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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2010 | By Robert J. Lopez
The Easter bunnies are out in force at Long Beach City College. And not in a good way. The college's liberal arts campus, with its large grassy areas, has historically been a dumping ground for people who no longer want their pet rabbits. School officials, saying that they have had enough, are starting a campaign to reduce the number of the furry creatures on campus. But not in a bad way. By the last count, taken several months ago, well over 300 rabbits were on the grounds, digging holes and chewing their way through thousands of dollars' worth of landscaping.
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FOOD
April 26, 2014 | Noelle Carter
Rabbits "are helping win the war," proclaimed a Los Angeles Times article from 1943. Touted as a patriotic food during World War II, rabbits were raised by thousands of Americans in their backyards. Along with victory gardens, rabbits helped put food on the table when much of the nation's supply was shipped to soldiers overseas and ration stamps provided less at home. But even though rabbit consumption spiked during the war, it all but disappeared afterward. Think rabbit today and your thoughts probably veer to cartoon characters, cereal mascots, Easter and adorable pets.
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NEWS
July 5, 2005
Regarding "A Shot for Freedom?" [June 28]: How sad that the writer feels the best way to celebrate Independence Day is to pick up a weapon and kill something. Marge Hackett Ojai Thanks for the story on the upcoming rabbit season. The rabbits are plentiful this year, and many hunters will be enjoying this simple pleasure. Peter Balwan Glendale
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2014 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
When she was 4, Doris Pilkington Garimara was uprooted from her home in western Australia and sent to a camp for "half-caste" aboriginals, where she grew up believing she had been abandoned and forgotten by her mother. Decades passed before she learned the full story - one that would not only answer painful questions about her past but help Australians understand one of the ugliest chapters in theirs. Pilkington Garimara and her mother belonged to "the stolen generations" - the estimated 100,000 children of mixed aboriginal and white ancestry who by government edict were snatched from their homes and reared in desolate settlements.
NEWS
June 22, 2004 | David Lukas
[ SYLVILAGUS BACHMANI ] In the late afternoon, about the time bats begin to flit about in the deepening dusk, brush rabbits sally forth from hide-outs located deep in the chaparral of California's coastal mountains and Sierra Nevada foothills. Along trails or meadow edges these small rabbits may be extremely abundant, especially in mid-summer when litters of three to six young venture out for the first time.
NATIONAL
February 15, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
Security at Denver International Airport aims to protect cars from vandalism and theft, but there's a new threat at the its expansive parking lot. Ravenous rabbits. Officials say the animals are causing hundreds and sometimes thousands of dollars in damage to cars by devouring the wires under the hood. Officials with the U.S. Agriculture Department's Wildlife Services in the Denver area are removing at least 100 rabbits every month, but the problem persists. The airport is surrounded by prairie, and the rabbits are seeking warmth and food in the parked vehicles.
NEWS
June 14, 1991 | Reuters
Ferrets have been brought in to clear a cemetery near Salisbury in southern England of a colony of rabbits that burrow under the tombstones and eat mourners' floral wreaths, officials said.
WORLD
October 16, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
South African authorities are closing Robben Island for two weeks in November to try to get rid of thousands of rabbits that have overrun the island where Nelson Mandela spent 18 years in prison. Robben Island Museum officials said there is no alternative but to implement a "humane culling program" with local animal welfare groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2013 | By Jean Merl
Los Angeles firefighters rescued animals Monday morning from a burning pet store in East Hollywood. Puppies, rabbits and fish were among those saved after a fire broke out around 6 a.m. in the strip mall housing Kim's Pets & Fish at 1193 N. Vermont Ave. A neighbor told media members that some people tried to steal the puppies as they were being brought out of the burning building. It took firefighters about an hour to douse the flames, which destroyed an attic above the pet store and another business.  It was not immediately clear whether any animals had perished.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1994
The article "Senior Citizens Decry Poisoning of Rabbits," (Oct. 20) makes it sound as if most of the Leisure World residents are in favor of the cottontail rabbits that infest our community. However, 300 petitions represent less than 2% of our population. It's another example of the vocal minority getting all the attention. Several months ago we were literally overrun by rabbits. On one particular lawn you could count four of them every evening. There were another three around and about my house.
NATIONAL
March 11, 2014 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK -- Saajid Badat had been through all the training, from firing weapons while riding a motorcycle to watching dogs and rabbits, trapped under glass, die slow, agonizing deaths as he learned poisoning techniques.    He had laughed with other Al Qaeda members as the self-confessed mastermind of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, scanned a list of tall buildings and crossed out the World Trade Center towers weeks after hijackers had destroyed them.  Now, Badat was ready to carry out Al Qaeda's next big mission, a plan to down two U.S. jetliners using bombs hidden in shoes.
