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ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2009 | David L. Ulin, Ulin is book editor of The Times.
The Book of Genesis Illustrated R. Crumb W.W. Norton: 224 pp., $24.95 How do we read R. Crumb's "The Book of Genesis Illustrated"? It seems a contradiction: a sober reconstruction by a man who admits he "[does] not believe that the Bible is 'the word of God.' " And yet, the further we get into this electrifying adaptation, the more it all makes sense. If you remove divinity from the equation, "Genesis" becomes a human creation -- "a powerful text," in Crumb's words, "with layers of meaning that reach deep into our collective consciousness, our historical consciousness, if you will."
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2010 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Harvey Pekar, the Cleveland comic book author who made prickly honesty about everyday life into an artistic credo and whose outward aspect of dour dishevelment masked a passionate, elegant intellect, has died. He was 70. Pekar was found dead early Monday by his wife, writer Joyce Brabner, at home in Cleveland Heights, Ohio, said Powell Caesar, a spokesman for the Cuyahoga County coroner's office. An autopsy will be conducted to determine cause of death. Best known for his sporadic, dyspeptic and largely autobiographical comic series "American Splendor," which started in 1976 and later inspired a feature film, Pekar forged a distinct authorial voice — and a popular persona — that fused caustic and frequently self-lacerating wit, Rust Belt stoicism, casual bohemianism and shrewd observations about quotidian human existence.
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OPINION
May 21, 2005
Maybe it's just me, but without question The Times has crossed the line of decency with its publishing of the self-portrait cartoon by R. Crumb (Commentary, May 16). The cartoon describes the "Seven Chakras" of Crumb, a depiction of this old man with arrows and labels pointing to his crotch describing the conditions ("anal-obsessiveness, sex obsession, perversion, fetishism, sadomasochism") of his mental state. The once venerable Times appears willing to go to any length to increase its subscriber rate.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2009 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, ART CRITIC
Cartoons have been art's most common language going on 50 years, ever since Roy Lichtenstein painted Mickey Mouse and Edward Ruscha conjured Little Orphan Annie. Make that 140 years if you believe (as I do) that the brushy, broken, unfinished-surface look of Impressionist paintings was derived from the oil sketches that artists of the French Academy used to map out the slick, highly finished surfaces of their often grandiose canvases. They called those preparatory sketches cartoons, and the Impressionists latched onto their raw energy.
OPINION
November 19, 2006 | Aline Kominsky Crumb, Cartoonist ROBERT CRUMB lives in the south of France with ALINE KOMINSKY CRUMB, his wife of 30 years. His latest book, "The Sweeter Side of R. Crumb," was published last month by MQ Publications Ltd.
As a child, my husband, Robert, already felt like an alienated old man (top left). He longed for the past, never having actually known what he was nostalgic for. It was as if he were born in the wrong time. He never felt part of the contemporary culture. You can see the roots of his alienation already beginning. You can see from this drawing (bottom left) how out of sync Robert was -- awkward, sensitive, nerdy.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2009 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, ART CRITIC
Cartoons have been art's most common language going on 50 years, ever since Roy Lichtenstein painted Mickey Mouse and Edward Ruscha conjured Little Orphan Annie. Make that 140 years if you believe (as I do) that the brushy, broken, unfinished-surface look of Impressionist paintings was derived from the oil sketches that artists of the French Academy used to map out the slick, highly finished surfaces of their often grandiose canvases. They called those preparatory sketches cartoons, and the Impressionists latched onto their raw energy.
BOOKS
December 7, 1997 | CHARLES SOLOMON, Charles Solomon is the author of, most recently, "The Disney That Never Was: The Stories and Art from Five Decades of Unproduced Animation" (Hyperion)
The creator of Fritz the Cat, Mr. Natural, the "Keep On Truckin' " poster and other late '60s Underground Comix icons, Robert Crumb remains an influential figure in American popular culture. Designer-cartoonist Peter Poplaski has compiled an overview of his life and career, drawing on material from decades of comic books, graphic art and sketch books. In his autobiographical notes, Crumb avoids the embarrassing details about his life and tastes that were exposed in the recent documentary "Crumb."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1989 | KRISTINE McKENNA
"The instant I realized I was an outcast I became a critic, and I've been disgusted with American culture from the time I was a kid," says R. Crumb, the underground cartoonist who bequeathed the definitive acidhead mantra to the late '60s: "Keep on truckin'." "I started out by rejecting all the things that the people who rejected me liked, then over the years I developed a deeper analysis of these things." Many who have followed Robert Crumb's work since he launched the underground comics scene in the psychedelic '60s with the seminal publication "Zap Comix" agree that the 44-year-old artist is an uncommonly thoughtful observer of the passing parade.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2009 | Reed Johnson
The artist who gave the comic-book world Mr. Natural, Angelfood McSpade and Fritz the Cat has a new cast of characters: Adam, Eve, Noah, Abraham and, well, You Know Who. R. Crumb, the Albrecht Dürer of the urban demimonde, has just published "The Book of Genesis Illustrated" (W.W. Norton), a profusely pictorial, surprisingly faithful version of the first 50 chapters of the Old Testament. In theory, the project may strike some as perverse, like having Charles Bukowski pen the script for a remake of "It's a Wonderful Life."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2010 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Harvey Pekar, the Cleveland comic book author who made prickly honesty about everyday life into an artistic credo and whose outward aspect of dour dishevelment masked a passionate, elegant intellect, has died. He was 70. Pekar was found dead early Monday by his wife, writer Joyce Brabner, at home in Cleveland Heights, Ohio, said Powell Caesar, a spokesman for the Cuyahoga County coroner's office. An autopsy will be conducted to determine cause of death. Best known for his sporadic, dyspeptic and largely autobiographical comic series "American Splendor," which started in 1976 and later inspired a feature film, Pekar forged a distinct authorial voice — and a popular persona — that fused caustic and frequently self-lacerating wit, Rust Belt stoicism, casual bohemianism and shrewd observations about quotidian human existence.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2009 | Reed Johnson
The artist who gave the comic-book world Mr. Natural, Angelfood McSpade and Fritz the Cat has a new cast of characters: Adam, Eve, Noah, Abraham and, well, You Know Who. R. Crumb, the Albrecht Dürer of the urban demimonde, has just published "The Book of Genesis Illustrated" (W.W. Norton), a profusely pictorial, surprisingly faithful version of the first 50 chapters of the Old Testament. In theory, the project may strike some as perverse, like having Charles Bukowski pen the script for a remake of "It's a Wonderful Life."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2009 | David L. Ulin, Ulin is book editor of The Times.
