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OPINION
January 16, 2014
Re “Apache tribe fights for place in N.M.,” Jan. 14 Reading about the Fort Sill Apache tribe's plight left me with mixed emotions. For federal agents to have forcibly removed tribal members from their ancestral New Mexico homeland more than 100 years ago constitutes an unfathomable travesty. On the other hand, the tribe's intent to open a gambling casino if it returns to New Mexico disappoints me. Studies show that gaming enterprises are far more detrimental than beneficial to the larger society; gambling's social costs outweigh its economic benefits many times over.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
March 28, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The 40-year debate over affirmative action at state universities generally has been conducted in terms of general principles. At first, advocates emphasized the importance of compensating African Americans (and later others) for the effects of generations of discrimination, while opponents contended that the Constitution must be colorblind. Later, the debate shifted to the claim that there are educational benefits to a racially diverse student body, a rationale for preferences that the Supreme Court grudgingly has accepted.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2006
RE "The Showoff and the Showman," March 26: For your readers interested in the search behind the discovery of "The Betrayal of Christ," Jonathan Harr's "The Lost Painting: The Quest for a Caravaggio Masterpiece" reads like a detective novel. The reader is led from a dusty basement archive in Italy to a modest seminary in Dublin, where the painting is located. CAROL AHUJA East Highland
BUSINESS
March 2, 2014 | By Maija Palmer
There is a sense of despair when it comes to privacy in the digital age. Many of us assume that so much of our electronic information is now compromised, whether by corporations or government agencies, that there is little that can be done about it. Sometimes we try to rationalize this by telling ourselves that privacy may no longer matter so much. After all, an upstanding citizen should have nothing to fear from surveillance. In "Dragnet Nation: A Quest for Privacy, Security and Freedom in a World of Relentless Surveillance," author Julia Angwin seeks to challenge that defeatism.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2014 | By Maija Palmer
There is a sense of despair when it comes to privacy in the digital age. Many of us assume that so much of our electronic information is now compromised, whether by corporations or government agencies, that there is little that can be done about it. Sometimes we try to rationalize this by telling ourselves that privacy may no longer matter so much. After all, an upstanding citizen should have nothing to fear from surveillance. In "Dragnet Nation: A Quest for Privacy, Security and Freedom in a World of Relentless Surveillance," author Julia Angwin seeks to challenge that defeatism.
SPORTS
December 17, 2013 | By David Wharton
Heather Mills, the former wife of Beatles singer Paul McCartney, has spent the last two years mounting a serious effort to qualify for the 2014 Paralympic Games in Sochi, Russia. Now, it seems, her quest to make the British ski team has ended. Mills, who had her left leg amputated below the knee after a 1993 accident, announced that she has suffered an injury related to friction with her prosthetic and will not be able to compete in the Games. Her management company said the 45-year-old was “devastated,” according to insidethegames.biz.
BUSINESS
June 8, 2011 | By David Undercoffer, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Nissan nails unconventional. One has only to spend some time driving the all-electric Leaf, the spunky Juke crossover or the anomalous Murano CrossCabriolet to know this is a company that takes risks -- and succeeds from them. So one would think such a forward-thinking carmaker would have no trouble bringing innovation and appeal to the table when it came time to redo something as blase as a minivan. Nope. The Nissan Quest returns to the U.S. for 2011 after a yearlong hiatus.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1989
Ask any black L.A. resident about Johnny's Hot Dog Stand. We have been in operation 33 years, and we sell more pastrami (and also chili dogs) than anyone else in Los Angeles. ELAINE LEWIS Los Angeles
NEWS
November 8, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times
When it comes to fitness, Americans may not be stepping up -- enough. In the quest to log a recommended 10,000 steps a day, Americans trail other countries in daily walking, according to a recent University of Tennessee study . Australia and Switzerland lead the pack with adults taking 9,695 and 9,650 daily steps, respectively, while the U.S. comes in with just 5,117 steps. So let’s not wait until the new year to start making the effort. A pedometer (and not even a fancy one)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013
In Sarah Polley's unconventional documentary, "Stories We Tell," "truth" is a relative term when family secrets are involved. The Canadian actress-writer-director's quest is resolving her parentage. Did she have another father, as childhood teasing suggested, in addition to the beloved Michael Polley, who raised her and thought her his own? Her mother, Diane, died when Polley was 11. Had she lived, perhaps Polley would have had the answer long ago and the film left uncontemplated. In Diane's absence, everyone has opinions - family members, her mother's friends and lovers.
