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NEWS
August 16, 1992 | SHARI ROAN
If the tobacco industry really wants to prevent children and teen-agers from smoking, it would stop advertising to them, argues Dr. Samuel Broder, director of the National Cancer Institute and one of the highest-ranking U.S. health officials. In an editorial in last week's Journal of the American Medical Assn., Broder throws the latest punch in an ongoing war between health officials and tobacco executives about whether cigarette advertising encourages children to smoke.
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BUSINESS
November 29, 1994 | From Times Wire Services
The Supreme Court refused to derail a California lawsuit accusing a cigarette maker of using Joe Camel, a suave cartoon character, to entice children to smoke. The court, acting without comment Monday, turned away arguments by R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. that federal law preempts any such proceeding in a California state court. "We are not surprised; neither are we disappointed," said company spokeswoman Peggy Carter after learning of the court's action.
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NEWS
November 4, 1987 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
Two Philip Morris Inc. officials testified Tuesday that former White House aide Michael K. Deaver was paid $250,000 to counteract false lobbying charges made by another ex-White House aide on behalf of rival cigarette-maker R.J. Reynolds. The testimony at Deaver's perjury trial in federal court touched off angry denials from the Reynolds' lobbyist, Richard V. Allen, who is a former national security adviser to President Reagan. Allen, like Deaver, left the White House to form a consulting firm.
NEWS
July 1, 1994 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a ruling hailed by anti-smoking activists, the state Supreme Court said Thursday that California and its citizens can sue tobacco companies over advertising campaigns that allegedly target teen-agers. The court's decision permits a San Francisco woman to proceed with her lawsuit against the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., which she accuses of improperly wooing children with its Joe Camel mascot, emblazoned on items ranging from T-shirts to beverage can holders.
BUSINESS
November 29, 1994 | From Times Wire Services
The Supreme Court refused to derail a California lawsuit accusing a cigarette maker of using Joe Camel, a suave cartoon character, to entice children to smoke. The court, acting without comment Monday, turned away arguments by R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. that federal law preempts any such proceeding in a California state court. "We are not surprised; neither are we disappointed," said company spokeswoman Peggy Carter after learning of the court's action.
NEWS
July 1, 1994 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a ruling hailed by anti-smoking activists, the state Supreme Court said Thursday that California and its citizens can sue tobacco companies over advertising campaigns that allegedly target teen-agers. The court's decision permits a San Francisco woman to proceed with her lawsuit against the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., which she accuses of improperly wooing children with its Joe Camel mascot, emblazoned on items ranging from T-shirts to beverage can holders.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2004
The 4th District Court of Appeal in California upheld the dismissal of a class-action lawsuit against several cigarette makers, including R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., alleging they exposed minors to cigarette advertising and marketing.
MAGAZINE
September 18, 1994 | MICHAEL J. GOODMAN, Contributing editor Michael J. Goodman's last article for the magazine was a profile of Dodger catcher Mike Piazza. Julia Franco provided research assistance for this article
War. Mighty tobacco against the U.S. surgeon general, the Food and Drug Administration, federal and state and local politicians, the media, the no-smoking crusaders, lawyers for dead and dying cigarette smokers. Attacks against cigarette makers grew more ferocious this year. Tobacco's skeletons popped out monthly in media exposes and in testimony before Rep. Henry A. Waxman's congressional committee hearings.
NEWS
May 4, 1988
A widow whose husband smoked and died of lung cancer can pursue a wrongful death lawsuit against a tobacco company and a retailer that sold cigarettes, the Minnesota Court of Appeals ruled. A three-judge panel unanimously overturned a district court ruling in May, 1987, that Ann Forster's claim was preempted by the Federal Cigarette and Advertising Act. In March, 1985, Mrs. Forster and her husband, John, sued R. J. Reynolds Co., makers of Camel cigarettes, and Erickson Petroleum Corp.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Dozens of women's and public health organizations called on R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. to remove from the market its Camel No. 9 cigarettes, a brand they say is cynically aimed at getting young, fashion-conscious women and girls to start smoking. The claim was denied by an R.J. Reynolds spokesman.
NEWS
August 16, 1992 | SHARI ROAN
If the tobacco industry really wants to prevent children and teen-agers from smoking, it would stop advertising to them, argues Dr. Samuel Broder, director of the National Cancer Institute and one of the highest-ranking U.S. health officials. In an editorial in last week's Journal of the American Medical Assn., Broder throws the latest punch in an ongoing war between health officials and tobacco executives about whether cigarette advertising encourages children to smoke.
NEWS
November 4, 1987 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
Two Philip Morris Inc. officials testified Tuesday that former White House aide Michael K. Deaver was paid $250,000 to counteract false lobbying charges made by another ex-White House aide on behalf of rival cigarette-maker R.J. Reynolds. The testimony at Deaver's perjury trial in federal court touched off angry denials from the Reynolds' lobbyist, Richard V. Allen, who is a former national security adviser to President Reagan. Allen, like Deaver, left the White House to form a consulting firm.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1999 | Reuters
Four tobacco companies are the targets of an action brought by French regional health insurer CAPM. The decision by the tribune of Saint Nazaire to allow the suit, the first like it in France, follows several legal cases in the United States. The companies are Seita of France, Rothmans Inc. of Canada and American firms Philip Morris Cos. and R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a unit of RJR Nabisco Holdings Corp.
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