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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2006 | Peter Hong, Times Staff Writer
A 17-year-old accused of plotting to bomb an Antelope Valley high school pleaded not guilty in Los Angeles County Superior Court in Lancaster on Monday to charges of conspiracy to commit murder and explosives possession. A juvenile court judge in Sylmar ruled last week that Johnny Alvarez Casas would be tried as an adult. Prosecutors have accused him of planning with a 15-year-old friend to set a bomb off at Quartz Hill High School last Valentine's Day.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2006 | Jonathan Abrams, Times Staff Writer
Two Quartz Hill teenagers planned a Columbine-style attack on their old high school in February in meticulous detail, sheriff's deputies allege. Johnny Alvarez Casas, then 17, and his friend, then 15, stockpiled ammunition and bomb-making supplies in their homes, then practiced detonating improvised explosives in the Antelope Valley desert, deputies said. The younger suspect's name is being withheld because of his age.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1995
As a 30-year Antelope Valley resident, I want to praise Linda Thompson-Taylor for opposing the use of Confederacy symbols at Quartz Hill High School. The NAACP president showed courage in facing elements of the community that frighten many of us. Those Confederacy symbols always bothered me too. But I never said anything about them except to like-minded people. Why borrow trouble? Well, Thompson-Taylor borrowed trouble and we're all in her debt. ETHEL BLACK Lancaster
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2006 | Peter Hong, Times Staff Writer
A 17-year-old accused of plotting to bomb an Antelope Valley high school pleaded not guilty in Los Angeles County Superior Court in Lancaster on Monday to charges of conspiracy to commit murder and explosives possession. A juvenile court judge in Sylmar ruled last week that Johnny Alvarez Casas would be tried as an adult. Prosecutors have accused him of planning with a 15-year-old friend to set a bomb off at Quartz Hill High School last Valentine's Day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1995
A group of African Americans has demanded that Quartz Hill High School's use of the symbols of the Confederacy be eliminated and that district employees receive mandatory sensitivity training. "In case you haven't heard, the South lost the war," NAACP official Lynda Thompson Taylor told the Antelope Valley Union High School District board Wednesday night. "This is the United States of America. Not the Confederate States of America. . . . The symbols are offensive and degrading to all Americans."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
A former high school student who alleges that she was unfairly rejected during cheerleader tryouts has taken her case to federal court, claiming that the Antelope Valley school district violated her civil rights. The lawsuit was filed Tuesday in U.S. District Court by former Quartz Hill High School student Kelly Smith.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1999 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN
Three teenagers were arrested Tuesday on separate charges of threatening to blow up Quartz Hill High School in the Antelope Valley, making death threats against classmates and possessing an inert hand grenade, authorities said. Investigators believe that two of the three shared information about bomb making, said Lt. Dave Collin of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. But there was no evidence that the Quartz Hill High students were conspiring to commit the crimes, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2002 | RICHARD FAUSSET, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the suburbs of the Mojave Desert, two All-American pastimes have historically generated passionate intensity: teenage beauty contests and high school football. So when local school board member Al Beattie learned that the latest legal challenge facing the Antelope Valley Union High School District involved both tiaras and pompoms, he was hardly shocked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1995 | SCOTT HARRIS
The important thing to remember, Lou Bozigian says, is that nobody meant any harm. The fact that Quartz Hill High School calls its teams the Rebels, the fact that Johnny Reb is their mascot and the fact that the Confederate flag appears on the school emblem were never intended to suggest sympathy for the slave owners who ruled the Old South. But if it looks that way--well, yes, Bozigian agrees, that's a problem.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2001 | MASSIE RITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Antelope Valley girl who was sued for reporting a boy's threats on her high school campus is supporting state legislation that would protect student tipsters from lawsuits such as the one that left her family with a $40,000 legal bill. Kristina Tapia, 17, and her parents endorsed the proposed legislation, which comes after Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Frank Y.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2006 | Gregory W. Griggs, Times Staff Writer
Internet rumors of Friday the 13th violence at a high school near Lancaster caused hundreds of students to skip school or leave early with worried parents, said school and law enforcement officials. Also, 10 Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies were sent to the school Friday morning as a precaution. "This was rumor, upon rumor, upon rumor," said Mark Bryant, principal of 3,400-student Quartz Hill High School. The rumor involved two former students, ages 15 and 17, who were arrested Dec.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2005 | James Ricci, Times Staff Writer
Two juveniles who confessed to a chilling, Columbine-like plan to massacre Quartz Hill High School students on Valentine's Day 2006 have been arrested, Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department officials said Friday. The two Lancaster teens are former Quartz Hill High students who had been transferred to other schools for disciplinary reasons. They told deputies they intended to kill students, particularly those who had made fun of them, with guns and homemade explosives, then commit suicide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
A former high school student who alleges that she was unfairly rejected during cheerleader tryouts has taken her case to federal court, claiming that the Antelope Valley school district violated her civil rights. The lawsuit was filed Tuesday in U.S. District Court by former Quartz Hill High School student Kelly Smith.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2003 | Richard Fausset, Times Staff Writer
When her daughter was rejected by this year's Quartz Hill High School cheerleading squad, Liz Smith decided to make a goal-line stand -- in Los Angeles Superior Court. Smith is hoping a judge will force the local school board to fully investigate last spring's tryouts, when her daughter, Kelly, performed an ill-fated routine to the strains of "I Want Candy." The goal, attorney Brian Reed said, is to have cheer coach Tammy Stewart fired.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2002 | RICHARD FAUSSET, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the suburbs of the Mojave Desert, two All-American pastimes have historically generated passionate intensity: teenage beauty contests and high school football. So when local school board member Al Beattie learned that the latest legal challenge facing the Antelope Valley Union High School District involved both tiaras and pompoms, he was hardly shocked.
SPORTS
April 20, 2001 | DAVE DESMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Somebody has to win the Golden League softball championship. League bylaws say so. Now, if only a team would step forward and act like it actually wants it. It certainly didn't look like defending champion and favorite Highland High did Thursday, when the Bulldogs frittered away three leads and sole possession of first place in a 9-4 loss to Quartz Hill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2001 | MASSIE RITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Antelope Valley girl who was sued for reporting a boy's threats on her high school campus is supporting state legislation that would protect student tipsters from lawsuits such as the one that left her family with a $40,000 legal bill. Kristina Tapia, 17, and her parents endorsed the proposed legislation, which comes after Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Frank Y.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2001 | MASSIE RITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A lawsuit filed by the parents of a teenage girl in Lancaster raises an unusual legal question: When a student helps a school investigate threats, who pays if the young informant is sued? The attorney for Stephen and Kimberly Tapia, the girl's parents, said they are stuck with a $40,000 legal bill because their daughter did what school officials have been urging students to do since the 1999 Columbine massacre: Tell authorities if they see or hear anything suspicious.
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