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OPINION
September 2, 2008
The Bush administration seems to be trying to run out the clock on its resistance to Congress' legitimate request to have present and former officials testify about White House involvement in the still murky firing of nine U.S. attorneys in 2006. A federal appeals court should reject this maneuver. It has been a year and half since Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) expressed concern about the firing of a handful of U.S. attorneys, including Carol Lam, the prosecutor in San Diego whose pursuit of former Rep. Randy "Duke" Cunningham (R-Rancho Santa Fe)
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NATIONAL
June 10, 2006 | Tom Hamburger, Times Staff Writer
A senior aide to House Appropriations Committee Chairman Jerry Lewis (R-Redlands) received nearly $2 million in departure payments from a Washington lobbying firm when he returned to Capitol Hill to work for Lewis, who is now under federal investigation for ties to that firm. The payments to the aide, Jeffrey Shockey, were detailed in a financial disclosure report released Friday by Shockey's lawyers.
NATIONAL
November 25, 2008 | Washington Post
Breaking a logjam of hundreds of clemency requests, President Bush on Monday granted pardons to 14 people and shortened the prison terms of two others. The majority of the felons who won leniency were far from household names. Andrew F. Harley of Falls Church, Va., was pardoned for wrongful use and distribution of marijuana and cocaine after a court-martial by the Air Force Academy in 1985 caused him to forfeit his pay and prompted his dismissal from the service. Leslie O.
NATIONAL
January 20, 2007 | Joel Havemann, Times Staff Writer
Former Rep. Bob Ney (R-Ohio) on Friday became the second member of Congress to draw a prison term for his role in influence-peddling scandals that helped doom the GOP majority on Capitol Hill in November's election. Ney, 52, was sentenced by a federal judge to 30 months in prison followed by two years of supervised release -- during which he is to perform 200 hours of community service. He was also fined $6,000.
NATIONAL
February 14, 2007 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
A defense contractor and a former top-ranking CIA official were indicted Tuesday on corruption charges in a case that also involved bribes to disgraced ex-congressman Randy "Duke" Cunningham. Brent R. Wilkes was charged with bribing Cunningham (R-Rancho Santa Fe) and Kyle Dustin "Dusty" Foggo to get contracts for his San Diego companies. Until he resigned in May amid a federal investigation, Foggo was the CIA's third highest-ranking official, directing the spy agency's daily operations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2005 | From Associated Press
Former Rep. Randy "Duke" Cunningham has submitted his formal resignation letter to Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, asking him to "accept my resignation as one of the many steps I now take to atone for my crimes." "I am resigning from the House of Representatives because I have discredited my high office and the party I love," Cunningham (R-Rancho Santa Fe) wrote in the letter, released Friday by Schwarzenegger's office.
NATIONAL
December 20, 2006 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
Incoming House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-San Francisco) named Rep. Stephanie Tubbs Jones on Tuesday to become chairwoman of the chamber's troubled ethics committee. The committee, formally known as the Committee on Standards of Official Conduct, is expected to be under increased scrutiny in the new Congress. Democrats swept control of Congress in the November elections in part because of corruption allegations against Republicans. Tubbs Jones (D-Ohio) takes over from Rep. Doc Hastings (R-Wash.
NATIONAL
July 18, 2009 | Richard Simon
Those who pore over congressional legislation in search of earmarks often have been guided by the "I know it when I see it" maxim that Justice Potter Stewart made famous when the Supreme Court struggled to define pornography. But now there is an authoritative source they can consult.
OPINION
May 25, 2007
IN ADMITTING TO the House Judiciary Committee that she "crossed a line" by posing political questions to applicants for career positions at the Justice Department, Monica M. Goodling helped explain why she was such a reluctant witness. But the committed conservative who served as White House liaison for Atty. Gen. Alberto R. Gonzales also could have been describing her former boss. He too has crossed a line, albeit a blurrier one.
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