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R L Hymers

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August 21, 1988 | Pat H. Broeske \f7
You've probably read/seen/heard enough already about the furor over "The Last Temptation of Christ." Here's another item about news that might have been: It started with the Rev. R.L. Hymers Jr.--easily the most demonstrative of the protesting fundamentalists. Hymers, pastor of the Fundamentalist Baptist Tabernacle of L.A., put in calls to reporters and editors at the National Enquirer headquarters in Lantana, Fla., and offered the tab an "exclusive."
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1988 | Pat H. Broeske \f7
You've probably read/seen/heard enough already about the furor over "The Last Temptation of Christ." Here's another item about news that might have been: It started with the Rev. R.L. Hymers Jr.--easily the most demonstrative of the protesting fundamentalists. Hymers, pastor of the Fundamentalist Baptist Tabernacle of L.A., put in calls to reporters and editors at the National Enquirer headquarters in Lantana, Fla., and offered the tab an "exclusive."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1988 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
Two evangelical leaders of the protest against Universal Pictures' "The Last Temptation of Christ" disassociated themselves Friday from a series of fundamentalist-led demonstrations in Los Angeles that growing numbers have decried as anti-Semitic in tone. Through airborne banners, statements and graphic protests, the Rev. R.L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1988 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
Two evangelical leaders of the protest against Universal Pictures' "The Last Temptation of Christ" disassociated themselves Friday from a series of fundamentalist-led demonstrations in Los Angeles that growing numbers have decried as anti-Semitic in tone. Through airborne banners, statements and graphic protests, the Rev. R.L.
NEWS
March 10, 1985
The volatile abortion issue triggered angry shouts and finger shaking as more than 200 people on opposing sides conducted simultaneous demonstrations in downtown Los Angeles. The "pro-choice" demonstration was organized by women's rights advocates known as the January 22nd Coalition for Reproductive Rights. Wearing black clothes in mourning for women who died from illegal abortions, they rallied outside the West 9th Street offices of the Right-to-Life League of Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1985
Your story "Marines Say They Were Misled," gives a statement by Marine Corps officer Chuck Henry in which he accuses Mrs. Jeanette Dreisbach of telling them that the 16,400 buried fetuses were "a Vietnam combat veteran." Officer Henry goes so far as to say that Mrs. Dreisbach "lied" to him. Anyone who knows Mrs. Dreisbach finds Henry's statement ludicrous. How could this simple housewife and mother of nine children do such a thing? Incredible! A better explanation is that Henry is afraid of an American Civil Liberties Union reprisal on the Marines and is therefore covering the posterior of his anatomy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1988
As a scholar of African religious beliefs, I have noted the controversy caused by the sacrifice of animals to the divine spirits of Santeria (Metro, Aug. 8). By any definition, Santeria is not a cult. Along with Vodoun in Haiti, and Candomble in Brazil, it is the traditional worship of the Yoruba and other African peoples carried to the New World, just as Christianity and Judaism were carried over and adapted to American realities. Part of the worship service of Santeria involves the sacrifice of animals to the deities, with much the same meaning and in much the same way that animals were sacrificed to Yahweh in the temple in Jerusalem.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1988 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The evangelical picketers were out, 200 strong, on Saturday to help intensify a conservative Christian protest against Universal Pictures' planned release of the film "The Last Temptation of Christ." Christians on the picket line, set up around Universal's studio and headquarters in the San Fernando Valley, called for Lew Wasserman--chairman of MCA Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1988
The Edwards Cinemas, which operates dozens of theaters in Southern California, will not show "The Last Temptation of Christ" because of its "denigrating" portrayal of Jesus, according to chain officials. "We don't want to show a film that is in any way denigrating to the image of Christ," said Jim Edwards III, president of the Newport Beach-based theater chain, the first to announce a boycott of the film. Meanwhile, fundamentalist minister Rev. R. L. Hymers Jr.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1989 | Pat H. Broeske
Those protests over "The Last Temptation of Christ" aren't finished yet--not with Martin Scorsese among those nominated for the Best Director Oscar. Although conservative Christian leader Donald E. Wildmon won't be demonstrating Oscar night, Dr. R. L. Hymers Jr.--pastor of the Fundamentalist Baptist Tabernacle of L.A.--will. Hymers told us he plans to lead an anti-Scorsese protest outside the Shrine Auditorium on March 29.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1988
It is irresponsible for any clergyman to espouse hatred and provoke anti-Semitism. Unfortunately, that is precisely what some have done with regard to the film, "The Last Temptation of Christ." It is hardly surprising that a film about the life and death of Jesus should offend some people. Fictionalized accounts of such sensitive subjects, even when done with great artistic integrity, will inevitably upset some viewers. Given our First Amendment freedoms, those who feel offended have every right to express their anger.
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