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Rabbit Hole

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2010 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
Miles Teller almost died a few years ago. After spending a few days at a Connecticut music festival, he and two buddies were road tripping home to Florida. Cruising down the highway at 75 mph, Teller's friend tried to switch lanes and nearly hit another vehicle. He jerked the steering wheel back but lost control of the car, which went across three lanes of traffic, into a grass median, and flipped seven times. Teller was thrown 25 feet and awoke covered in blood. "I still have two rocks in my face," the boyish 23-year-old actor said, showing off scars on his chin, neck and shoulder.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Watch out for Taylor Swift when she's quiet. "Silence speaks so much louder than screaming tantrums," says Glamour's 75th anniversary cover girl. "Never give anyone an excuse to say that you're crazy. " Not that she'd be likely to know it if someone on the Internet was calling her crazy - she chooses not to look. No, she's not ignoring the whole Internet, just the parts that seem dangerous to her mental well-being and her health as a songwriter. "I know when not to read an article," the 24-year-old tells the mag. "Is it going to help my day?
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2010
'Rabbit Hole' MPAA rating: PG-13 for mature thematic material, some drug use and language Running time: 1 hour, 32 minutes Playing: In limited release
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt
With its prominent use of CGI and helter-skelter mash-ups of fairy tales from across the literary spectrum, ABC's new fantasy-based drama "Once Upon a Time in Wonderland" is like a "psychedelic romance," said writer and co-creator Edward Kitsis during the Television Critics Assn. press tour in Beverly Hills on Sunday. A spinoff of the 2011 ABC show "Once Upon a Time," which was also created by Kitsis and "Wonderland" co-creator Adam Horowitz, this new show finds the famous Alice (Sophie Lowe)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
A tragedy devastating to experience can feel generic when transferred to the screen, and that, despite everyone's best intentions and an outstanding performance by Nicole Kidman, is what happens with "Rabbit Hole. " Screenwriter David Lindsay-Abaire's play about a married couple trying to cope with the accidental death of their 4-year-old son was nominated for five Tonys and won the Pulitzer Prize in 2007, and it's likely that the intensity and intimacy of the theatrical experience was a factor in its success.
NEWS
January 11, 2011 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
Nicole Kidman is pouring Aaron Eckhart a cup of coffee and trying to remind him how they met. "At a party? It was one of those things in New York where you pass in the night? Stop! You know where we met!" Eckhart shakes his head in bewilderment, a twinkle in his eye. There's the easy camaraderie here of people who have experienced some living together, and indeed they have ? Eckhart and Kidman play spouses and consorts in grief in the drama "Rabbit Hole. " As Becca and Howie Corbett, suburban New Yorkers who have suffered the death of a child, the two actors embarked on a harrowing, human and at times even humorous journey together.
SPORTS
April 9, 2011 | Mark Heisler
And the White Knight is talking backwards/And the Red Queen's "off with her head" . . . If we're a long way from the '60s when the problem was a scourge that wore green, not the red queen scaring Alice in Jefferson Airplane's "White Rabbit," this was the Lakers' season on the other side of the looking glass. Remember Miami routing them here on Christmas? Remember Kobe Bryant promising to kick rear ends at practice, announcing: "You don't just have two rings and say we're satisfied with what we've got. . . . I'm not rolling with that.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2006 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
For a young woman who recently decked a stranger in a bar brawl, lost her job at Applebee's and got knocked up by a guy who's still living with his old girlfriend, Izzy sure has a lot of advice to give. Trying to help her investment-banker brother-in-law sell his house, she urges him to change the robot sheets in the small bedroom. "If you had a kid, would you wanna move into a house where a boy just died?" she asks.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2002 | Steve Carney, Special to The Times
The premise sounds as nonsensical as anything from the pen of Lewis Carroll: a storybook's extraordinary illustrations prompting the creation of a play for radio. But the contemporary art by DeLoss McGraw in the 2001 edition of "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" made the book so popular among listeners when KCRW-FM (89.9) gave it away as a premium last year that station management decided to stage a dramatic reading of the classic children's story.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2002 | Joe Mathews, Times Staff Writer
For us fans, to watch the Angels in the World Series is to walk on Mars, observe cold fusion, land in India with Columbus, or help Schubert finish that symphony. So this is life on the other side of the looking glass. "This doesn't feel real," says Bobby Flores, a 28-year-old corrections officer who watched Game 2 wearing an Angel cap with a halo he fashioned out of a coat hanger and gold paper Christmas ornaments.
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By Adam Tschorn
L.A. Fashion Week's kickoff event, the first day of newcomer Los Angeles Fashion Council's two-day run of presentations and runway shows at the Carondelet House venue in MacArthur Park, was a reminder that the city is home to a considerable amount of talent. Not just in terms of the fashion designers, but also in terms of how those movers and shakers continually  undertake the Sisyphean task of organizing and launching ever newer efforts to showcase them in a way they deserve.
