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OPINION
November 11, 2001 | TODD GITLIN, Todd Gitlin is professor of culture, journalism and sociology at New York University. He is the author of "The Sixties" and the forthcoming "Media Unlimited: How the Torrent of Images and Sounds Overwhelms Our Lives."
Years ago, a student of mine at UC Santa Cruz drove a Volkswagen van with a QUESTION AUTHORITY bumper sticker. One day, somebody scratched out the message. Lately, at a time when some people think loyalty must be demonstrated with a shut mouth, I've been thinking of my former student and her anonymous vandal. Whoever felt the need to crush that young woman's audacity was stomping on democratic ideals, failing to understand that questioning is precisely what authority needs.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2013 | By Susan King
Versatile character actor James Cromwell has always looked askance at authority. "There used to be a bumper sticker that said 'resist authority,'" said Cromwell, best known for his Oscar-nominated supporting turn in 1995's "Babe" as the taciturn farmer who teaches an adorable pig to herd sheep, although he's had memorable roles in such Oscar-winning films as "L.A. Confidential" and "The Artist" and landmark TV series "All in the Family" and "Six Feet Under. " "That has sort have been my byword," said Cromwell, 73, who added that his defiant attitude often got him into trouble in school.
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NEWS
March 31, 1988 | JOSEPH N. BELL
Last week I thanked God that I grew up with radio instead of television. I had a guest speaker at my undergraduate UC Irvine writing class. Arnold Hano is not only a friend but a class act. He has been writing books and magazine articles for major New York publications for more than four decades. He has been deeply involved in local political and social movements. He has a play awaiting production.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2013 | By Anh Do, Kate Mather and Ashley Powers, Los Angeles Times
The rampage began just as the morning commute was getting underway. Over the course of about an hour, authorities say, a 20-year-old college student killed a woman at his Ladera Ranch home and embarked on a string of shootings that stretched through the heart of Orange County, targeting random people during their morning routines. He carjacked a truck at a gas station, police said, then executed a businessman and stole his BMW. A few minutes later, he killed a plumber and took a work truck.
NATIONAL
April 22, 2003 | Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writer
Clay Colt's voice turned soft, filled with nostalgia, as he remembered the day inspiration struck. It was Aug. 8, 1974, and Colt and Kate Donnelly happened to be on the Santa Cruz boardwalk when they heard that Richard Nixon was resigning as president. They celebrated by printing their first bumper sticker: "Jail to the Ex-Chief." That day, the couple launched an enterprise that would carry them into a new century of social activism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1999
We should question authority--starting with our own. WILLIAM C. JONES Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1986
The death of Howard Jarvis saddens me deeply. He gave me the courage to question authority. MICHAEL ANDREW GONZALEZ San Pedro
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1986 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
Seeking to make a political statement and a buck at the same time, a San Diego man has started a telephone service that offers up-to-the-minute advice about beating workplace drug tests. The two-minute tape-recorded message, which a Los Angeles toxicologist said is largely accurate, provides callers with information on the lengths of time that commonly used street drugs stay in the body. It also suggests methods of doctoring urine samples to hide evidence of drug use.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1988 | TONY LIOCE, Orange County Calendar Editor
Seemingly a near-last bastion in these days of "Just Say No," Timothy Leary, pioneer and veteran of the '60s counterculture/drug wars, manned what he called the "pro-choice" battlements Tuesday night at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano. Addressing a mostly rapt, capacity crowd of about 350, the lean, feisty, silver-haired professor of psychology--who became something of a hippie guru after he was thrown off the Harvard faculty for experimenting with LSD 25 years ago--acknowledged, to applause, that with drugs "the further out there you go, the more firmly your feet have to be planted on the ground."
