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July 18, 1989 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
A second former Housing and Urban Development Department official invoked his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination Monday as a congressional investigating committee pressed to obtain further evidence of political favoritism in the awarding of housing grants during the Ronald Reagan Administration. Former HUD official R. Hunter Cushing's refusal to testify immediately brought Democratic demands that he be suspended from his current post in the Commerce Department.
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NEWS
July 18, 1989 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
A second former Housing and Urban Development Department official invoked his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination Monday as a congressional investigating committee pressed to obtain further evidence of political favoritism in the awarding of housing grants during the Ronald Reagan Administration. Former HUD official R. Hunter Cushing's refusal to testify immediately brought Democratic demands that he be suspended from his current post in the Commerce Department.
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NEWS
July 9, 1989 | RONALD J. OSTROW and DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writers
On the night of April 22, 1988, about 50 people attended a $1,000-a-plate dinner at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Denver to raise money for an obscure charity called Food for Africa. One of the speakers was Thomas T. Demery, whose position as federal housing commissioner at the Department of Housing and Urban Development gave him sway over millions of dollars in HUD grants and subsidies. Developers and their consultants knew full well that Food for Africa was Demery's favorite charity.
NEWS
July 9, 1989 | RONALD J. OSTROW and DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writers
On the night of April 22, 1988, about 50 people attended a $1,000-a-plate dinner at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Denver to raise money for an obscure charity called Food for Africa. One of the speakers was Thomas T. Demery, whose position as federal housing commissioner at the Department of Housing and Urban Development gave him sway over millions of dollars in HUD grants and subsidies. Developers and their consultants knew full well that Food for Africa was Demery's favorite charity.
NEWS
October 19, 1989 | From Associated Press
A grand jury indicted two Indiana businessmen Wednesday on charges of defrauding federal housing programs. The federal indictments were the first in the state from a nationwide probe of theft and political decision-making at the Department of Housing and Urban Development, U.S. Atty. Deborah J. Daniels said. "I would say these two cases are symptomatic of the types of cases you will see across the country in fraud on the government in HUD programs," she said.
NEWS
September 27, 1989 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
In an action without precedent since the Teapot Dome scandal, former Housing Secretary Samuel R. Pierce Jr. Tuesday invoked the Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination, refusing to testify about political favoritism during his eight-year tenure.
NEWS
August 25, 1989 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA, Times Staff Writer
When Thomas T. Demery was new on the job at the Department of Housing and Urban Development in late 1986, he gave a speech introducing himself to his co-workers, outlining what he wanted to accomplish as the assistant secretary in charge of millions of dollars of housing loans. One of the things he rhapsodized about was the agency's coinsurance program, a concept he called "the wave of the future."
NEWS
September 14, 1986 | WENDY LEOPOLD and LARRY GREEN, Times Staff Writers
Silver-haired Rose Louis is moving--reluctantly--from her apartment home of 20 years. There is the clutter of packing boxes in her extra bedroom. "I thought I'd never leave here," she says, with a tear in her eye. "A lot of my nostalgia went down the incinerator." It is a perfect neighborhood for a senior citizen--with a supermarket a block away and public transportation even closer, relatively little crime, and Lake Michigan just two blocks to the east.
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