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Queen Mary Ship

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1992
A preliminary review of the Queen Mary by U.S. Navy inspectors indicated that the ship does not need to be immediately dry-docked at a cost of $6 million. The hull "gave no indications of imminent risk of flooding" because of rusting, Capt. B. Janov, commander of the Long Beach Naval Shipyard, recently advised city officials. Nevertheless, Janov recommended a thorough study of the ship's hull. Assistant City Manager John Shirey said Tuesday the city would seek such a study.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1992 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The majority of Long Beach's harbor commissioners said Wednesday they will not agree to pay $6.2 million to immediately dry-dock the Queen Mary and repair its rusty hull, as recommended by experts earlier this week. The harbor commissioners had agreed to pay $6.5 million for repairs that were already planned. But three of the five commissioners said in interviews that they would rather sell the ship to a Hong Kong firm for $20 million than put more money into the Long Beach landmark.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1992 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Queen Mary should be dry-docked immediately for repairs to its rusty, leaky hull, according to a new report. The additional $6.2-million expense could jeopardize a City Council proposal to keep the ship in Long Beach. City officials had been optimistic that they could persuade the Harbor Department to pay for $6 million in immediate repairs recommended by Rados International Corp. in a report released in July.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1992 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acting to stave off the sale of the Queen Mary, the Long Beach City Council voted Tuesday to begin negotiations to take over the historic ocean liner from the city's Harbor Department. The 7-2 vote, which followed six hours of sometimes heated debate and public testimony, virtually ensures that the ship will remain in Long Beach for the foreseeable future, city and harbor officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1992 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A majority of Long Beach's harbor commissioners favor selling the Queen Mary, but today the group will offer to turn the ocean liner over to the City Council--probably the last hope of keeping the ship in the city. The Board of Harbor Commissioners agreed Monday in a closed session to make the offer to the City Council before accepting a $20-million bid from an investment group that wants to move the ship to Hong Kong, according to a source close to the negotiations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1992
Members of the county Historical Landmarks and Records Commission agreed Thursday to notify the state that the Queen Mary appears eligible for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places. Los Angeles County and the Board of Supervisors have no power to officially nominate the ship--owned by the Long Beach Harbor Department and managed by the Walt Disney Co.--for historical recognition from the federal government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1992
Long Beach City Auditor Robert E. Fronke has concluded that the Walt Disney Co. has done its part to maintain the Queen Mary, which is badly rusted and needs as much as $27 million in repairs and maintenance. Fronke said that his findings, which were reported to a City Council committee on Tuesday, were based on a review of documents and other information dating back to 1989.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1992
Long Beach officials on Tuesday narrowed down the list of proposals for the Queen Mary to six--one to operate the ocean liner where it is now moored and five to buy the vessel and move it out of the city. The Long Beach Board of Harbor Commissioners rejected 12 proposals to buy or operate the ship because they were not accompanied with a $100,000 bond, a requirement imposed by harbor officials to weed out spurious offers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1992 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long Beach has received 13 proposals to buy the Queen Mary--including one that would return the ship to its original port in England--and five other offers to run the city-owned tourist attraction where it is moored, officials said Tuesday. At least eight of the proposals would move the ship to other countries, including Japan and Canada, said Steven Dillenbeck, director of the city's Harbor Department, which has jurisdiction over the Queen Mary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1992 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An insurance consultant Monday concurred with an earlier opinion that the Queen Mary needs millions of dollars in immediate repairs and improvements to make it safe for tourists and employees. The risk management division of consultant Towers Perrin also recommended that the city of Long Beach or the vessel's operator carry at least $20 million of coverage to protect against huge losses should there be a disaster on the ocean liner.
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