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June 30, 1990 | JOHN DART, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Los Angeles Reform Rabbi Denise Eger had been considering for weeks whether to make public her sexual preference for women. Her decision was made a little easier this week when the annual meeting of the Central Conference of American Rabbis in Seattle overwhelmingly approved a report saying that gay and lesbian rabbis are welcome in the Reform rabbinate.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1990 | JOHN DART, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Los Angeles Reform Rabbi Denise Eger had been considering for weeks whether to make public her sexual preference for women. Her decision was made a little easier this week when the annual meeting of the Central Conference of American Rabbis in Seattle overwhelmingly approved a report saying that gay and lesbian rabbis are welcome in the Reform rabbinate.
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NEWS
December 2, 1988 | From Reuters
Jewish feminists in prayer shawls and skullcaps and carrying a Torah sparked furious protests from ultra-Orthodox rabbis Thursday when they prayed at the Western Wall, Judaism's holiest shrine. "A woman carrying a Torah is like a pig at the Wailing Wall," said Rabbi Meir Yehuda Getz, who is in charge of the site.
NEWS
December 2, 1988 | From Reuters
Jewish feminists in prayer shawls and skullcaps and carrying a Torah sparked furious protests from ultra-Orthodox rabbis Thursday when they prayed at the Western Wall, Judaism's holiest shrine. "A woman carrying a Torah is like a pig at the Wailing Wall," said Rabbi Meir Yehuda Getz, who is in charge of the site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1990 | LYNN O'SHAUGHNESSY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Molly Wasserman walked into Temple Ramat Zion in Northridge Saturday, her 61-year wait was over. "I did a lot of crying," said the 74-year-old grandmother, dressed in some of her finest clothes for the occasion. Twenty-nine other women joined Wasserman in shedding tears of joy. As 800 proud friends and family members watched, the women celebrated their bat mitzvahs, which usually mark a 13-year-old girl's passage into Jewish adulthood.
WORLD
September 22, 2009 | Henry Chu
Liberal Muslim or closet fundamentalist? Peaceful intellectual or militant in sheep's clothing? Tariq Ramadan has been called all these things -- and more -- by his friends and foes. Whatever the truth, the Swiss-born Oxford University professor ranks among the most influential thinkers in the Muslim world. The grandson of the man who founded the radical Muslim Brotherhood, Ramadan drew attention in the United States in 2004 when he was denied a visa to take up a post at the University of Notre Dame because he had given money to a Swiss-based charity that the U.S. later alleged had linked to the militant group Hamas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1996 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hilda Kalir grew up in Germany but managed to leave in 1939, not long after Kristallnacht, "the night of broken glass" that marked the beginning of Adolf Hitler's reign of terror against the Jews. To be sure, Kalir missed out on raising her family and growing old in her hometown of Hamborn on the Rhine River. But she and her husband were among the fortunate--because they survived. They fled first to Jerusalem, where Kalir gave birth to their only child.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1996 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hilda Kalir grew up in Germany and left in 1939, not long after Kristallnacht, "the night of broken glass" that marked the beginning of Adolf Hitler's reign of terror against the Jews. Like scores of Jewish women around her, Kalir, 83, missed out on raising a family and growing old with her husband in her hometown of Hamborn on the Rhine River. Within minutes of the start of World War II, she and her husband fled to Jerusalem, where she later gave birth to their only child.
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