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R J Reynolds Tobacco Corp

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BUSINESS
April 20, 2000 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sailing into uncharted waters, R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. said Wednesday that it will begin making explicit health claims in advertisements for Eclipse cigarettes, stating that the low-smoke brand may reduce the risk of three major smoking-related diseases--cancer, bronchitis and emphysema--while creating less secondhand smoke. The announcement by RJR Chairman Andrew J.
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BUSINESS
April 20, 2000 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sailing into uncharted waters, R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. said Wednesday that it will begin making explicit health claims in advertisements for Eclipse cigarettes, stating that the low-smoke brand may reduce the risk of three major smoking-related diseases--cancer, bronchitis and emphysema--while creating less secondhand smoke. The announcement by RJR Chairman Andrew J.
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NEWS
March 8, 1998 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In a devastating defeat for the tobacco industry, a Minnesota judge Saturday ordered the nation's major cigarette companies to turn over 39,000 confidential documents that they waged a long, bitter and expensive battle to keep secret. The judge ruled that the papers show evidence of crime or fraud.
NEWS
March 8, 1998 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In a devastating defeat for the tobacco industry, a Minnesota judge Saturday ordered the nation's major cigarette companies to turn over 39,000 confidential documents that they waged a long, bitter and expensive battle to keep secret. The judge ruled that the papers show evidence of crime or fraud.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1998 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
State attorneys general and tobacco industry representatives are getting close to consummating a $200-billion agreement that would settle massive lawsuits in 36 states, say sources close to the negotiations. The agreement would also provide monetary compensation to 10 other states. The tobacco industry already has settled with four states for a total of $41 billion. Washington Atty. Gen.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1997 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The tobacco industry engaged in "a conspiracy of silence and suppression of scientific research," the judge in Minnesota's massive lawsuit against the industry has concluded in a decision issued Tuesday. The judge said he reached this conclusion after reviewing a representative sample of 864 documents that the industry has been attempting to keep secret. The documents include a 1955 industry memo describing a study interpreted by several of the industry's "better . . .
NEWS
February 10, 1999 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The tobacco industry suffered a legal defeat late Tuesday when a San Francisco jury found Philip Morris liable for the lung cancer of a longtime smoker and awarded her $1.5 million in compensatory damages, an amount that may rise when deliberations resume today on her request for punitive damages. Tobacco companies have settled a number of major cases, but the verdict for Patricia Henley, 52, of Los Angeles is the first victory for a plaintiff in a California smoking and health case.
BUSINESS
October 17, 1997 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The tobacco industry encountered major new legal problems Thursday as two massive lawsuits seeking the recovery of billions of dollars spent treating sick smokers by the federal Medicaid, Medicare and veterans programs were filed in federal court in Wichita, Kan. The suits were filed by individuals, acting on behalf of federal taxpayers. The cases are analogous to those filed by 41 state attorneys general seeking recompense for expenditures the states made treating sick smokers.
NEWS
November 20, 1999 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
State and local governments cannot prohibit outdoor tobacco advertising, a federal appeals court in San Francisco ruled Friday. The 3-0 decision by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals said such bans are illegal because they are preempted by a 1965 federal law regulating cigarette advertising and labeling. That law forced manufacturers to put health warning labels on cigarette packages but did not ban outdoor advertising.
BUSINESS
October 21, 1999 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tobacco companies suffered a jarring defeat Wednesday in a ruling by a Florida appeals court that raises the likelihood of a multibillion dollar punitive damages award in a landmark class-action case. The ruling means that the same civil jury that already found cigarette makers guilty of fraud and conspiracy may now award damages in a lump sum to an immense class of sick and deceased Florida smokers numbering in the hundreds of thousands, as opposed to awarding damages to one claimant at a time.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2000 | Bloomberg News
The last two weeks have brought some much-needed good news for investors in U.S. tobacco stocks. Philip Morris Cos. and other cigarette makers scored legal victories against union health-benefit funds and the country of Guatemala, which sought compensation for the costs of treating sick smokers. Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp.'s chief executive, Nick Brookes, said the industry will fight a similar effort by the U.S.
NEWS
April 14, 1996 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The mysterious Federal Express package that catapulted Stanton Glantz from professor of medicine to defender of free speech arrived, unsolicited, on May 12, 1994. Whoever sent it had a sense of humor: The return address was listed as "Mr. Butts," the pro-smoking Doonesbury cartoon character. To the UC San Francisco scientist, the contents were priceless--4,000 pages of confidential documents from the Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp., the nation's third-largest tobacco company.
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