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Rabbi Marvin Hier

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NEWS
July 16, 1986
Secretary of State George P. Shultz has ordered the U.S. Embassy in Damascus to look into the publication of an anti-Semitic book allegedly written by Syrian Defense Minister Mustafa Talas. The book, "The Matzo of Zion," was printed last year in Damascus with the tacit approval of the Syrian government, charged Rabbi Marvin Hier, dean of the Simon Wiesenthal Center for Holocaust Studies in Los Angeles.
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WORLD
August 7, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. State Department said it would revise a portion of its website devoted to "background notes" on Germany after the Simon Wiesenthal Center said it minimized the Holocaust and Germany's role. The department's Bureau of European Affairs said there had been no intent to downplay the Holocaust. Rabbi Marvin Hier, founder and dean of the L.A.
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WORLD
August 7, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. State Department said it would revise a portion of its website devoted to "background notes" on Germany after the Simon Wiesenthal Center said it minimized the Holocaust and Germany's role. The department's Bureau of European Affairs said there had been no intent to downplay the Holocaust. Rabbi Marvin Hier, founder and dean of the L.A.
OPINION
November 14, 2003
Bruce Konviser's Nov. 9 commentary critiques the Wiesenthal Center for exaggerating European anti-Semitism. He is mistaken. A poll commissioned by the Anti-Defamation League last year in five European countries found that 21% of respondents held strong anti-Semitic views. "For the first time since 1945, I am scared," said Elie Wiesel. In another interview, he elaborated, "Wherever I go ... It's all around me. The fact that in Europe, anti-Semitism has become so vicious, so vocal and acceptable, is a cause of great anguish for me."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1999
Re "Rabbi Criticizes Sainthood Plan for WWII Pope," May 14: It is particularly ironic that Rabbi Marvin Hier, who has done much to advance our understanding of the events of the Holocaust and is rightly considered by many a hero for his commitment to this cause, should lash out in anger and, apparently, hatred at the Catholic Church. That he should be represented by such a shallow and, sad to say, prejudiced opinion does him and the entire cause of Jewish-Christian dialogue a terrible disservice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1999
Re "Tribute to a Man Who Hunts the Past," by Rabbi Marvin Hier, Commentary, May 13: Twenty years ago, when I worked for the fledgling Simon Wiesenthal Center, I had the privilege of being in the same room with Simon Wiesenthal and Frank Sinatra. Sinatra said he wished he could rest his head on the pillow of Wiesenthal's accomplishments. What an honor to have shared even a moment in the life of such a brave man dedicated to such a noble task--to make sure the world never forgets. In Wiesenthal we have had a Don Quixote who never abandoned his quest, no matter the odds, and thereby redeemed us all from a very dark time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1988
The Times accurately reported that the Simon Wiesenthal Center has endorsed the $2-billion plan of Israel's Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir to demolish refugee camps in Gaza and the West Bank through an internationally funded plan, which over the course of five years would provide the Palestinian Arabs in these camps with decent housing and improved economic conditions (Part I, Feb. 18). It is unfortunate, however, that The Times chose not to give these equally important points any space.
OPINION
November 14, 2003
Bruce Konviser's Nov. 9 commentary critiques the Wiesenthal Center for exaggerating European anti-Semitism. He is mistaken. A poll commissioned by the Anti-Defamation League last year in five European countries found that 21% of respondents held strong anti-Semitic views. "For the first time since 1945, I am scared," said Elie Wiesel. In another interview, he elaborated, "Wherever I go ... It's all around me. The fact that in Europe, anti-Semitism has become so vicious, so vocal and acceptable, is a cause of great anguish for me."
