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Queen Of Angels Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1998
The controversial sale of Queen of Angels Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center to Tenet Healthcare Corp., the nation's second-largest for-profit hospital chain, became final Friday, Tenet officials said. "We're delighted," said Tenet spokesman Harry Anderson. "We think we offer considerable strengths that will ensure a healthy future for the hospital and the community it serves." Queen of Angels joins Tenet's 32-member Southern California network.
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BUSINESS
November 11, 2004 | Lisa Girion
A medical group that owns hospitals, a medical school and a research institute in South Korea has reached a deal to buy Tenet Healthcare Corp.'s Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center. The deal is valued at $69 million, Tenet announced. Formerly known as Queen of Angels, the hospital is one of 27 that Santa Barbara-based Tenet is attempting to shed this year as part of a plan to restore the company to profitability. The buyer, CHA Medical Group, is led by Dr.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1989
Financially troubled Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center in Los Angeles will complete its merger with nearby Queen of Angels Medical Center on Jan. 27, a spokeswoman for the medical centers said Wednesday. On that day, Queen of Angels will close its aging 404-bed facility overlooking the Hollywood Freeway and move its doctors, patients and administrative personnel a few miles north to Hollywood Presbyterian's more modern 395-bed facility on Vermont Avenue in Hollywood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2002 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Striking health care employees at Queen of Angels-Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center ended their planned four-day walkout Monday but vowed to continue efforts to secure higher wages and other improvements. "The workers have shown they are together on this and are not going to back down," said Blanca Gallegos, spokeswoman for Local 399 of Service Employees International Union, which represents most hospital staff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1998
Over objections from consumer advocates, community groups and the Catholic Church, Atty. Gen. Dan Lungren approved the sale of Queen of Angels-Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center on Friday to the nation's second-largest commercial health care company. Tenet Healthcare Corp. will pay $86.4 million in the deal, one of the largest and most hotly contested conversions of a nonprofit hospital in the region's history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1990 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move prompted by the growing crisis in the state Medi-Cal system and by financial motives, UCLA Medical Center this week began diverting indigent patients from its emergency room to Queen of Angels-Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center, officials at both hospitals said. About 1,000 Medi-Cal patients are expected to be transferred each year from UCLA, mostly by ambulance, to the Hollywood hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2002 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Striking health care employees at Queen of Angels-Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center ended their planned four-day walkout Monday but vowed to continue efforts to secure higher wages and other improvements. "The workers have shown they are together on this and are not going to back down," said Blanca Gallegos, spokeswoman for Local 399 of Service Employees International Union, which represents most hospital staff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1998 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sale of Queen of Angels-Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center to a for-profit chain could lead to "overall destabilization" of the greater Hollywood area's emergency medical system, according to a state-mandated report. The problems would occur if the hospital cut or curtailed services, says the report by the Lewin Group, a health care consulting firm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1998 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A crowded community meeting Saturday over the sale of Queen of Angels-Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center to a for-profit corporation was punctuated by outcries from placard-wielding, foot-stamping opponents who chanted, "Save the Queen!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1989 | PAUL FELDMAN, Times Staff Writer
When staff physicians first learned of an impending merger between the financially troubled Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center and the aging Queen of Angels Medical Center, they wondered what the new facility would be called. History was at play, along with bureaucratic egos and marketing considerations. "Some people said . . . it would be called Hollywood Angels," recalled Dr. Samy Farag, medical chief of staff last year at Hollywood Presbyterian.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1998
The controversial sale of Queen of Angels Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center to Tenet Healthcare Corp., the nation's second-largest for-profit hospital chain, became final Friday, Tenet officials said. "We're delighted," said Tenet spokesman Harry Anderson. "We think we offer considerable strengths that will ensure a healthy future for the hospital and the community it serves." Queen of Angels joins Tenet's 32-member Southern California network.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1998
Over objections from consumer advocates, community groups and the Catholic Church, Atty. Gen. Dan Lungren approved the sale of Queen of Angels-Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center on Friday to the nation's second-largest commercial health care company. Tenet Healthcare Corp. will pay $86.4 million in the deal, one of the largest and most hotly contested conversions of a nonprofit hospital in the region's history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1998 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sale of Queen of Angels-Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center to a for-profit chain could lead to "overall destabilization" of the greater Hollywood area's emergency medical system, according to a state-mandated report. The problems would occur if the hospital cut or curtailed services, says the report by the Lewin Group, a health care consulting firm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1998 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A crowded community meeting Saturday over the sale of Queen of Angels-Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center to a for-profit corporation was punctuated by outcries from placard-wielding, foot-stamping opponents who chanted, "Save the Queen!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1998 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES SATFF WRITER
The battle over the sale of Catholic-run Queen of Angels-Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center to a for-profit chain has come to a head, with Cardinal Roger M. Mahony threatening to take the matter to the Vatican if the transaction is not halted by today. Opponents of the sale see the cardinal's call for the hospital to "cease and desist from the proposed sale" as a significant setback for the facility's board and the nation's second-largest hospital chain, Tenet Healthcare Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1997 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Controversy is nothing new in the world of hospital takeovers, but the debate at Catholic-run Queen of Angels-Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center--stoked by allegations of death threats, a blistering lawsuit and formal intervention by the cardinal himself--is remarkably fierce. The battle ignited after directors signaled their intention to sell the nonprofit hospital, dedicated largely to care of the poor, to Tenet Healthcare Corp., the nation's second-largest commercial hospital chain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1990 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County officials are exploring the purchase of Queen of Angels/Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center to replace aging County-USC Medical Center, according to a confidential memo sent to the Board of Supervisors last month. Chief Administrative Officer Richard B. Dixon said in the memo, "It appears the county may be in a position to take over the facility at a reasonable cost" if the hospital is unable to become fiscally viable in the next few months.
NEWS
July 12, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Citing a wide range of deficiencies in fire safety and the ability to monitor the quality of medical care, the nation's major hospital review organization has placed Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center on conditional accreditation. This is the second major county hospital to be placed on conditional accreditation. Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center was placed on the same probationary status earlier this year.
BUSINESS
March 22, 1997 | David R. Olmos
Tenet Healthcare Corp. confirmed it is in discussions about a possible acquisition or other business arrangement with Queen of Angels-Hollywood Presbyterian Hospital in Los Angeles. "We're in discussions," said Joan Galvan, a spokesman for Santa Barbara-based Tenet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1990 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move prompted by the growing crisis in the state Medi-Cal system and by financial motives, UCLA Medical Center this week began diverting indigent patients from its emergency room to Queen of Angels-Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center, officials at both hospitals said. About 1,000 Medi-Cal patients are expected to be transferred each year from UCLA, mostly by ambulance, to the Hollywood hospital.
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