Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsQueen Mary Ship
IN THE NEWS

Queen Mary Ship

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1993
An investment group that wanted to buy the Queen Mary filed a Superior Court lawsuit against the Long Beach City Council on Monday, alleging that it violated state law and the City Charter when it decided to award a new lease to operate the tourist attraction. The Queen Mary Preservation Trust, which includes Long Beach and Orange County businessmen, is seeking a court order requiring the City Council to set aside its Dec. 22 decision to award a five-year lease to Queen Mary Partners Ltd.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1993 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Long Beach Symphony was in debt and foundering, supporters called Joseph F. Prevratil to save it. When the city's Chamber of Commerce was nearly a quarter of a million in the red, officials called Prevratil to balance the books. When Long Beach's largest developer filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, the company asked Prevratil to help shepherd it back to solvency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1992 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of indecision and haggling, the Long Beach City Council finally decided to take over the Queen Mary and keep the landmark in town--but not before the ship's hotel closed and about 900 people lost their jobs. The months-long debate over the fate of the ship also cost the city two conventions, which would have brought thousands of people into the city's hotels and restaurants and produced an estimated $4 million in revenue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1992 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Long Beach City Council voted Tuesday to take control of the Queen Mary and lease it to a new operator, ending months of uncertainty and haggling over the future of the landmark. The action, approved on an 8-1 vote, calls for transfer of the ship at the end of the year to the city from the independently governed Harbor Department, which wanted to sell the vessel to a Hong Kong firm for $20 million. Under terms of the agreement, the Harbor Department is to give the city $6.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1992
Long Beach city officials announced Tuesday they are negotiating exclusively with an investment group headed by Joseph F. Prevratil, who once managed the Queen Mary, to run the tourist attraction beginning Jan. 1. City Manager James C. Hankla cited Prevratil's experience in choosing his proposal over two other bids to operate the ship. Prevratil oversaw the operation of the Queen Mary for the Wrather Corp., which ran the ship under a lease until 1988. The current operator, the Walt Disney Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1992
A new study indicating the Queen Mary is in better condition than feared apparently has cleared the way for the City Council to take jurisdiction of the landmark and keep it in Long Beach. The City Council on Tuesday directed the city attorney's office to draft an agreement that would transfer the money-losing tourist attraction from the city's independently governed Harbor Department. Final approval of the agreement is expected to come within two weeks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1992
A preliminary review of the Queen Mary by U.S. Navy inspectors indicated that the ship does not need to be immediately dry-docked at a cost of $6 million. The hull "gave no indications of imminent risk of flooding" because of rusting, Capt. B. Janov, commander of the Long Beach Naval Shipyard, recently advised city officials. Nevertheless, Janov recommended a thorough study of the ship's hull. Assistant City Manager John Shirey said Tuesday the city would seek such a study.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1992 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The majority of Long Beach's harbor commissioners said Wednesday they will not agree to pay $6.2 million to immediately dry-dock the Queen Mary and repair its rusty hull, as recommended by experts earlier this week. The harbor commissioners had agreed to pay $6.5 million for repairs that were already planned. But three of the five commissioners said in interviews that they would rather sell the ship to a Hong Kong firm for $20 million than put more money into the Long Beach landmark.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1992 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Queen Mary should be dry-docked immediately for repairs to its rusty, leaky hull, according to a new report. The additional $6.2-million expense could jeopardize a City Council proposal to keep the ship in Long Beach. City officials had been optimistic that they could persuade the Harbor Department to pay for $6 million in immediate repairs recommended by Rados International Corp. in a report released in July.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1992 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acting to stave off the sale of the Queen Mary, the Long Beach City Council voted Tuesday to begin negotiations to take over the historic ocean liner from the city's Harbor Department. The 7-2 vote, which followed six hours of sometimes heated debate and public testimony, virtually ensures that the ship will remain in Long Beach for the foreseeable future, city and harbor officials said.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|