TRAVEL
February 22, 2014 | By Andrew Bender
OKLAHOMA CITY - Oklahoma traces its contemporary history to pioneers who populated the prairies. Now, new urban pioneers are repopulating the capital, Oklahoma City, as restaurateurs re-imagine landmark buildings and create new communities around them. They could hardly have come at a better time: The local economy is booming, and Forbes ranks OKC as the nation's eighth-fastest-growing city, thanks to thriving oil, gas and wind-power sectors as well as fracking. I was here in September for a consulting job, and I extended my stay to find these restaurants with a previous life.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2014 | By Mike Boehm
Since 1946, the San Diego Museum of Art has owned an appealing vision of happy prosperity: Frans Hals' 1630s painting of a plump, rosy-cheeked Dutch merchant whose expression and body language exude confidence, security and bonhomie. In the early 1990s, on one of his infrequent visits to Los Angeles from Europe, Bernard Goodman asked his son, Simon, to take him to see it. Standing in front of the portrait of Isaac Abrahamsz Massa, Bernard for the first time permitted a crack in what his son calls "the brick wall of silence" that had confronted him and his older brother, Nick, all their lives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2014 | By Anh Do
At last, they marched. On Saturday, dozens of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender immigrants marched in the annual Tet parade in Little Saigon. The rainbow flag, a distinctive symbol of gay pride, fluttered alongside emblems of California, the United States and South Vietnam. "We love you," participants yelled at friends, family members and thousands of others lining the parade route in Westminster, many dressed to celebrate the Lunar New Year. "We love you, too," some eager youths responded, whistling with joy. The historic moment followed months of fighting as organizers initially sought to ban LGBT activists from joining one of the community's biggest events.
OPINION
January 16, 2014
Re “Apache tribe fights for place in N.M.,” Jan. 14 Reading about the Fort Sill Apache tribe's plight left me with mixed emotions. For federal agents to have forcibly removed tribal members from their ancestral New Mexico homeland more than 100 years ago constitutes an unfathomable travesty. On the other hand, the tribe's intent to open a gambling casino if it returns to New Mexico disappoints me. Studies show that gaming enterprises are far more detrimental than beneficial to the larger society; gambling's social costs outweigh its economic benefits many times over.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2014 | By Glenn Whipp
You might not peg the guy who wrote "I, Robot" and adapted "The Da Vinci Code" as a self-described "shameless romantic. " But then, when looking back on "A Beautiful Mind," the movie that won him a screenplay Oscar, Akiva Goldsman remembers it as a "promise that love conquers all. " So when Goldsman says that he likes to see the world as "a grown-up fairy tale where nothing is without purpose," it makes perfect sense that 30 years ago, riding the...
OPINION
December 24, 2013 | By Sarah Leah Whitson
Egyptians say the mood is different now. Gone is the call of the revolution demanding justice for the brutal torture and killing of a young man and an end to the police abuse his case exemplified. In its place is a weary, national shrug toward brutal attacks, now that they're directed against the Muslim Brotherhood and its supporters. There is little popular demand for justice and little prospect for accountability. If Egypt's military-backed government can get away with killing more than 1,000 protesters in broad daylight in 2013, what has really changed since the days of Hosni Mubarak?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2011 | By Suzanne Muchnic, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"I see this more as a philosophical exhibition than a history of space and flight," says Stephen White. He's talking about "Skydreamers: A Saga of Air and Space," an expansive show of photographs and related materials — largely drawn from his collection — that's opening Friday at the Autry National Center in Griffith Park and runs through Sept. 4. "I don't know much about the technical aspects of aviation," he says. "What interests me is how photography interacts with what we call progress.
SPORTS
December 17, 2013 | By David Wharton
Heather Mills, the former wife of Beatles singer Paul McCartney, has spent the last two years mounting a serious effort to qualify for the 2014 Paralympic Games in Sochi, Russia. Now, it seems, her quest to make the British ski team has ended. Mills, who had her left leg amputated below the knee after a 1993 accident, announced that she has suffered an injury related to friction with her prosthetic and will not be able to compete in the Games. Her management company said the 45-year-old was “devastated,” according to insidethegames.biz.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
"A Journey to Planet Sanity," Blake Freeman's comedic documentary and purported quest for "truth," proves a tedious, half-baked outing. It mostly plays like a slapdash mockumentary crossed with a bad reality TV show. The engine here is director-star Freeman's mission to make things right for 69-year-old LeRoy Tessina, a food delivery man whose unfounded fear of aliens and ghosts has caused him emotional and financial distress (he's supposedly spent his life savings on psychic guidance, among other forms of "protection" from the paranormal)
Los Angeles Times Articles
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