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Quechan Indians

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NEWS
May 19, 1997 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Just after midnight, Fina Villicana stepped outside to retrieve her laundry from the clothesline in her backyard. Suddenly, beyond a wind-blown clump of willows, she saw a bright spotlight headed her way and heard the roar of an engine. She ran for cover, hiding under her carport as chemicals rained down around her.
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NEWS
June 20, 2000 | From Associated Press
American Indians won a rare victory in the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday as the justices allowed the Quechan tribe to pursue its claim to about 25.6 billion gallons of Colorado River water each year. Arizona and California had asked the high court to block the Quechan water claim, saying that the tribe gave up any rights to that water in 1983.
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NEWS
June 20, 2000 | From Associated Press
American Indians won a rare victory in the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday as the justices allowed the Quechan tribe to pursue its claim to about 25.6 billion gallons of Colorado River water each year. Arizona and California had asked the high court to block the Quechan water claim, saying that the tribe gave up any rights to that water in 1983.
NEWS
February 9, 1998 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most everyone agrees there is something of enormous importance in this rock-strewn and wind-swept portion of the eastern Imperial Valley bounded by Picacho Peak, Pilots Knob and Muggins Peak. A Canadian firm believes there is gold buried deep beneath the desert, and it wants permission to create a 1,571-acre open pit mine where 130,000 tons of rock a day would be gouged, blasted and drilled from the earth.
NEWS
February 9, 1998 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most everyone agrees there is something of enormous importance in this rock-strewn and wind-swept portion of the eastern Imperial Valley bounded by Picacho Peak, Pilots Knob and Muggins Peak. A Canadian firm believes there is gold buried deep beneath the desert, and it wants permission to create a 1,571-acre open pit mine where 130,000 tons of rock a day would be gouged, blasted and drilled from the earth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1993 | KURT PITZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was February, 1776, and as revolution brewed among English colonists on the East Coast, a Spanish explorer named Juan Bautista de Anza was leading 240 settlers to establish what would become the city of San Francisco. Despite hunger, Indian uprisings, disease and desertion, the Spanish had no time to waste, fearing the expansion of Russian colonization from the Aleutian Islands southward.
OPINION
April 4, 2002 | PHILIP R. PRYDE and JIM DIPESO
An axiom of protecting America's natural heritage is that a win is only temporary, but a loss is forever. Nowhere is this more true than open pit mines--immensely damaging projects that leave toxic scars on the public's land and cleanup liabilities with the taxpayers. Californians can look forward to more of the same if the proposed Glamis Imperial Project, near the Colorado River in eastern Imperial County, is approved.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1989 | JOHNNY P. FLYNN, Johnny P. Flynn is a doctoral candidate in native American religions at UC Santa Barbara. He is a member of the Potawatomi tribe of Oklahoma
Edward Winslow, one of the Pilgrim fathers and eventual governor of Plymouth Colony, wrote to a friend in England in 1621 that " . . . after we had gathered the fruits of our labor . . . many of the Indians (were) amongst us, whom for three days we entertained and feasted." Most Americans know that the native people had a role in the first Thanksgiving, but they are usually portrayed in the background, just part of the scenery, a nameless supporting cast for the Pilgrim settlers.
BUSINESS
August 20, 2003 | Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff writer
Mining company Glamis Gold Ltd. is taking aim at tough California environmental laws by threatening to sue under an obscure provision of the North American Free Trade Agreement. Glamis says new California restrictions on open-pit mining have destroyed the value of its proposed gold mine in Imperial County. To build the mine, which has long been controversial, Glamis would excavate 1,571 square miles of federally protected desert in the state's southeast corner that includes religious and cultural sites sacred to the Quechan Indians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2010 | By David Kelly, Los Angeles Times
After a rough ride through narrow desert washes, Alfredo Figueroa came to a clearing and ordered the vehicles to halt. The giants were waiting. Figueroa strode briskly across the plain. Before him, clear lines in the stony sand formed a 200-foot-long image of the flute-playing Native American god Kokopelli. Beside him was Cicimitl, an Aztec spirit said to guide souls to the afterlife. "No one has a clue that this stuff is out here," Figueroa said, picking his way around a massive foot.
NEWS
May 19, 1997 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Just after midnight, Fina Villicana stepped outside to retrieve her laundry from the clothesline in her backyard. Suddenly, beyond a wind-blown clump of willows, she saw a bright spotlight headed her way and heard the roar of an engine. She ran for cover, hiding under her carport as chemicals rained down around her.
NEWS
October 8, 1991 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anna Sandoval remembers the low point as the day she trudged 10 miles to El Cajon, a Mission Indian on welfare looking for milk for her five children. Passing the wooden shacks with outhouses on the rocky hillsides of her reservation, she prayed for deliverance of her people. "I said, 'God, what can you do to help us?' " she recalled. Two decades later, when the bingo came, the first thing she did was build a new church. Then came the houses.
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