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October 23, 1994 | Hunter Drohojowska-Philp, Hunter Drohojowska-Philp is chair, department of liberal arts and sciences, Otis College of Art and Design
It was the best of times. It was the worst of times. That's what comes to mind when writing about R.B. Kitaj. The celebrated 61-year-old American artist, who has lived mostly in London since 1957, is being honored for his life's work in a retrospective organized by the Tate Gallery. After unusually high attendance--more than 40,000 visitors--during its summer debut in London, it comes to the L.A. County Museum of Art today as part of the wide-ranging UK/LA celebration.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2008 | Leah Ollman, Special to The Times
R.B. Kitaj followed a strict regimen: Rise at 5, walk to the Westwood Coffee Bean at 6 to write and sketch, return home to paint, eat lunch, rest. Receive visitors for tea at 4, have dinner, retire early. The discipline provided a framework for his restless brush and brilliant, meandering mind.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2007 | Mike Boehm
The Oct. 21 death of artist R.B. Kitaj was a suicide by suffocation, the Los Angeles County coroner has found, saying the artist placed a plastic bag over his head. A note and an empty medicine bottle were nearby when one of Kitaj's sons discovered the 74-year-old painter dead at his home, Capt. Ed Winter, a coroner's spokesman, said Tuesday. Kitaj established his reputation while living as an American in London, where David Hockney became a close friend.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2007 | Mike Boehm
The Oct. 21 death of artist R.B. Kitaj was a suicide by suffocation, the Los Angeles County coroner has found, saying the artist placed a plastic bag over his head. A note and an empty medicine bottle were nearby when one of Kitaj's sons discovered the 74-year-old painter dead at his home, Capt. Ed Winter, a coroner's spokesman, said Tuesday. Kitaj established his reputation while living as an American in London, where David Hockney became a close friend.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2003 | Leah Ollman, Special to the Times
Trend-hungry participants in the art world of the 1980s bought into the idea that originality had exhausted itself, and all that was left for artists was to recycle what had come before. "Appropriation" became a buzzword and hyperbole a favored artistic strategy. Some pretty feeble art was made in the name of high-concept piggybacking. Appropriation seemed to have hit its peak and low point simultaneously.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2007 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
R.B. Kitaj, a figurative American painter who became a significant contributor to the British Pop Art movement during his nearly four decades of expatriate life in London, has died. He was 74. Kitaj died Sunday evening at his home in Los Angeles, according to the Marlborough Gallery, his official representative in New York. The Los Angeles County coroner's office was looking at his death as a possible suicide and conducted an autopsy Tuesday, a coroner's spokesman said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2008 | Leah Ollman, Special to The Times
R.B. Kitaj followed a strict regimen: Rise at 5, walk to the Westwood Coffee Bean at 6 to write and sketch, return home to paint, eat lunch, rest. Receive visitors for tea at 4, have dinner, retire early. The discipline provided a framework for his restless brush and brilliant, meandering mind.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1994 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
The art of American expatriate painter and draftsman R.B. Kitaj is under review in a full-dress retrospective of more than 100 works at the County Museum of Art. Organized for LACMA by Stephanie Barron, the museum's coordinator of curatorial affairs, it originated at London's Tate Gallery and will travel to New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art. Its catalogue is handsome.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2003 | Louise Roug, Times Staff Writer
R.B. Kitaj lives in Westwood, in a house surrounded by white roses. He receives visitors only after 4 p.m., and when he opens the door promptly on the hour, the painter inspires the mild trepidation associated with a job interview. Kitaj appears aloof, even haughty. He isn't. But his increasing deafness doesn't invite questions, and his white beard and stern features give him the appearance of a Bergman patriarch.
NEWS
August 25, 2005 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
SOMEWHERE between a dorm-room poster of Monet's waterlilies and the Robert Rauschenberg painting owned by Eli Broad is another level -- the beginnings of an art collection that can be built by anyone with a few grand to spend.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2007 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
R.B. Kitaj, a figurative American painter who became a significant contributor to the British Pop Art movement during his nearly four decades of expatriate life in London, has died. He was 74. Kitaj died Sunday evening at his home in Los Angeles, according to the Marlborough Gallery, his official representative in New York. The Los Angeles County coroner's office was looking at his death as a possible suicide and conducted an autopsy Tuesday, a coroner's spokesman said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2003 | Louise Roug, Times Staff Writer
R.B. Kitaj lives in Westwood, in a house surrounded by white roses. He receives visitors only after 4 p.m., and when he opens the door promptly on the hour, the painter inspires the mild trepidation associated with a job interview. Kitaj appears aloof, even haughty. He isn't. But his increasing deafness doesn't invite questions, and his white beard and stern features give him the appearance of a Bergman patriarch.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2003 | Leah Ollman, Special to the Times
Trend-hungry participants in the art world of the 1980s bought into the idea that originality had exhausted itself, and all that was left for artists was to recycle what had come before. "Appropriation" became a buzzword and hyperbole a favored artistic strategy. Some pretty feeble art was made in the name of high-concept piggybacking. Appropriation seemed to have hit its peak and low point simultaneously.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1994 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
The art of American expatriate painter and draftsman R.B. Kitaj is under review in a full-dress retrospective of more than 100 works at the County Museum of Art. Organized for LACMA by Stephanie Barron, the museum's coordinator of curatorial affairs, it originated at London's Tate Gallery and will travel to New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art. Its catalogue is handsome.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1994 | Hunter Drohojowska-Philp, Hunter Drohojowska-Philp is chair, department of liberal arts and sciences, Otis College of Art and Design
It was the best of times. It was the worst of times. That's what comes to mind when writing about R.B. Kitaj. The celebrated 61-year-old American artist, who has lived mostly in London since 1957, is being honored for his life's work in a retrospective organized by the Tate Gallery. After unusually high attendance--more than 40,000 visitors--during its summer debut in London, it comes to the L.A. County Museum of Art today as part of the wide-ranging UK/LA celebration.
NEWS
December 25, 2007
Kitaj obituary: The obituary of figurative painter R.B. Kitaj in the California section Oct. 24 did not list two surviving sisters, Karma Kitaj and Dr. Madeleine Kitaj. It also was stated that Kitaj's father abandoned the family. In fact, his mother left her husband.
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