeles Times
It's 4 a.m., and an IT geek with scruffy blond hair called Bunny is sipping beer and swallowing chunks of bread dipped in cheese fondue. Other people are passing around joints, or just chilling ? literally. The dank room is not that cold, but wading through stone corridors flooded with gray water has left their clothes soaked. That's what happens when you have a middle-of-the-night picnic 65 feet under the streets of Paris. This night, about a dozen people have found their way here through a maze of tunnels, caverns and half-flooded passageways, stepping over a few skeletons and piles of ruins, some dating to the time when the Romans called the city Lutetia.
WORLD
October 17, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Seventy-four boys ranging in age from 4 to 15 were rescued from Nigerian granite quarries where they had been forced to work, officials said. Their torsos scarred from beatings, they were receiving medical treatment in the Beninese city of Cotonou. The children told authorities that over the previous three months at least 13 other boys had died, succumbing to exhaustion, disease, hunger and abuse.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 2012 | By Frank Shyong, Los Angeles Times
Through seven years of disputes, a proposed rock quarry site in Riverside County has been called a job creator, an economy killer, an environmental disaster and even a creation site. The debate ended Thursday, when the Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians agreed to purchase 354 acres of the mountaintop site for $3 million and pay developer Granite Construction $17.35 million to end the dispute. Pu'eska Mountain, as the quarry site is known, "is our people's place of creation," said Pechanga Chairman Mark Macarro.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2012 | By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
Jeff Sikich shinnied up a charred oak in the Allegheny Mountains of western Virginia, shined his flashlight down into the hollowed-out trunk and gazed into the wary eyes of a mother bear 10 feet below. As he fired a sedative dart into the black bear's shoulder, another biologist on the ground hollered for Sikich to block the opening to keep the bear from climbing up and out. Sikich leaned his long torso into the trunk's interior as the bear raced up, stopping about a foot from his nose.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2012 | By Liesl Bradner
Naoya Hatakeyama, well known in Japan for his large-scale photographs of man's impact on natural settings, can trace his fascination with altered landscapes to his childhood growing up around limestone quarries in the town of Rikuzentakata, where his father worked in a cement factory. "He is drawn to places in flux, where some sort of industrial situation is happening," noted Lisa Sutcliffe, assistant curator at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, where Hatakeyama's first solo exhibition in the U.S., "Natural Stories," runs through Nov. 4. Organized in conjunction with the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography, the photos span his career during the last three decades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 2012 | By Robert Faturechi, Los Angeles Times
Thirty-six years ago, three men kidnapped a bus full of schoolchildren for ransom before entombing them in a San Joaquin Valley rock quarry. The 1976 crime has become part of California lore - and many of those in the small town of Chowchilla, where it happened, thought those responsible would stay behind bars for life. But later this month, one of the three kidnappers will be a free man. A spokesman for the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation said last week that Richard Schoenfeld's release became necessary after the state Supreme Court decided not to intercede in a lower court's judgment requiring the kidnapper's immediate release.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2012 | By Scott Gold, Deborah Vankin and Paloma Esquivel, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles' newest rock star, like so many before her, sleeps by day and rolls on by night, gathering, as they say, no moss. She stops in one town after another - in Ontario, La Palma, Lakewood and Long Beach. In each, she tantalizes and mesmerizes, conjuring a joyful circus, even a few moments of unbridled exuberance that some might regret down the road. Then, just as her star is brightest, she moves on, as if someone had given her the same advice offered by Gypsy Rose Lee's mother: Always leave them wanting more.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2012 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
When director George Lucas hired illustrator Ralph McQuarrie in 1974 to do a series of paintings visualizing scenes from his script for an intergalactic war movie he was trying to sell, McQuarrie liked the concept for the space fantasy. He just didn't think it would ever get made. "My impression was it was too expensive. There wouldn't be enough of an audience. It's just too complicated," he recalled in a 1999 interview with the San Diego Union-Tribune. "But George knew a lot of things that I didn't know.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2012 | By Liesl Bradner
Naoya Hatakeyama, well known in Japan for his large-scale photographs of man's impact on natural settings, can trace his fascination with altered landscapes to his childhood growing up around limestone quarries in the town of Rikuzentakata, where his father worked in a cement factory. "He is drawn to places in flux, where some sort of industrial situation is happening," noted Lisa Sutcliffe, assistant curator at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, where Hatakeyama's first solo exhibition in the U.S., "Natural Stories," runs through Nov. 4. Organized in conjunction with the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography, the photos span his career during the last three decades.
NEWS
May 9, 2002 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's great peaks--Whitney, Shasta, Mammoth Mountain--dwarf tiny Mt. Slover. Even a century ago, before miners blasted so much of it away, Mt. Slover was scarcely more than a molehill. It stood 700 feet tall, base to summit, on an arid plain in what is now Colton. The mountain's size and shape have been vastly altered. Nearly 100 million tons of rock have been carved away, leaving a steep, conical mound gouged with terraces. The flattened summit is now 300 feet high.
NEWS
March 5, 2012 | By Dennis McLellan
Ralph McQuarrie , an illustrator who was responsible for creating the look of Darth Vader, C-3PO, R2-D2, the Stormtroopers and many other characters for director George Lucas' “Star Wars” movies, has died. McQuarrie, who shared an Academy Award for visual effects for “Cocoon” in 1986, was 82. McQuarrie, whose paintings helped persuade 20th Century Fox to greenlight what became the 1977 blockbuster “Star Wars,” died Saturday at his home in Berkeley, said John Scoleri, co-author of a book on McQuarrie's art. He had Parkinson's disease and recently had been in declining health.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2012 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
The fastest-growing county in California rejected a massive, mountaintop rock quarry Thursday that supporters called an essential source of the ingredients that fed the region's economic ascent. In the end, however, neighborhood objections to increased traffic, possible health hazards and environmental destruction won out, a rare outcome in the pro-development frontier of the Inland Empire. Fierce opposition in Temecula, a city known for its vineyard-covered valley and rock-ribbed conservative politics, persuaded the Riverside County Board of Supervisors to vote down the proposed rock mine by a 3-2 vote, despite the promise of hundreds of new blue-collar jobs to the recession-flattened region.
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