Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsR Gordon Mcgovern
IN THE NEWS

R Gordon Mcgovern

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
November 2, 1989 | From Reuters
Campbell Soup Co. said Wednesday that its chief executive was retiring early, and the news sparked renewed takeover speculation, sending the company's stock sharply higher. Campbell's stock shot up $3.125 to $46.875 on the New York Stock Exchange. The latest sign of turmoil at the Camden, N.J.-based soup maker revived the takeover rumors swirling around the company since the death in April of its patriarch, Chairman John Dorrance Jr., the son of the company's founder. The resignation of R.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
November 2, 1989 | From Reuters
Campbell Soup Co. said Wednesday that its chief executive was retiring early, and the news sparked renewed takeover speculation, sending the company's stock sharply higher. Campbell's stock shot up $3.125 to $46.875 on the New York Stock Exchange. The latest sign of turmoil at the Camden, N.J.-based soup maker revived the takeover rumors swirling around the company since the death in April of its patriarch, Chairman John Dorrance Jr., the son of the company's founder. The resignation of R.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
January 3, 1990 | Associated Press
David W. Johnson, chief executive officer of Michigan-based Gerber Products Co., has been named chief executive officer of embattled Campbell Soup Co., the companies announced today. Meanwhile, Alfred A. Piergallini was elected chairman, president and chief executive of Gerber to succeed Johnson. Campbell began searching for a new chief executive long before R. Gordon McGovern, 63, announced his early retirement in November.
BUSINESS
November 1, 1989 | From Reuters
Campbell Soup Co. said today its chief executive, R. Gordon McGovern, has decided for personal reasons to take early retirement, sparking renewed takeover speculation and sending its stock sharply higher. Campbell's stock shot $3.375 higher to $47.125 on the New York Stock Exchange. The new sign of turmoil at the Camden, N.J.-based soup maker revived the takeover talk that has surrounded the company since the death in April of its patriarch Chairman John Dorrance Jr.
BUSINESS
January 4, 1990 | Staff and Wire Reports
David W. Johnson, chief executive at Gerber Products Co., has been named chief executive of Campbell Soup Co., as the food products company moves to squash speculation it will be sold. Johnson is the first outsider selected to head the company in its 120-year history. He replaces R. Gordon McGovern, who announced his early retirement in November after serving as president and chief executive since 1980.
BUSINESS
December 29, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The family that has controlled the Campbell Soup Co. for more than a century and made its red-and-white soup cans a common sight in the nation's cupboards has split over ownership of the giant food maker. Three nieces of Campbell's late chairman, John T. Dorrance Jr., and their husbands on Thursday said they want to sell their 17% stake in Campbell.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1989 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
Campbell Soup Co., the giant food company whose advertising campaigns for hot soup evoke images of cozy dining, on Thursday announced that it will cut its work force by 2,800 as part of a major corporate streamlining. Campbell, which has about 48,000 workers, said it was only the second layoff--but by far the largest--in the 120-year history of the company, which has a reputation of being among the most paternalistic in the food industry.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1985 | Associated Press
For more than a century, the corporate strategy at Campbell Soup was as bland and consistent as its tomato soup. A few years ago, however, it began aggressively introducing new products, a move that increased profits and kindled excitement within the company. But Wall Street analysts and even Campbell's president think the 115-year-old enterprise may have become too adventurous.
BUSINESS
July 4, 1986 | MARTHA M. HAMILTON, The Washington Post
All-American Campbell Soup is taking on the Japanese--as a competitor and as a role model. Since 1980, the Japanese share of the market for soups in the United States has grown from almost nothing to 9%, with products produced by Japanese companies taking a growing share of supermarket shelf space. Nissin Foods, maker of Oodles of Noodles, is the largest Japanese producer of soups for the U.S. market.
BUSINESS
November 5, 1989 | James Flanigan
They're back--unfortunately. The stock market last week cheered evidence that takeovers will continue, barely two weeks after prices fell on fears that acquisitions were a fading force. There was a $3-billion bid in the paper industry as Georgia-Pacific--one of the largest forest products companies at about $10 billion in sales--offered $58 a share for Great Northern Nekoosa, a medium-sized paper company at $4 billion in sales.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|