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BUSINESS
November 10, 2003 | From Reuters
R.R. Donnelley Sons & Co., the printer of TV Guide and Sports Illustrated magazines, agreed to buy Moore Wallace Inc., a Canadian-based company that is the largest provider of forms and labels to corporations, for $2.8 billion in stock. Under the terms of the deal, Moore Wallace shareholders would receive 0.63 share of Chicago-based R.R. Donnelley for each Moore Wallace share held. This values Moore Wallace at $17.66 a share, or $2.8 billion, Donnelley said. R.R.
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BUSINESS
May 24, 2001
* Quality Systems Inc., a Tustin provider of computer-based management and records systems for medical and dental groups, reported that fiscal fourth-quarter net income more than doubled to $1.2 million, or 19 cents a share, from $549,000, or 9 cents, a year ago. Revenue rose nearly 22% to $10.7 million. * R.R. Donnelley & Sons Co. has renewed its contract to print People, Time and Sports Illustrated through 2006.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2001 | Bloomberg News
R.R. Donnelley & Sons Co. said its profit this year will fall further than expected and the company will cut 250 more jobs by the end of the month as demand for commercial-printing services lags. Earnings will be $1.60 to $1.75 a share before items and restructuring charges, down from earlier estimates of $1.95 to $2.10 and the $2.11 a share it earned last year. Actions taken this year will result in a 5% reduction in the company's work force to 33,000, a spokeswoman said.
BUSINESS
November 10, 2003 | From Reuters
R.R. Donnelley Sons & Co., the printer of TV Guide and Sports Illustrated magazines, agreed to buy Moore Wallace Inc., a Canadian-based company that is the largest provider of forms and labels to corporations, for $2.8 billion in stock. Under the terms of the deal, Moore Wallace shareholders would receive 0.63 share of Chicago-based R.R. Donnelley for each Moore Wallace share held. This values Moore Wallace at $17.66 a share, or $2.8 billion, Donnelley said. R.R.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2001 | Bloomberg News
R.R. Donnelley & Sons Co. said its profit this year will fall further than expected and the company will cut 250 more jobs by the end of the month as demand for commercial-printing services lags. Earnings will be $1.60 to $1.75 a share before items and restructuring charges, down from earlier estimates of $1.95 to $2.10 and the $2.11 a share it earned last year. Actions taken this year will result in a 5% reduction in the company's work force to 33,000, a spokeswoman said.
BUSINESS
February 4, 1991 | From United Press International
Fourth Man Admits Guilt in Insider Trading Case: A fourth defendant pleaded guilty to insider trading charges involving the use of pre-released information from a Business Week magazine column. Pacific Palisades resident Lawrence Small, who pleaded guilty to two securities violations in federal court, grossed at least $57,000 on stocks he purchased based on the inside information in 1987. Small faces a maximum of 10 years in prison and a $500,000 fine, prosecutors said.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sears Catalogue Printer May Lay Off 660: The nation's largest commercial printer said it will likely lay off 660 employees as a result of Sears, Roebuck & Co.'s decision to discontinue most of its catalogue operations. R. R. Donnelley and Sons Co., which prints Sears catalogues, said it will close a 65-year-old plant on Chicago's South Side and relocate production to other facilities.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1990 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Securities and Exchange Commission on Tuesday filed civil insider trading charges against a former Orange County stockbroker and an ex-employee of a Torrance printing plant in the wake of the 1988 Business Week magazine insider trading scandal. In the fifth insider trading lawsuit to result from the scandal, the SEC sued Brian J. Callahan, formerly a broker in the Anaheim office of Prudential-Bache Securities, and William N.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2001
* Quality Systems Inc., a Tustin provider of computer-based management and records systems for medical and dental groups, reported that fiscal fourth-quarter net income more than doubled to $1.2 million, or 19 cents a share, from $549,000, or 9 cents, a year ago. Revenue rose nearly 22% to $10.7 million. * R.R. Donnelley & Sons Co. has renewed its contract to print People, Time and Sports Illustrated through 2006.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1998 | Associated Press
R.R. Donnelley & Sons has agreed to spend $425,000 to make salaries for women and minorities equal to those of other employees. Under an agreement with the Labor Department, the commercial printer will pay $252,832 in back pay and salary adjustments to 29 women and minorities. The rest of the money will go toward upgrading procedures and creating incentives for managers to improve affirmative action, the Labor Department said.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sears Catalogue Printer May Lay Off 660: The nation's largest commercial printer said it will likely lay off 660 employees as a result of Sears, Roebuck & Co.'s decision to discontinue most of its catalogue operations. R. R. Donnelley and Sons Co., which prints Sears catalogues, said it will close a 65-year-old plant on Chicago's South Side and relocate production to other facilities.
BUSINESS
February 4, 1991 | From United Press International
Fourth Man Admits Guilt in Insider Trading Case: A fourth defendant pleaded guilty to insider trading charges involving the use of pre-released information from a Business Week magazine column. Pacific Palisades resident Lawrence Small, who pleaded guilty to two securities violations in federal court, grossed at least $57,000 on stocks he purchased based on the inside information in 1987. Small faces a maximum of 10 years in prison and a $500,000 fine, prosecutors said.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1990 | From Times staff and wire reports
A government attorney told a federal jury in Los Angeles Wednesday that a former Orange County stockbroker and a Torrance printer knew that they were breaking insider trading laws when they used advance information from Business Week to make profits in stock trades. Defense lawyers argued that Brian J. Callahan, a former stockbroker for Prudential-Bache Securities Inc. in Anaheim, and William N. Jackson, a one-time printer for R. R.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1990 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Securities and Exchange Commission on Tuesday filed civil insider trading charges against a former Orange County stockbroker and an ex-employee of a Torrance printing plant in the wake of the 1988 Business Week magazine insider trading scandal. In the fifth insider trading lawsuit to result from the scandal, the SEC sued Brian J. Callahan, formerly a broker in the Anaheim office of Prudential-Bache Securities, and William N.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1988 | Associated Press
Printer R. R. Donnelley & Sons has fired three more production workers that it believes helped leak advance copies of an influential Business Week column to a stockbroker, a company official said Wednesday. The firings late last week of three workers at Donnelley's Old Saybrook, Conn., plant brought to seven the number of Donnelley employees who have either been fired or resigned in connection with the company's investigation.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1998 | Associated Press
R.R. Donnelley & Sons has agreed to spend $425,000 to make salaries for women and minorities equal to those of other employees. Under an agreement with the Labor Department, the commercial printer will pay $252,832 in back pay and salary adjustments to 29 women and minorities. The rest of the money will go toward upgrading procedures and creating incentives for managers to improve affirmative action, the Labor Department said.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1989 | From Staff and Wires Reports
A former salesman for the company that prints Business Week magazine formally entered a guilty plea Thursday to conspiring to trade on advance information about stocks mentioned in the magazine's influential "Inside Wall Street" column. As reported, Shayne Walters, 32, of Laguna Hills, agreed in August to plead guilty to charges in the Business Week case. He also pleaded guilty to perjury for lying under oath to an investigator of the Securities and Exchange Commission.
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