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R R Donnelley Sons

BUSINESS
October 24, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Stocks were broadly lower Wednesday for a third straight day, as profit taking continued amid concerns about future corporate earnings growth. Meanwhile, in Europe, German central bank officials set a negative tone for markets there by suggesting that no more interest rate cuts will be forthcoming. On Wall Street, the Dow Jones industrials ended down 25.34 points at 6,036.46, although they bounced back from a 60-point midday loss.
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BUSINESS
October 24, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Stock prices fell Wednesday for a third straight day as traders sold shares of companies that reported or projected less-than-spectacular profits. The Dow Jones industrial average closed down 25.34 points at 6,036.46, paring an intra-day loss of more than 60 points. Stocks and bonds improved after word that the U.S. Treasury had auctioned $12.5 billion of five-year notes at 6.325%, the lowest rate since April 24.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1988 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
The investigation of pre-publication leaks from Business Week magazine zeroed in on two targets Thursday, including a Southern California office of Prudential-Bache Securities. An official at Prudential-Bache, a New York-based brokerage firm, confirmed reports from sources Thursday that one of the firm's Southern California offices had handled some of the suspicious trading.
BUSINESS
July 17, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
AT&T Corp. faced another crisis of leadership and direction Wednesday after President John Walter resigned because the company backed out of its promise to make him chairman and chief executive. Walter, 50, joined the nation's largest phone company eight months ago following a prolonged search for a successor to Chairman Robert Allen as chief executive. Walter, who had been CEO of R.R. Donnelley & Sons Co.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1988 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
The government may face a tough job building a case against those who have profited from advance information on what was being published in a stock column in Business Week magazine, securities law experts say.
BUSINESS
August 2, 1988 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
Repercussions from the growing stock trading scandal involving a Business Week column widened again Monday as an employee in the Torrance plant where the magazine is printed was suspended and another in Connecticut was fired. Meanwhile, the number of brokerage firms conducting investigations of the scandal grew to at least eight. Paine Webber, Integrated Resources, Quick & Reilly and Charles Schwab & Co.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2006 | From Times Wire Services
Stocks climbed to a three-month high Wednesday as the smallest increase in consumer prices since February and a drop in crude oil futures reassured investors that the Federal Reserve was taming inflation. The inflation numbers sent bond yields sharply lower as investors bet that the Fed was finished with its two-year campaign of interest rate hikes. The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note fell to 4.86% from 4.93% on Tuesday.
BUSINESS
October 31, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Stock prices pulled back Tuesday as investors, uneasy about a drop in consumer confidence, traded cautiously before an impending decision on interest rates by the Federal Reserve. After the Fed's half-point reduction in September, most investors expect the central bank to deliver a quarter-point cut at the conclusion today of its two-day meeting. But inflation remains a threat. Oil prices fell Tuesday, but only after hitting a record a day earlier, and the dollar has been tumbling.
BUSINESS
August 13, 1988 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
The Business Week insider trading scandal touched the magazine's own staff for the first time as the publication fired its radio broadcaster Friday for violating the magazine's code of ethics. Business Week spokeswoman Mary McGeachy identified the employee as S. G. (Rudy) Ruderman, 62, who broadcast daily business reports on four radio stations.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2005 | From Reuters
Investors will look this week to the Chicago purchasing managers index and the February payroll report to assess the economy's health, strategists and traders said. Tensions in the Middle East also will get renewed attention on Wall Street in the wake of a fatal bombing outside a Tel Aviv nightclub that shattered a de facto truce by militants, which had raised hopes for peace.
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