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Queensway Bay Development

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2000 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frustrated by delays in their waterfront redevelopment plan, Long Beach city officials Wednesday told the builder of a proposed $100-million entertainment complex to move forward on it within 30 days or face dismissal. The ultimatum reflects the city's growing discontent over the stalled Queensway Bay development, which officials had hoped would lure tourists to attractions such as the Queen Mary ocean liner and the struggling Aquarium of the Pacific.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2001 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Retreating from threats to fire the developer of a long-stalled waterfront project, the Long Beach City Council has granted the builder a 15-month extension to break ground on the $100-million entertainment and retail center. Council members voted 6 to 1 on Tuesday night to let an Ohio-based company continue with the Queensway Bay project, which has been described as a cornerstone of the city's effort to remake itself into a prime tourist destination.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2000 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Plans for the Queensway Bay redevelopment project on the Long Beach waterfront have stalled again, threatening to unravel efforts by city officials to remake their downtown into one of the hottest tourist destinations in Southern California. In recent months, two major movie theater chains that were considered anchor tenants have had to bow out or face serious questions about financial viability because they are in bankruptcy court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2000 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frustrated by delays in their waterfront redevelopment plan, Long Beach city officials Wednesday told the builder of a proposed $100-million entertainment complex to move forward on it within 30 days or face dismissal. The ultimatum reflects the city's growing discontent over the stalled Queensway Bay development, which officials had hoped would lure tourists to attractions such as the Queen Mary ocean liner and the struggling Aquarium of the Pacific.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2000 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opponents and proponents of a $100-million entertainment complex planned for the Long Beach waterfront clashed Thursday during a daylong hearing before state officials charged with overseeing land use along the California shoreline. At issue is whether the controversial Queensway Bay project--an 18-acre mix of restaurants, theaters and retail stores--conforms with state law that regulates what can be built on coastal land owned by the state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2001 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Retreating from threats to fire the developer of a long-stalled waterfront project, the Long Beach City Council has granted the builder a 15-month extension to break ground on the $100-million entertainment and retail center. Council members voted 6 to 1 on Tuesday night to let an Ohio-based company continue with the Queensway Bay project, which has been described as a cornerstone of the city's effort to remake itself into a prime tourist destination.
NEWS
August 5, 1993
It began as a simple request from Councilman Alan S. Lowenthal: Create a citizens committee to advise city officials on the proposed Queensway Bay development project. But the request got some council members thinking. What do these committees do, anyway? By the end of the discussion Tuesday, Mayor Ernie Kell pledged to review all of the city's nearly 60 commissions, committees and boards. And Vice Mayor Jeffrey A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1996
Long Beach officials have been invited to apply for a federal grant to help pay for a parking structure at the planned Queensway Bay tourist mecca. The city was formally asked to compete for a $6-million Economic Development Administration grant on same day last week that President Clinton visited the city's waterfront to bestow praise on the San Pedro Bay ports.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1996 | JOHN COX
A year after Long Beach officials dubbed it a cornerstone of the city's economic future, the Aquarium of the Pacific is building on its lead to become the first world-class aquarium in Southern California. Construction of the $100-million project is about one-third complete, aquarium executives estimate, with the foundation in place and pipes already reaching out to the Long Beach Harbor for fresh shipments of ocean water.
NEWS
November 24, 1994
Mayor Beverly O'Neill has appointed 16 public and business leaders to the board of directors of a proposed $100-million aquarium. The board will work with developer Kajima International Inc. while the aquarium is being designed and built, then oversee its operation when it is completed, said Robert J. Paternoster, manager of the city's Queensway Bay waterfront development project. The proposed Long Beach Aquarium of the Pacific is expected to anchor the development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2000 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Plans for the Queensway Bay redevelopment project on the Long Beach waterfront have stalled again, threatening to unravel efforts by city officials to remake their downtown into one of the hottest tourist destinations in Southern California. In recent months, two major movie theater chains that were considered anchor tenants have had to bow out or face serious questions about financial viability because they are in bankruptcy court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2000 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opponents and proponents of a $100-million entertainment complex planned for the Long Beach waterfront clashed Thursday during a daylong hearing before state officials charged with overseeing land use along the California shoreline. At issue is whether the controversial Queensway Bay project--an 18-acre mix of restaurants, theaters and retail stores--conforms with state law that regulates what can be built on coastal land owned by the state.
NEWS
August 19, 1993 | EMILY ADAMS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The plan to create a tourist harbor and aquarium over the bones of an old landfill moved one step closer to reality this week when the City Council approved the plan in concept. The project, intended to link downtown with the shoreline and attract more visitors, had been revised to leave the Queen Mary where it is. The proposal still calls for excavating much of Shoreline Aquatic Park and its lagoon, but it would be replaced with smaller greenbelts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1996 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opening a new chapter in the storied history of the Queen Mary, the ship's operator is negotiating with Japanese interests to move Long Beach's best-known icon to Tokyo Bay for at least three years. The negotiations are being conducted by Joseph F. Prevratil, who operates the Queen Mary under a lease from the city, and are being closely followed by municipal leaders, a number of whom are expressing skepticism.
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