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NEWS
February 25, 1994 | RONALD J. OSTROW and MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In his first extensive public comments on the scandal rocking his agency, CIA Director R. James Woolsey acknowledged Thursday that discovery of what officials say is a Kremlin "mole" in the agency represents a "very serious" internal security breach and said a special commission is examining possible changes. Woolsey, facing sometimes sharp questions from the House Intelligence Committee, said he shares lawmakers' concerns that the spying controversy surrounding veteran CIA officer Aldrich H.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1998 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Denouncing a "stain on the honor of this country," former CIA Director R. James Woolsey was formally added Friday to the legal team representing six Iraqi dissidents whom the U.S. government is trying to deport as security risks. The nation's former top intelligence official, now an attorney in Washington, met with the six men at the Immigration and Naturalization Service detention center in San Pedro and presented each with a copy of the Koran.
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NEWS
December 23, 1992 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
R. James Woolsey, the man President Clinton has chosen to be director of central intelligence, does not exactly fit the image of a spymaster in a John LeCarre novel: Indeed, he has served in virtually every kind of national security job except that of spy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1998 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former CIA Director R. James Woolsey said Friday that he has agreed to help represent six Iraqis who worked to overthrow Saddam Hussein in a U.S.-backed coup but now face deportation to their homeland from Los Angeles. Woolsey, now a Washington attorney in private practice, said he was approached for help in the case after a U.S. immigration judge in Los Angeles ruled last week that the exiles "pose security risks to the United States." The order by Judge D.D.
NEWS
December 29, 1994 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just as he was beginning to rejuvenate the beleaguered Central Intelligence Agency, R. James Woolsey is leaving it at perhaps one of its most critical times. The nation's spy network, heralded during the darkest days of the Cold War, has been scorched by the espionage scandal involving Aldrich H. Ames and humiliated by widespread allegations of sexual harassment and male clubbiness.
NEWS
October 11, 1989 | From Associated Press
President Bush said Tuesday that he will nominate R. James Woolsey, Navy undersecretary in the Carter Administration, as chief U.S. negotiator on talks to reduce conventional forces in Europe.
NEWS
December 29, 1994 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
CIA director R. James Woolsey, under fire for months for his handling of the Aldrich H. Ames spy case and lacking strong support in the White House and Congress, resigned abruptly on Wednesday. The nation's first post-Cold War spy chief never forcefully seized control of a sprawling, $30-billion-a-year intelligence bureaucracy and was not seen by his own employees or by his overseers on Capitol Hill as a strong advocate of intelligence programs.
NEWS
February 2, 1993 | From Associated Press
President Clinton's nominee to head the CIA, R. James Woolsey, will face demands for cheaper and more accurate intelligence when he goes before senators at a confirmation hearing today. But no roadblocks to approval of his nomination are in sight. There will be unusually tight security at the Senate Intelligence Committee hearing, prompted by concern about the fugitive killer of two CIA employees near an agency gate last week.
NEWS
January 11, 1995 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On his last day as the nation's top spymaster, departing Director of Central Intelligence R. James Woolsey came under sharp fire Tuesday when he said that he could not assure the American public that an espionage scandal like the recent Aldrich H. Ames spying case will not recur. On Capitol Hill to brief lawmakers on the CIA's annual assessment of world threats to U.S.
NEWS
April 22, 1994 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee complained Thursday that CIA Director R. James Woolsey is fostering a "cult of protectiveness" at the agency that allows potential security threats to thrive and could impede reforms needed in the wake of the Aldrich H. Ames spy case. The criticism from Sen. Dennis DeConcini (D-Ariz.) and similar views expressed by Rep. Dan Glickman (D-Kan.
NEWS
January 11, 1995 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On his last day as the nation's top spymaster, departing Director of Central Intelligence R. James Woolsey came under sharp fire Tuesday when he said that he could not assure the American public that an espionage scandal like the recent Aldrich H. Ames spying case will not recur. On Capitol Hill to brief lawmakers on the CIA's annual assessment of world threats to U.S.
NEWS
December 30, 1994 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dan Glickman, the departing chairman of the House Select Committee on Intelligence, was musing the other day about what it would be like to run the Central Intelligence Agency. Dressed in a red flannel shirt and surrounded by boxes and emptied desks in his Capitol Hill office, he made it clear he never expected the current director of central intelligence--R. James Woolsey--to be leaving any time soon. Still, he toyed with the idea of someday being the nation's top spy.
NEWS
December 29, 1994 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just as he was beginning to rejuvenate the beleaguered Central Intelligence Agency, R. James Woolsey is leaving it at perhaps one of its most critical times. The nation's spy network, heralded during the darkest days of the Cold War, has been scorched by the espionage scandal involving Aldrich H. Ames and humiliated by widespread allegations of sexual harassment and male clubbiness.
NEWS
December 29, 1994 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
CIA director R. James Woolsey, under fire for months for his handling of the Aldrich H. Ames spy case and lacking strong support in the White House and Congress, resigned abruptly on Wednesday. The nation's first post-Cold War spy chief never forcefully seized control of a sprawling, $30-billion-a-year intelligence bureaucracy and was not seen by his own employees or by his overseers on Capitol Hill as a strong advocate of intelligence programs.
NEWS
November 5, 1994 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the aftermath of the Aldrich H. Ames spy case, the U.S. intelligence community is increasingly embattled, criticized by current and former intelligence officials for failing to cope with its weaknesses and with a changing world. Some even wonder whether the CIA will be able to hang on to its preeminent status after a half century of helping shape U.S. involvement in the world. As a result, CIA Director R.
OPINION
July 24, 1994
The Central Intelligence Agency, concedes its director, R. James Woolsey, stands in need of major reform. Its internal culture, especially in the Directorate of Operations, its spying arm, too much resembles a kind of "fraternity" in which "once you're initiated, you're considered a trusted member for life."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1998 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former CIA Director R. James Woolsey said Friday that he has agreed to help represent six Iraqis who worked to overthrow Saddam Hussein in a U.S.-backed coup but now face deportation to their homeland from Los Angeles. Woolsey, now a Washington attorney in private practice, said he was approached for help in the case after a U.S. immigration judge in Los Angeles ruled last week that the exiles "pose security risks to the United States." The order by Judge D.D.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1998 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Denouncing a "stain on the honor of this country," former CIA Director R. James Woolsey was formally added Friday to the legal team representing six Iraqi dissidents whom the U.S. government is trying to deport as security risks. The nation's former top intelligence official, now an attorney in Washington, met with the six men at the Immigration and Naturalization Service detention center in San Pedro and presented each with a copy of the Koran.
NEWS
April 22, 1994 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee complained Thursday that CIA Director R. James Woolsey is fostering a "cult of protectiveness" at the agency that allows potential security threats to thrive and could impede reforms needed in the wake of the Aldrich H. Ames spy case. The criticism from Sen. Dennis DeConcini (D-Ariz.) and similar views expressed by Rep. Dan Glickman (D-Kan.
NEWS
February 25, 1994 | RONALD J. OSTROW and MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In his first extensive public comments on the scandal rocking his agency, CIA Director R. James Woolsey acknowledged Thursday that discovery of what officials say is a Kremlin "mole" in the agency represents a "very serious" internal security breach and said a special commission is examining possible changes. Woolsey, facing sometimes sharp questions from the House Intelligence Committee, said he shares lawmakers' concerns that the spying controversy surrounding veteran CIA officer Aldrich H.
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