NEWS
July 19, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Simon Wiesenthal Center, in documents presented to the British government, on Saturday accused a 71-year-old retired mining engineer living in Scotland of participating in the World War II murder of thousands of Jews in Lithuania and Byelorussia, both now part of the Soviet Union.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1990 | JOHN DART, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
The head of West Germany and a Los Angeles rabbi have engaged in an unusual debate by mail about how to allay fears among Jews and others over the possibility that fascism could resurface in a united Germany. The exchange last month between West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl and Rabbi Marvin Hier, founder-dean of the Simon Wiesenthal Center, highlighted a grass-roots concern that has been largely ignored in the public discussions of political leaders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1999
Re "Rabbi Criticizes Sainthood Plan for WWII Pope," May 14: It is particularly ironic that Rabbi Marvin Hier, who has done much to advance our understanding of the events of the Holocaust and is rightly considered by many a hero for his commitment to this cause, should lash out in anger and, apparently, hatred at the Catholic Church. That he should be represented by such a shallow and, sad to say, prejudiced opinion does him and the entire cause of Jewish-Christian dialogue a terrible disservice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1999
Re "Tribute to a Man Who Hunts the Past," by Rabbi Marvin Hier, Commentary, May 13: Twenty years ago, when I worked for the fledgling Simon Wiesenthal Center, I had the privilege of being in the same room with Simon Wiesenthal and Frank Sinatra. Sinatra said he wished he could rest his head on the pillow of Wiesenthal's accomplishments. What an honor to have shared even a moment in the life of such a brave man dedicated to such a noble task--to make sure the world never forgets. In Wiesenthal we have had a Don Quixote who never abandoned his quest, no matter the odds, and thereby redeemed us all from a very dark time.
OPINION
January 29, 1995
Rabbi Marvin Hier's commentary on the Holocaust (Jan. 19) raises some very important issues about Holocaust education. He is, of course, quite correct in calling on us all--Jews and Gentiles alike--to confront the "full memory" of the unspeakable horrors of the Holocaust. It is critical to remember the "silence of the many." It is also critical to recognize how quickly civilized men and women allowed their ignorance, their fears, their prejudices and their hatreds to turn them into willing participants in one of the most horrendous crimes in human history.
MAGAZINE
July 15, 1990 | SHELDON TEITELBAUM and TOM WALDMAN, Sheldon Teitelbaum, a frequent contributor to The Times, is an L.A. correspondent for Cinefantastique. Tom Waldman regularly covers Los Angeles politics for California Journal and other publications.
LAST YEAR, WHEN the Berlin Wall fell and the word reunification was murmured in the halls of power, the American Jewish community held its breath. Nobody had to be reminded of what happened to European Jewry the last time Germany was one. Reluctant to risk sparking world ire by opposing reunification while television transmitted dramatic pictures of the decimated Berlin Wall, most American Jews were content to let the British, French, Poles and Soviets express concern on their own behalf.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1990 | JOHN DART, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
The head of West Germany and a Los Angeles rabbi have engaged in an unusual debate by mail about how to allay fears among Jews and others over the possibility that fascism could resurface in a united Germany. The exchange last month between West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl and Rabbi Marvin Hier, founder-dean of the Simon Wiesenthal Center, highlighted a grass-roots concern that has been largely ignored in the public discussions of political leaders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1988
The Times accurately reported that the Simon Wiesenthal Center has endorsed the $2-billion plan of Israel's Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir to demolish refugee camps in Gaza and the West Bank through an internationally funded plan, which over the course of five years would provide the Palestinian Arabs in these camps with decent housing and improved economic conditions (Part I, Feb. 18). It is unfortunate, however, that The Times chose not to give these equally important points any space.
OPINION
January 29, 1995
Rabbi Marvin Hier's commentary on the Holocaust (Jan. 19) raises some very important issues about Holocaust education. He is, of course, quite correct in calling on us all--Jews and Gentiles alike--to confront the "full memory" of the unspeakable horrors of the Holocaust. It is critical to remember the "silence of the many." It is also critical to recognize how quickly civilized men and women allowed their ignorance, their fears, their prejudices and their hatreds to turn them into willing participants in one of the most horrendous crimes in human history.
NEWS
July 19, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Simon Wiesenthal Center, in documents presented to the British government, on Saturday accused a 71-year-old retired mining engineer living in Scotland of participating in the World War II murder of thousands of Jews in Lithuania and Byelorussia, both now part of the Soviet Union.
NEWS
July 17, 1986
Canada, joining the United States in sharp criticism of an anti-Semitic book attributed to a Syrian official, has called for consultation among the Western allies on a joint response to the publication, a U.S. Jewish leader said. Canadian External Affairs Minister Joe Clark, in a message to the Canadian representative of the Los Angeles-based Simon Wiesenthal Center for Holocaust Studies, called the book "utterly unacceptable," according to Rabbi Marvin Hier, dean of the center.
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