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February 24, 1996 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
That cracking sound coming from north of the U.S. border isn't ice breaking in the spring thaw. It's the splintering of Canada's body politic. Members of Parliament return to work in Ottawa on Tuesday after an extended mid-winter recess and are still without a consensus on the best strategy for battling Quebec's resurgent separatists. Is it time to get tough with the secessionists, even at the risk of violence? Should the government draw a line in the snow and dare the separatists to cross it?
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NEWS
July 2, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
People who were moved to mental institutions by Quebec officials seeking more federal money have accepted a compensation offer from the province for abuse they suffered decades ago. The 1,000 surviving so-called Duplessis orphans--named for Maurice Duplessis, who was premier of Quebec in the 1940s and '50s--will receive about $16,650 each.
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NEWS
August 30, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Quebec Premier Robert Bourassa, fresh from putting the finishing touches on a unity deal with English Canada, launched a strong campaign at a special party convention in Ste. Foy to try and unite his divided party behind the accord. In a speech to about 3,500 cheering Liberals, Bourassa vigorously defended the accord, which reforms Parliament and shares out federal powers to accommodate French-speaking Quebec's demands for more political autonomy.
NEWS
February 10, 2000 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Herve Bertrand remembers the day when his life at a Quebec orphanage turned inside out. "On March 18, 1954, the nuns came in and said, 'From today, you are all crazy.' Everyone started to cry, even the nuns. Then everything changed: Our lessons stopped, and work--they called it therapy--began. I saw the bars go on the windows, the fences go up around the compound. I saw the autobuses pull up full of psychiatric patients--our new roommates. It was like a prison.
NEWS
June 27, 1992 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It started as a well-meaning attempt to amend the Canadian constitution and keep the country together. Now, eight months and countless missed deadlines later, Canada's national-unity negotiations are proving so unwieldy--and some of the proposals so far-fetched--that many well-placed Canadians have begun to hope the talks fail.
NEWS
March 2, 1992 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A parliamentary committee issued a rough-draft package of constitutional amendments aimed at keeping Canada together, after two days of delays and an ominous display of partisan feuding. The report--which was due out on Friday but made public only Sunday afternoon--offers concessions to many of the groups vying for increased powers within Canada: Quebec Francophones, western Anglophones, native peoples and Social Democrats.
NEWS
June 29, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Queen Elizabeth II, ignoring warnings from Quebec politicians, will go ahead with a visit to the French-speaking province Sunday, Canada's 123rd anniversary, a government spokesman said. The main purpose of her visit had been to preside over Quebec's signing of the national constitution. However, the accord fell apart last week over an amendment that would have recognized the province as a distinct society.
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
The Progressive Conservative national government is expected to be dealt a setback today in a special parliamentary election in Quebec. Opinion polls show the Conservative candidate running a dismal third for the seat in the traditionally Conservative province, which is the home of Prime Minister Brian Mulroney. Quebec voters have become disenchanted with higher interest rates and unemployment in the province; the issue of corruption in the party is also a factor in the race.
NEWS
September 26, 1989
Quebec voters swept Premier Robert Bourassa's Liberal Party back to power with a large although slightly reduced majority. Nearly complete election returns from the Canadian province indicated that the Liberals, campaigning on economic prosperity, were reelected or leading in 93 of 125 legislative seats against 30 seats for the French separatist Parti Quebecois. The Liberals held 98 seats in the previous 122-seat legislature, against 19 for the Parti Quebecois.
NEWS
March 5, 1991
Quebec's governing Liberal Party is to debate its stand on the touchy issue of independence from Canada during its biennial convention starting Friday. Traditionally supporting Canadian unity, the Liberals now see a majority of Francophone Quebecers calling for some form of sovereignty, and their challenge is to find a way of catering to these voters while simultaneously distancing themselves from the outright independentiste opposition, the Parti Quebecois.
NEWS
December 1, 1998 | From Associated Press
Quebec's pro-independence government was reelected Monday but won only 43% of the popular vote, probably dampening its zest for holding a secession referendum soon. The outcome means a new term of up to five years for Quebec's charismatic premier, Lucien Bouchard, who says he will call a referendum on independence whenever he feels the separatist side can win. But he may need to wait awhile for what he calls the "winning conditions."
NEWS
August 21, 1998 | From Associated Press
In the first legal ruling on Canada's most divisive issue, the Supreme Court said Thursday that Quebec--home to a powerful separatist movement--cannot secede without seeking the federal government's consent. But the high court left open the possibility of a breakaway arranged at the bargaining table. It said federal officials would be obligated to negotiate if, as separatist leaders hope, a clear majority of voters in the mostly French-speaking province approved secession in a referendum.
NEWS
December 27, 1997 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After nearly a decade of steady political advancement toward their dream of creating a French-speaking nation in North America, Quebec's separatists are in sudden, serious retreat in the face of a vigorous counterattack by Canada's federal government. The charge is being led by an unlikely captain: a 44-year-old intellectual named Stephane Dion who was recruited into politics just two years ago from the University of Montreal.
NEWS
June 4, 1997 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Quebec's separatists Tuesday were contemplating election results that exposed weaknesses in their movement and yielded a measure of optimism to Canadians--and Americans--who hope to see Canada remain united. The Bloc Quebecois, the separatist party in the Canadian federal Parliament, won 44 of Quebec's 75 seats and 39% of the popular vote in the mostly French-speaking province in Monday's election. But that was down from the 54 seats and 49% that the party received in the last election, in 1993.
NEWS
March 16, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The Bloc Quebecois, a Quebec separatist party that forms the official opposition in Canada's Parliament, chose former Communist Gilles Duceppe as its new leader. The 49-year-old won the leadership with 53% of the ballots mailed in by party members. About 50,000 of the Bloc's 113,000 members voted. In his acceptance speech to the convention in Montreal, Duceppe called for a "dialogue of equals" between Quebec and the rest of Canada.
NEWS
April 5, 1996 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For a quarter of a century, Quebec delegations have worked as sort of shadow embassies and consulates to their Canadian counterparts. They have served to remind the world of Quebec's distinct place as the center of French language and culture in North America, to promote trade and investment, and, when a separatist government is in power in Quebec City as it is now, they tout the province's aspirations toward independence from the rest of Canada.
NEWS
December 1, 1998 | From Associated Press
Quebec's pro-independence government was reelected Monday but won only 43% of the popular vote, probably dampening its zest for holding a secession referendum soon. The outcome means a new term of up to five years for Quebec's charismatic premier, Lucien Bouchard, who says he will call a referendum on independence whenever he feels the separatist side can win. But he may need to wait awhile for what he calls the "winning conditions."
NEWS
February 24, 1996 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
That cracking sound coming from north of the U.S. border isn't ice breaking in the spring thaw. It's the splintering of Canada's body politic. Members of Parliament return to work in Ottawa on Tuesday after an extended mid-winter recess and are still without a consensus on the best strategy for battling Quebec's resurgent separatists. Is it time to get tough with the secessionists, even at the risk of violence? Should the government draw a line in the snow and dare the separatists to cross it?
NEWS
December 10, 1995 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first snowstorm of the season slammed unexpectedly into this city last week, and the descent of winter meshed with the sepulchral mood in much of Montreal. Five weeks after Quebec voters rejected separation from Canada by a margin of less than 2%, the wounds inflicted by the campaign continue to fester. Anticipating another referendum by the end of 1997, Quebeckers are digging in for an extended period of political trench warfare.
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