NEWS
September 11, 2012 | By Adam Tschorn
NEW YORK -- Rodarte designers Kate and Laura Mulleavy showed a bejeweled, brocaded and bewitching spring-summer 2013 women's collection during New York Fashion Week. The inspiration: "Fantasy role-playing games," Laura Mulleavy explained backstage after the show. "Especially the '80s versions. " Photos: NYFW Week celebrity sightings The first words out of my mouth -- especially given the metal dragon earrings snaking around the ears of each model -- was "Dungeons & Dragons," but Mulleavy shook her head.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2011 | By Patrick Pacheco, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Reporting from New York — Playwright David Lindsay-Abaire says he never enjoyed bingo, though it was his mother's weekly ritual in their South Boston, or "Southie," neighborhood. He liked going to the racetrack with his working-class father even less. "But these were the things that you could attach hope to," he says, "and that's pretty much what everybody in the neighborhood did. " Hoping the bingo ball will pop their way is certainly what the darkly humorous characters do in "Good People," Lindsay-Abaire's Broadway drama, which returns the Pulitzer-winning playwright ("Rabbit Hole")
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2011 | By Noel Murray, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The King's Speech Weinstein/Anchor Bay, $29.98; Blu-ray, $39.99 Perhaps it's no surprise that this stately English period film took Oscar's big prize –- the motion picture academy notoriously swoons for troubled monarchs. But director Tom Hooper's movie really is impeccably made and well acted, led as it is by Colin Firth's award-winning performance as King George VI. The movie follows his efforts to overcome a debilitating stammer with the help of a progressive therapist (played by Geoffrey Rush)
SPORTS
April 9, 2011 | Mark Heisler
And the White Knight is talking backwards/And the Red Queen's "off with her head" . . . If we're a long way from the '60s when the problem was a scourge that wore green, not the red queen scaring Alice in Jefferson Airplane's "White Rabbit," this was the Lakers' season on the other side of the looking glass. Remember Miami routing them here on Christmas? Remember Kobe Bryant promising to kick rear ends at practice, announcing: "You don't just have two rings and say we're satisfied with what we've got. . . . I'm not rolling with that.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2011 | By Robert Abele, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When it comes to notable secular Easter movies, there's Fred Astaire at the parade with Judy Garland and little else. But with the seasonal ubiquity of candy, eggs and bunnies, it's hardly a shock that an animation company would wring some type of festive, sentimental kids' flick out of so commercially tinged and cute animal-friendly a holiday. The animation/live-action "Hop" — from the producing-writing team behind last year's "Despicable Me," and director Tim Hill, of "Alvin and the Chipmunks" fame — is that very entry, and it's almost unashamedly middle of the road about its intentions.
BOOKS
July 20, 2003 | Michael Harris, Michael Harris is a regular contributor to Book Review.
"Neo-Dickensian" is the adjective Rupert Holmes' publishers suggest to tout his first novel, and it's apt, up to a point. "Where the Truth Lies" is a big, juicy book with pungent dialogue, vivid description, outsized characters, a convoluted plot and no end of jokes. Moreover, Holmes has an affinity for Charles Dickens: He won multiple Tony awards for adapting the Victorian master's unfinished last novel, "The Mystery of Edwin Drood," into a Broadway hit.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2010 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Several of the indie films hoping for Oscar attention are moving beyond the art house to play to mainstream moviegoers. Others are struggling to get there. "Black Swan" and "The King's Speech" significantly expanded their presence nationwide to strong results this weekend, but "Rabbit Hole" is struggling, "127 Hours" is petering out, and "Somewhere" remains a question mark. The Darren Aronofsky-directed ballet drama "Black Swan" is at 1,457 theaters and brought its total this weekend to $29 million, a strong figure for a low-budget film.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
With this being the Chinese Year of the Rabbit, and with "Hop," Russell Brand's tribute to the Easter Bunny, out this weekend, it felt like the right time to get a little hopped up. Bunnies have long been a favorite subject of writers — think Beatrix Potter and Lewis Carroll — and don't forget American folklore's Br'er Rabbit of the Uncle Remus stories. They've had an impact on the big screen as well. So, while Brand romps across theaters as E.B., the son of the Easter Bunny (voiced by Hugh Laurie)
NEWS
January 11, 2011 | By Randee Dawn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In Mike Leigh's "Another Year," Ruth Sheen plays Gerri, a compassionate therapist/mom/wife whose household flows with cheer, food and wine. But toward the end of the film, lonely colleague Mary steps out of line by flirting with Gerri's (much younger) son, then snipes at his new girlfriend. Gerri gives her a quiet but searing what-for. The reaction to that scene has surprised Sheen. "Lots of people have said to me they thought Gerri was very unkind to Mary ? because Mary was, in a sense, pathetic ?
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