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BUSINESS
January 4, 2007
* The average yield for one-year Treasury bills averaged 4.99% last week, up from 4.96% the previous week, the Federal Reserve said. * R.R. Donnelley & Sons Co., the largest North American printing company, agreed to buy Von Hoffmann from Visant Corp. for $412.5 million in cash.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2001
* Quality Systems Inc., a Tustin provider of computer-based management and records systems for medical and dental groups, reported that fiscal fourth-quarter net income more than doubled to $1.2 million, or 19 cents a share, from $549,000, or 9 cents, a year ago. Revenue rose nearly 22% to $10.7 million. * R.R. Donnelley & Sons Co. has renewed its contract to print People, Time and Sports Illustrated through 2006.
BUSINESS
March 28, 1997 | Reuters
Printer R.R. Donnelley & Sons Co., fighting age and racial-discrimination lawsuits, faced further criticism at its annual shareholders meeting for not nominating any minorities to its board. The Rev. Jesse Jackson, speaking from the floor, said the printing company's lack of a black or Latino director is "unacceptable race discrimination." Jackson bought about $2,000 in Donnelley shares in order to participate in the meeting.
BUSINESS
November 10, 2003 | From Reuters
R.R. Donnelley Sons & Co., the printer of TV Guide and Sports Illustrated magazines, agreed to buy Moore Wallace Inc., a Canadian-based company that is the largest provider of forms and labels to corporations, for $2.8 billion in stock. Under the terms of the deal, Moore Wallace shareholders would receive 0.63 share of Chicago-based R.R. Donnelley for each Moore Wallace share held. This values Moore Wallace at $17.66 a share, or $2.8 billion, Donnelley said. R.R.
NEWS
August 17, 1988 | Associated Press
A former stockbroker charged in the insider trading scandal involving leaked copies of Business Week magazine pleaded guilty today to one count of wire fraud. William Dillon, 33, who was dismissed last month from his job at Merrill Lynch & Co. in New London, admitted paying $10 to $30 for advance copies of the magazine to various employees of R. R. Donnelley & Sons Co., which prints Business Week at two plants, one in Old Saybrook.
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