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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2000
A former political consultant who is a key fund-raiser for USC has been appointed director of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library, the fourth director in its nine-year history. R. Duke Blackwood, who has pledged to raise the library's profile in part by improving its ties to the academic community, will assume stewardship of the library on June 19, said chief archivist John Carlin.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2001 | STEVE CHAWKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sometimes the ball falls short, even for the Gipper. The Simi Valley City Council decided this week to pass on adopting "Home of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library" as the city's slogan. The move had been urged by Barbra Williamson, a council member who handles advertising and marketing for a local bank. "It's really too bad," she said. "It could've been the Nixon library, the Clinton library, the Franklin D. Roosevelt library--it really doesn't matter whose library it was.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2004 | Gregory W. Griggs, Times Staff Writer
Staking its claim as capital of "Reagan Country," Simi Valley this week adopted a new slogan linking the city to the late 40th president. The City Council voted unanimously Monday night to use the motto "Home of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library" on city letterhead, marketing materials and a welcome sign at a major city intersection. "Having the library in our city is a pride thing," Mayor Bill Davis said Tuesday. "Why not have it on your stationery and on your city signs?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2004 | Amanda Covarrubias, Times Staff Writer
They came quietly Monday to gaze upon the curved, limestone memorial that marks the gravesite of former President Reagan. After a week of mourning, visitors continued to pay homage to the nation's 40th president and his widow, Nancy, on the first day the grave at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library near Simi Valley has been available for public viewing. Reagan died June 5. All the tributes and speeches were over.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2004 | Gregory W. Griggs, Times Staff Writer
With the rolling Simi Hills serving as a backdrop worthy of a classic western, Nancy Reagan joined hundreds of well-wishers Friday at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library to celebrate her husband's 93rd birthday and to unveil the cornerstone for a new $20-million exhibit hall. More than 600 people, young and old, gathered at the north end of the hilltop complex near Simi Valley for a brief ceremony and a glimpse of the former first lady.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2002 | RODNEY BOSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since acquiring the Air Force One used by the former president, officials at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library near Simi Valley have been preparing for a $20-million expansion to showcase the retired aircraft. The new Air Force One pavilion and a separate auditorium and gallery will more than double the size of what is already the largest presidential library in the country. Groundbreaking is scheduled for next month, with the "flying White House" exhibit set to open in May 2004.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2004 | Daryl Kelley, Times Staff Writer
The morning after Ronald Reagan died, 82-year-old stone carver Nathen Blackwell of Ventura got a wake-up call from the presidential library near Simi Valley. Library officials were scrambling to prepare the hilltop burial site personally chosen by the nation's 40th president as his final resting place. They wanted to know how to replace a discolored bronze presidential seal mounted on a limestone wall with a black granite one Blackwell had carved.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2001 | JENIFER RAGLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a recent weekday at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum, fifth-grader Edwin Mendoza's eyes were opened to the 19th-century world of Queen Victoria. At the same time, J.J. Albert, a 22-year-old Cal Lutheran University senior, was poring over once-private documents on the 40th president's immigration policy for his final project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2001 | JENIFER RAGLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a recent weekday at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum, fifth-grader Edwin Mendoza's eyes were opened to the 19th-century world of Queen Victoria. At the same time, J.J. Albert, a 22-year-old Cal Lutheran University senior, was poring over once-private documents on the 40th president's immigration policy for his final project.
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