WORLD
January 26, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
It's been called the greatest literary show on Earth, a thinking person's carnival. The Jaipur Literature Festival, which wrapped up Tuesday, is India at its best, and occasionally not-so-best, proving that the proud emerging nation can easily trounce China in at least this category: the soft-power world of ideas, debate, criticism and a willingness to question authority. The festival is a five-day see-and-be-seen brain scrum featuring India's (and increasingly the world's) literati.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2009 | Richard Winton and Andrew Blankstein
Los Angeles Police Department detectives are trying to identify and interview "multiple doctors" who treated or prescribed medication to Michael Jackson going back years, a law enforcement source told The Times. Until now, much of the attention surrounding the pop icon's death has focused on Dr.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2008 | Molly Selvin, Times Staff Writer
Some people think Sam Zell should reread his new employee handbook. During a meeting last week with Orlando Sentinel employees, the Tribune Co. chairman ended his answer to a photographer's questions about hard news coverage by directing a two-word obscenity at her. A video of the meeting made its way to YouTube and on Monday was on the media gossip website Gawker, which described Zell as a "salty billionaire."
WORLD
May 18, 2004 | Paul Richter, Times Staff Writer
The State Department, issuing its annual human rights report, acknowledged Monday that the U.S. military's prison scandal has raised legitimate questions about whether the United States can sit in judgment on other countries' moral records. In light of world outrage over abuses of Iraqi prisoners, it is reasonable to ask whether "Abu Ghraib robs us of our ability to talk about human rights abroad," said Lorne Craner, assistant secretary of State overseeing human rights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2004 | H.G. Reza, Times Staff Writer
Two teenage girls missing since Feb. 20 have been tracked to several addresses and investigators do not believe they were abducted, a Santa Ana police spokesman said Friday. The families of Cristine Chacon and Gissela Flores, both 15, have complained that investigators are not doing enough to find the girls. But detectives are doing everything they can, Officer Mario Corona said. Chacon and Flores, freshmen at Santa Ana High School, went to school Feb. 20 but did not return home.
NATIONAL
April 22, 2003 | Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writer
Clay Colt's voice turned soft, filled with nostalgia, as he remembered the day inspiration struck. It was Aug. 8, 1974, and Colt and Kate Donnelly happened to be on the Santa Cruz boardwalk when they heard that Richard Nixon was resigning as president. They celebrated by printing their first bumper sticker: "Jail to the Ex-Chief." That day, the couple launched an enterprise that would carry them into a new century of social activism.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2008 | Molly Selvin, Times Staff Writer
Some people think Sam Zell should reread his new employee handbook. During a meeting last week with Orlando Sentinel employees, the Tribune Co. chairman ended his answer to a photographer's questions about hard news coverage by directing a two-word obscenity at her. A video of the meeting made its way to YouTube and on Monday was on the media gossip website Gawker, which described Zell as a "salty billionaire."
WORLD
January 26, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
It's been called the greatest literary show on Earth, a thinking person's carnival. The Jaipur Literature Festival, which wrapped up Tuesday, is India at its best, and occasionally not-so-best, proving that the proud emerging nation can easily trounce China in at least this category: the soft-power world of ideas, debate, criticism and a willingness to question authority. The festival is a five-day see-and-be-seen brain scrum featuring India's (and increasingly the world's) literati.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2002 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Hyundai Motor America Co. celebrates its 42% increase in U.S. sales last year, fueled in part by a growing reputation for reliability, the company quietly has been replacing defective engines in early models of its Santa Fe sport-utility vehicle. Revelation of the problem--which involved engine failure, sometimes at highway speeds--has safety advocates again questioning how auto makers and government regulators define safety issues.
OPINION
November 11, 2001 | TODD GITLIN, Todd Gitlin is professor of culture, journalism and sociology at New York University. He is the author of "The Sixties" and the forthcoming "Media Unlimited: How the Torrent of Images and Sounds Overwhelms Our Lives."
Years ago, a student of mine at UC Santa Cruz drove a Volkswagen van with a QUESTION AUTHORITY bumper sticker. One day, somebody scratched out the message. Lately, at a time when some people think loyalty must be demonstrated with a shut mouth, I've been thinking of my former student and her anonymous vandal. Whoever felt the need to crush that young woman's audacity was stomping on democratic ideals, failing to understand that questioning is precisely what authority needs.
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