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R L Burnside

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October 21, 2001 | Robert Hilburn
This sizzling package is a revelation on two fronts. First, it sweeps away the idea that you can't find bluesmen these days with the passion and authenticity the giants of the genre displayed a half-century or more ago. And second, it shows that his recent studio albums didn't reveal everything there was to know about the 74-year-old former sharecropper.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2013 | By Randall Roberts
Brothers Cody and Luther Dickinson were raised on Memphis blues, soul, R&B and rock 'n' roll. Their late father, Jim, is an unsung hero of rock 'n' roll who worked with, among others Big Star, the Rolling Stones and the Replacements. (Jim's interviews in the documentary “Big Star: Nothing Can Hurt Me” are some of the film's highlights.) For nearly two decades his Grammy-winning sons have explored similar musical terrain while expanding the conversation - no small feat for a music born in these same woods nearly a century earlier.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2001 | MARC WEINGARTEN, Marc Weingarten is an occasional contributor to Calendar
To get an idea of just how far R.L. Burnside has come from the backwoods juke joints of Mississippi, you only have to peek inside the cramped recording studio at Epitaph Records' headquarters in Silver Lake. There, the 74-year-old blues artist is being treated like some septuagenarian Caligula. Two women wearing nothing but knowing smiles flank Burnside and occasionally slip a well-manicured hand through one of his red suspenders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2005 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
R.L. Burnside, the son of a sharecropper who spent 40 years as a musician before his raw, edgy blues sound brought him fame far beyond his Mississippi hill country roots, has died. He was 78. Burnside died Thursday at St. Francis Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., announced Fat Possum, his record label. No cause of death was given, but Burnside had suffered a heart attack in recent years.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2013 | By Randall Roberts
Brothers Cody and Luther Dickinson were raised on Memphis blues, soul, R&B and rock 'n' roll. Their late father, Jim, is an unsung hero of rock 'n' roll who worked with, among others Big Star, the Rolling Stones and the Replacements. (Jim's interviews in the documentary “Big Star: Nothing Can Hurt Me” are some of the film's highlights.) For nearly two decades his Grammy-winning sons have explored similar musical terrain while expanding the conversation - no small feat for a music born in these same woods nearly a century earlier.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2000 | (Marc Weingarten)
Epitaph/Fat Possum. The 73-year-old former sharecropper expands on the boogie-meets-B-boy sound of 1998's "Come On In." It's a rare treat to find a blues album that actually flirts with new ideas and makes them work. Fatboy Slim, "Halfway Between the Gutter and the Stars," Astralwerks. This white Brit's homage to old-school wild style strives for something more than skin-deep sensation, with singers Macy Gray and Bootsy Collins providing a soul-stirring undertow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2005 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
R.L. Burnside, the son of a sharecropper who spent 40 years as a musician before his raw, edgy blues sound brought him fame far beyond his Mississippi hill country roots, has died. He was 78. Burnside died Thursday at St. Francis Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., announced Fat Possum, his record label. No cause of death was given, but Burnside had suffered a heart attack in recent years.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2000 | MARC WEINGARTEN
Burnside's career has taken more twists and turns than the kudzu vine that grows in his Mississippi home of Layfayette County. A former sharecropper, the 73-year-old Burnside eked out a living on the fringes of the blues community for close to 25 years. Then he experienced a resurgence when Fat Possum records released "Too Bad Jim," an album that showcased Burnside's unvarnished mastery of country blues. Since then, Burnside has become a sort of token outsider folk artist for indie rock fans.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2001 | Soren Baker
* * * DMX "The Great Depression" Def Jam DMX always defies the odds. The fiery, scratchy-voiced rapper from Yonkers, N.Y., released two albums in 1998, an unheard-of move, especially for a relative newcomer. Both collections entered the chart at No. 1, thanks to a die-hard following drawn to his lively raps about the struggle between good and evil. DMX's third album, released in 1999, also entered the chart at No.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1998 | STEVE HOCHMAN
* * * R.L. Burnside, "Come On In," Fat Possum/Epitaph. Having helped shepherd Beck's neo-folk-blues into postmodern hip-hop, producer Tom Rothrock delves deep into the Delta to make loopy loops from blues man Burnside's music. It's a great match. The raw material--among the best in unkempt, electric backwoods blues--rolls along like Moroccan trance music.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2001 | Robert Hilburn
This sizzling package is a revelation on two fronts. First, it sweeps away the idea that you can't find bluesmen these days with the passion and authenticity the giants of the genre displayed a half-century or more ago. And second, it shows that his recent studio albums didn't reveal everything there was to know about the 74-year-old former sharecropper.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2001 | Soren Baker
* * * DMX "The Great Depression" Def Jam DMX always defies the odds. The fiery, scratchy-voiced rapper from Yonkers, N.Y., released two albums in 1998, an unheard-of move, especially for a relative newcomer. Both collections entered the chart at No. 1, thanks to a die-hard following drawn to his lively raps about the struggle between good and evil. DMX's third album, released in 1999, also entered the chart at No.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2001 | MARC WEINGARTEN, Marc Weingarten is an occasional contributor to Calendar
To get an idea of just how far R.L. Burnside has come from the backwoods juke joints of Mississippi, you only have to peek inside the cramped recording studio at Epitaph Records' headquarters in Silver Lake. There, the 74-year-old blues artist is being treated like some septuagenarian Caligula. Two women wearing nothing but knowing smiles flank Burnside and occasionally slip a well-manicured hand through one of his red suspenders.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2000 | (Marc Weingarten)
Epitaph/Fat Possum. The 73-year-old former sharecropper expands on the boogie-meets-B-boy sound of 1998's "Come On In." It's a rare treat to find a blues album that actually flirts with new ideas and makes them work. Fatboy Slim, "Halfway Between the Gutter and the Stars," Astralwerks. This white Brit's homage to old-school wild style strives for something more than skin-deep sensation, with singers Macy Gray and Bootsy Collins providing a soul-stirring undertow.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2000 | MARC WEINGARTEN
Burnside's career has taken more twists and turns than the kudzu vine that grows in his Mississippi home of Layfayette County. A former sharecropper, the 73-year-old Burnside eked out a living on the fringes of the blues community for close to 25 years. Then he experienced a resurgence when Fat Possum records released "Too Bad Jim," an album that showcased Burnside's unvarnished mastery of country blues. Since then, Burnside has become a sort of token outsider folk artist for indie rock fans.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2001
Now that R.L. Burnside is "hip" and 74, Marc Weingarten deems him worthy of reportage ("He's Just Glad You Noticed," Feb. 11). Where was Weingarten 25 years ago when Burnside badly needed some notice? Writing about REO Speedwagon? Where are Weingarten's (and for that matter the other Times music writers') articles and reviews about some of the current, great but unknown blues artists who are performing in Los Angeles right now? I guess Weingarten and his colleagues are too busy pumping up the careers of myriad lightweights that will have a cultural and artistic half-life of about 20 minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1999 | STEVE HOCHMAN
*** Various artists, "The Sopranos--Music From the HBO Original Series," Play-Tone/Columbia/Sony Music Soundtrax. The A3's techno-blues "Woke Up This Morning," the opening song of the colorful drama and of this soundtrack album (in stores Tuesday), perfectly evokes the restless dread crippling crime boss Tony Soprano--that vibe continuing with bluesman R.L. Burnside's churning, loop-spiked "It's Bad You Know" to the closing resignation of Eurythmics' "I've Tried Everything."
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