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NEWS
September 18, 1990 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Within hours of Iraq's invasion of Kuwait, R. Richard Newcomb was summoned from his bed in Alexandria, Va., to the White House, where he worked through the night. The pace has slowed only slightly in the five weeks since then. "It's part of the job," Newcomb said during a break between rounds of meetings and phone calls in his spacious but Spartan office overlooking Washington's Lafayette Park. "It's understood that when you need to go around the clock, you do."
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NEWS
September 18, 1990 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Within hours of Iraq's invasion of Kuwait, R. Richard Newcomb was summoned from his bed in Alexandria, Va., to the White House, where he worked through the night. The pace has slowed only slightly in the five weeks since then. "It's part of the job," Newcomb said during a break between rounds of meetings and phone calls in his spacious but Spartan office overlooking Washington's Lafayette Park. "It's understood that when you need to go around the clock, you do."
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BUSINESS
May 7, 1995 | From Associated Press
The federal agency charged with implementing U.S. trade embargoes, under investigation for its own action in several cases, has been stripped of its investigative and enforcement division. Treasury officials said the action was designed to make trade embargo enforcement more efficient and was unrelated to the ongoing investigation of the Office of Foreign Assets Control. OFAC's enforcement division, and its five criminal investigators, will be reassigned to the Customs Service this month.
NEWS
March 25, 1992 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Arab League delegation, testing the sincerity of Libya's offer to turn over two men wanted in the bombing of Pan American Flight 103, flew to Tripoli on Tuesday while the U.S. government kept up its drumbeat of doubts. "History would suggest that we should be skeptical that this is indeed a good-faith offer," said Margaret Tutwiler, the State Department spokeswoman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1992 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid signs that the teddy bear blockade may be weakening, a Santa Barbara nurse whose relief shipment of medicine, used clothing and toys was halted by U.S. officials, will marshal an array of experts today to bolster her crusade to deliver the toys to Iraqi children. Dianne Judice, the nurse who organized the "Teddy Bears for Iraq" humanitarian effort, has argued that the toy critters, by virtue of their therapeutic value, should not be banned from Iraq.
NEWS
March 28, 1992 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of investigation, the U.S. Treasury Department announced Friday that it is freezing the American assets of 46 businesses it says are ultimately controlled by the Libyan government. The 46 multinational firms include key concerns involved in international banking, investment, petroleum and commercial industries. While none of the firms are headquartered in the United States, many are located in countries that are close allies--notably Britain and France, co-sponsors of a pending U.N.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1990 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Civil liberties groups and Vietnam veterans seeking to return to the Southeast Asian country where they fought testified Tuesday for a bill sponsored by Rep. Howard L. Berman (D-Panorama City) that would lift U.S. restrictions on travel to Vietnam, Cuba, North Korea, Cambodia and Libya.
BUSINESS
August 17, 1997 | MICHELE SALCEDO, NEWSDAY
Partagas. Cohiba. Montecristo. Bolivar. Punch. For aficionados, the mere names of Havana cigars conjure fantasies of the ultimate smoke, produced in a country that has transformed tobacco from a crop to a cult and the technique of hand-rolling from a skill to an art. But more and more cigar smokers are not content to merely imagine the delights of a Cuban Cohiba, which can fetch as much as $50. U.S.
NEWS
April 2, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration, seeking to strengthen compliance with the global arms and financial embargo against Iraq, Monday made public the names of 52 firms and 37 individuals that it says have acted, or are acting, as agents and fronts for the Baghdad government. The firms and individuals are part of an international operation through which Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein built his war machine and possibly embezzled his nation's wealth, officials charged.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1991 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Beverly Hills businessman suspected of supplying weapons to Iraqi President Saddam Hussein has become the first target of what the U.S. government says is a sweeping effort to identify and freeze the assets of suspected Iraqi arms merchants operating worldwide. No charges have been filed against Anees Mansour Wadi, an Iraqi national, or his wife, Shamsaban al-Hayderi. But their assets--including a $3.5-million Sunset Boulevard estate and accounts at 11 banks on both coasts--have been frozen.
NEWS
October 16, 2001 | MYRON LEVIN and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Money-laundering experts say that the U.S. effort to deny funds to terrorists by freezing their assets lacked a sense of urgency before Sept. 11, reflecting a failure to appreciate the extent of the terrorist threat.
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