SCIENCE
February 13, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING -- China's Jade Rabbit lunar rover, feared to have suffered some irreparable technical difficulties, may yet have some spring in its step. In late January, Chinese authorities said the rover -- which arrived on the moon in mid-December -- had experienced mechanical abnormalities just before it was to enter a two-week dormancy during the moon's long, frigid night. The moon buggy, anthropomorphized through a microblog account, sent out some bleak but stoic messages about its apparently dire fate: "Masters are working round the clock.
SCIENCE
January 27, 2014 | By Amina Khan
China's Jade Rabbit moon rover experienced a “mechanical control abnormality” over the weekend, according to the official Xinhua news agency, just as it was set to go to "sleep" for the long lunar night. "Goodnight, Earth. Goodnight, humans. " Those were the words in a "first-person" account from the rover's perspective that was published in Chinese state media after the robot experienced some troubling technical difficulties. Officials with China's State Administration of Science, Technology and Industry for National Defense said scientists are now organizing an overhaul, according to state-run CCTV . China's Chang'e 3 spacecraft made headlines last month after becoming the first spacecraft to make a soft landing on the lunar surface in nearly four decades . The last one before that was the Soviet Union's Luna 24 mission, sent to collect samples in 1976.
SCIENCE
December 16, 2013 | By Amina Khan
China's Chang'e 3 spacecraft successfully touched down on the moon and deployed  the "Jade Rabbit" rover, and now the pair have now sent their first images back to Earth. The color photographs, which the rover and lander took of each other, elicited applause from the engineers at Beijing Aerospace Command and Control Center.  The successful touchdown -- the first soft landing in nearly four decades -- prompted NASA's planetary science division to congratulate the Chinese space agency on Twitter.
SCIENCE
December 2, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Welcome to the lunar club, China. A rocket carrying a moon rover blasted off from the Xichang Satellite Launch Center in Sichuan province, southwestern China at 1:30 a.m. local time Monday (9:30 a.m. Sunday Pacific time). The mission, called Chang'e 3, will be the first spacecraft to make a soft landing on the moon since 1976, when the Soviet Union sent up a sample-collecting mission called Luna 24. Chang'e 3 follows two other Chinese lunar missions: Orbiter Chang'e 1 launched in 2007 to take a map of the entire lunar surface, and Chang'e 2 blasted off in 2010 to check out the moon before traveling to other points of interest in space.
SCIENCE
August 14, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
By the light of day, the two transgenic baby rabbits look no different from their non-transgenic siblings -- white, fluffy and very cute. But put the whole litter under a black light, and you'll know exactly which two bunnies are special. They'll be glowing bright , fluorescent green. (For daylight and black-light shots of the transgenic rabbits and their littermates, see the photo gallery above). The glowing bunnies were born this month in a lab at the University of Istanbul.
NEWS
May 5, 1985
Thank you for writing about Dutch rabbits (Pets, April 7). They are truly a joy! We have a steel gray male for a pet. He adds a lot of joy and happiness to our lives. As a matter of fact, we named him Sunshine (Sunny for short) because of the sunshine he adds. As far as I know, however, Dutch rabbits do not have white tails, as indicated in your drawing. I believe that a well-marked Dutch rabbit should have a tail of the dark color. Please tell me if I'm correct in this assumption.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
The pretty little island of Okunoshima is known for two things: It was there that the Japanese military once cooked up chemical weapons, a mission so guarded that the spot did not exist on official World War II-era maps. And it is totally overrun by fluffy bunny rabbits. I ended up in Okunoshima out of love and boredom. My fiance has been living and teaching nearby in the tiny seaside town of Tadanoumi, whose attractions include a 7-Eleven, a FamilyMart and a mom-and-pop tempura spot where my fiance manages to hold conversations about sardine tempura and sacred deer in broken Japanese.
FOOD
August 3, 2013 | Jonathan Gold
If you follow the peregrinations of local Chinese kitchens, you've probably been hearing a bit about Chengdu Taste lately, a new restaurant specializing in the dishes of its namesake city that was pretty much acclaimed as the best Sichuan restaurant in town from the first days of its opening. When I noted the unavailability of an appetizer translated as "Diced Rabbit With Younger Sister's Secret Recipe," the San Gabriel Valley cognoscenti knew what I was referring to even without a mention of the restaurant's name, and I was sent links to recipes, to articles noting the dish's ubiquity in Chengdu and a short biography of the woman who invented it. (According to Fuchsia Dunlop, second-sister rabbit cubes were popular enough to inspire a Chengdu poet to compose an ode in its honor.)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
The pretty little island of Okunoshima is known for two things: It was there that the Japanese military once cooked up chemical weapons, a mission so guarded that the spot did not exist on official World War II-era maps. And it is totally overrun by fluffy bunny rabbits. I ended up in Okunoshima out of love and boredom. My fiance has been living and teaching nearby in the tiny seaside town of Tadanoumi, whose attractions include a 7-Eleven, a FamilyMart and a mom-and-pop tempura spot where my fiance manages to hold conversations about sardine tempura and sacred deer in broken Japanese.
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