The Book of Genesis Illustrated R. Crumb W.W. Norton: 224 pp., $24.95 How do we read R. Crumb's "The Book of Genesis Illustrated"? It seems a contradiction: a sober reconstruction by a man who admits he "[does] not believe that the Bible is 'the word of God.' " And yet, the further we get into this electrifying adaptation, the more it all makes sense. If you remove divinity from the equation, "Genesis" becomes a human creation -- "a powerful text," in Crumb's words, "with layers of meaning that reach deep into our collective consciousness, our historical consciousness, if you will."
OPINION
November 19, 2006 | Aline Kominsky Crumb, Cartoonist ROBERT CRUMB lives in the south of France with ALINE KOMINSKY CRUMB, his wife of 30 years. His latest book, "The Sweeter Side of R. Crumb," was published last month by MQ Publications Ltd.
As a child, my husband, Robert, already felt like an alienated old man (top left). He longed for the past, never having actually known what he was nostalgic for. It was as if he were born in the wrong time. He never felt part of the contemporary culture. You can see the roots of his alienation already beginning. You can see from this drawing (bottom left) how out of sync Robert was -- awkward, sensitive, nerdy.
OPINION
May 21, 2005
Maybe it's just me, but without question The Times has crossed the line of decency with its publishing of the self-portrait cartoon by R. Crumb (Commentary, May 16). The cartoon describes the "Seven Chakras" of Crumb, a depiction of this old man with arrows and labels pointing to his crotch describing the conditions ("anal-obsessiveness, sex obsession, perversion, fetishism, sadomasochism") of his mental state. The once venerable Times appears willing to go to any length to increase its subscriber rate.
BOOKS
December 7, 1997 | CHARLES SOLOMON, Charles Solomon is the author of, most recently, "The Disney That Never Was: The Stories and Art from Five Decades of Unproduced Animation" (Hyperion)
The creator of Fritz the Cat, Mr. Natural, the "Keep On Truckin' " poster and other late '60s Underground Comix icons, Robert Crumb remains an influential figure in American popular culture. Designer-cartoonist Peter Poplaski has compiled an overview of his life and career, drawing on material from decades of comic books, graphic art and sketch books. In his autobiographical notes, Crumb avoids the embarrassing details about his life and tastes that were exposed in the recent documentary "Crumb."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1989 | KRISTINE McKENNA
"The instant I realized I was an outcast I became a critic, and I've been disgusted with American culture from the time I was a kid," says R. Crumb, the underground cartoonist who bequeathed the definitive acidhead mantra to the late '60s: "Keep on truckin'." "I started out by rejecting all the things that the people who rejected me liked, then over the years I developed a deeper analysis of these things." Many who have followed Robert Crumb's work since he launched the underground comics scene in the psychedelic '60s with the seminal publication "Zap Comix" agree that the 44-year-old artist is an uncommonly thoughtful observer of the passing parade.
NEWS
August 7, 1994
Tony Mostrom calls his vision of Hollywood Boulevard a lament for a lost love. "I've lived (in Los Angeles) all my life," says the 36-year-old free-lance cartoonist, whose work has graced the pages of Heavy Metal and R. Crumb's Weirdo magazines. "I used to enjoy going to Hollywood Boulevard. I don't enjoy it anymore." Mostrom misses strolling Hollywood and browsing its bookshops. He worked on the boulevard and once lived at Yucca and Cahuenga ("one of the worst corners").
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2010
Underground comics legend Gary Panter -- best known for his "ratty line" drawing style and Emmy Award-winning production design for "Pee-wee's Playhouse" -- will give a lecture in conjunction with the Hammer's current exhibition "The Bible Illuminated: R. Crumb's Book of Genesis," focusing on the influence of the Sunday funnies and comic books on contemporary art, and vice versa, culminating in today's iconographic "feedback loop" linking high- and...
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