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BUSINESS
April 22, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - California's air quality officials soon may be adding a new phrase to their bureaucratic vocabulary: " le rechauffement climatique . " That's French for global warming. The California Air Resources Board on Friday linked its program for cutting greenhouse gas emissions and curbing climate change with one in the French-speaking, Canadian province of Quebec. The merger starts Jan. 1. On April 8, Gov. Jerry Brown certified the two cap-and-trade systems as compatible.
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WORLD
April 8, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Parti Quebecois suffered its worst provincial election defeat in 44 years on Monday, spurring debate throughout Canada on whether the party's signature goal of Quebec independence is dead. Politicians and pundits took to the airwaves Tuesday to proclaim the separatist movement an idea whose time has come and gone. Parti Quebecois won only 25% of the provincial parliament vote, weighed down by a prominent candidate's vow to stage another referendum on separation despite what pollsters say is a two-thirds majority of Quebec voters opposed to the idea.
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WORLD
August 13, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Canadian transportation officials Tuesday suspended the operating license of the regional railway company whose unmanned train broke loose from a Quebec siding last month and ignited a massive fireball that killed 47 people and devastated the town of Lac-Megantic. The Canadian Transportation Agency action will bar Montreal, Maine & Atlantic Railway from further movement on Canadian rails beginning Aug. 20. The suspension was ordered because the CTA, a Canadian federal agency that acts as an independent regulator, said MMA had insufficient insurance and was unable to afford to buy it, given its already massive debt even before calculating potential liabilities from the July 6 disaster.
WORLD
January 24, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
A fire that swept through a home for seniors in the Quebec to wn of L'Isle- Verte likely took the lives of many of the 30 frail and elderly residents now listed as missing, authorities in the Canadian province said Friday. Five of the 52 people registered as living at the Residence du Havre were confirmed dead after the Thursday blaze, and 20 were reported to have been brought out to safety. Ice that now encrusts the doused fire scene has hampered the search for the missing , Quebec provincial police Lt. Guy Lapointe told CBC News.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1987 | Associated Press
Eleven 18th-Century Skeletons, believed to have been English subjects captured by the French, have been discovered in fortifications surrounding Quebec's old quarter. The find by construction workers who were reinforcing the structure brings the number of skeletons uncovered to 37, archeologist Gisele Piedalue said last week.
BUSINESS
May 10, 1997 | MARIE-CLAUDE LORTIE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Imagine a Pepsi advertising campaign with not a single grizzly bear, no Cindy Crawford, not even a Michael Jackson or a Shaquille O'Neal. Imagine instead a cabdriver who cries when he sees a Pepsi parking lot because the Pepsi trucks are just so beautiful. Or a Pepsi delivery guy-turned-hero with red and blue tights, who calls himself Pepsiman and crashes through walls to deliver the goods.
NEWS
November 23, 1991 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Throughout much of their history, French-speakers in the province of Quebec suffered economic discrimination at the hands of an English-speaking business elite. Francophones traditionally worked the shop floors and assembly lines; les anglais called the tune from the executive suite. That isn't so in Quebec today, but the painful memories linger.
NEWS
June 19, 1990 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The crowd roared as a thin, spectacled man in a blue flannel suit came through the pillared doorway of a downtown convention center. Flashbulbs popped, television lights came on, and reporters homed in with their microphones. The premier of Quebec, Robert Bourassa, was about to address the Canadian people. "He's not at all charismatic," said Montreal newspaper editor Paul-Andre Comeau, but that doesn't matter. Robert Bourassa isn't just any Canadian politician, and these aren't ordinary times north of the 49th parallel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1997 | From Associated Press
The bishops who reigned supreme in Quebec for more than a century would wince. These days church pews are rarely filled, and more couples in this province live together unmarried than anywhere else in Canada. The Roman Catholic Church, once the rock on which French Canadians built their identity, now plays a radically diminished role in Quebec society. Although nearly all of the province's 6 million French speakers have Catholic roots, fewer than 10% attend Mass regularly, compared with 90% a few decades ago. Once- pervasive church influence over politics and culture has faded almost totally.
NEWS
November 22, 1990 | E.J. DIONNE, WASHINGTON POST
This is a story about a family reunion in Quebec where 1,400 people showed up. What sort of family would have 1,400 people show up at a reunion? Mine. The kind of family that's not so much a family as a political machine. In 1986, some folks in Quebec, where the family hails from, organized a group called L'Association les Dionne D'Amerique Inc. I got a mailing from them a few years back and decided: At last, a special interest group I can support unreservedly. So please do not expect a fair-minded, objective account.
WORLD
August 13, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Canadian transportation officials Tuesday suspended the operating license of the regional railway company whose unmanned train broke loose from a Quebec siding last month and ignited a massive fireball that killed 47 people and devastated the town of Lac-Megantic. The Canadian Transportation Agency action will bar Montreal, Maine & Atlantic Railway from further movement on Canadian rails beginning Aug. 20. The suspension was ordered because the CTA, a Canadian federal agency that acts as an independent regulator, said MMA had insufficient insurance and was unable to afford to buy it, given its already massive debt even before calculating potential liabilities from the July 6 disaster.
WORLD
July 6, 2013 | By Bruce A. McLeod
A driverless runaway train hauling tankers of crude oil derailed in the center of a small town in Quebec, Canada, early Saturday, igniting massive fireballs and gushing flaming fuel that left at least one person dead and as many as 100 missing, according to residents and local officials. The accident forced the evacuation of 2,000 people from Lac-Megantic, a town of 6,000 people about 155 miles east of Montreal and close to the Maine border. The 73-car train, destined for Maine, had been parked outside the town for a crew change and was left unattended, said Joseph McGonigle, vice president of Montreal, Maine & Atlantic Railway.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - California's air quality officials soon may be adding a new phrase to their bureaucratic vocabulary: " le rechauffement climatique . " That's French for global warming. The California Air Resources Board on Friday linked its program for cutting greenhouse gas emissions and curbing climate change with one in the French-speaking, Canadian province of Quebec. The merger starts Jan. 1. On April 8, Gov. Jerry Brown certified the two cap-and-trade systems as compatible.
SPORTS
April 21, 2013 | By Helene Elliott
Paul Lagloire played high school hockey as a youngster in the Quebec town of Bromont, but he turned down an invitation to the training camp of the major junior team in Verdun because he thought he was too small to succeed, at 5 feet 10-1/2 and 130 pounds. His hockey career didn't take off until decades later, after he had moved to California and retired from his job as a chief accountant and office manager. “I was not doing any serious work. All my joints and legs and nerves were still in good shape because I was not doing heavy workloads,” said Lagloire, who lives in Glendale.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2013 | By Anthony York
BEIJING -- As he brings his message of carbon reduction to top officials in China, Gov. Jerry Brown moved another step closer to broadening California's carbon-trading market Tuesday. Before crossing the Pacific, the governor sent a letter to the state Air Resources Board enabling it to move ahead with plans to link California's carbon-trading market with one in the Canadian province of Quebec. Carbon markets aim to reduce overall pollution by creating a system that limits the total amount of carbon emissions allowed but enables big polluters to buy the right to pollute more.
NEWS
March 27, 2013 | By Jay Jones
Beginning in July, travelers on VIA Rail , the national passenger railroad of Canada , will be able to enjoy streaming video free of charge. The service will be available in the corridor between Windsor, Ontario, and Quebec City. That includes the popular line linking the country's two largest cities, Toronto and Montreal. The streaming video - accessible on smartphones, tablets, and laptops - will be provided in partnership with the National Film Board and the CBC, Canada's public broadcaster.
SPORTS
March 21, 2000
Pavel and Valeri Bure are challenging to become the highest-scoring brother combination in an NHL season. The Bures have tallied 79 goals, Pavel a league-leading 45 with the Florida Panthers and Valeri 34 with the Calgary Flames. The NHL's top-scoring brother combos: 88--Bobby Hull (Chicago), 58, and Dennis (Chicago), 30, in 1968-69. 84--Bobby Hull (Chicago), 44, and Dennis (Chicago), 40, in 1970-71. 83--Peter Stastny (Quebec), 47, and Marian (Quebec), 36, in 1982-83.
TRAVEL
May 10, 1992
Your Feb. 16 article ("Showtime Is About to Hit Streets of Montreal"), about Montreal's 350th birthday, prompts this urgent suggestion: Anyone preparing for a trip to the province of Quebec must read "Oh Canada! Oh Quebec," by Mordecai Richler. Failing that, dig up the Sept. 23, 1991, issue of The New Yorker on which it was based. MERRILL SARTY Los Angeles
OPINION
December 13, 2012 | By Jay Jones
A ski vacation deep in the heart of Francophone Quebec is an adventure in its own right. But at Le Massif de Charlevoix , a year-round resort about 90 miles northeast of Quebec City, getting to the slopes by rail adds to the experience. Not content to open a resort amid spectacular scenery overlooking the broad and beautiful St. Lawrence Seaway, the owners created their own railway to ferry passengers between Quebec City, the provincial capital, and the 350-year-old village of Baie-Saint-Paul.
NEWS
November 7, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Ice hotels are quirky subfreezing structures. They feature elaborate ice sculptures, ice beds and usually an ice bar. The first one was built in 1991, about 125 miles north of the Arctic Circle in a village in Sweden's Lapland, and it has been re-created every year since. But you don't have to go that far for a little cold comfort. The Ice Hotel , or Hotel de Glace, in Canada's Quebec City, about 10 minutes from downtown, has 32 rooms and suites (some with fireplaces, which seems like cheating)
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