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Race Across America Bicycle Race

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SPORTS
August 11, 1989 | STEVE LOWERY, Times Staff Writer
Somewhere in New Jersey, John Marino, a bowlegged ex-baseball catcher with a bad back, climbed off a bike and onto a choice piece of Garden State pavement. After riding across an entire country, and just 60 miles short of his destination--New York City Hall--he had discovered that his attempt to break the transcontinental record he had set the year before had failed. Demoralized, dehydrated, degraded and not at all happy, he found he couldn't pedal another foot.
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SPORTS
July 23, 1998 | MARTIN BECK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seana Hogan is the only woman entered in the Race Across America, but don't for a minute think she won't have competition in this torturous transcontinental bicycle race. Once again, Hogan will be challenging the men when the 17th edition of RAAM rolls out of Irvine today on the way to Savannah, Ga., 2,906 miles to the east. Hogan, the women's division winner in five of the last six nation-spanning races, is hoping to become the first overall winner who happens to be female.
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SPORTS
August 10, 1994 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Scott Fortner sees a map of the United States, his eyes invariably turn to West Virginia, his mind drifts to a foggy night on the Blue Ridge Parkway and the haunting question: Why on earth did I stop? Fortner, a 28-year-old Laguna Niguel resident, had spent 10 days cycling 2,800 miles in the 1985 Race Across America and was about 450 miles away from Atlantic City, N.J., and the finish of a grueling event.
SPORTS
July 23, 1998 | MARTIN BECK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tustin's Lubomir Hristov is qualified to join the solo riders leaving Irvine today in the Race Across America, but you won't find him lined up at the start. He would like to be there, ready to try ultramarathon cycling's ultimate test, riding 2,906 miles to Savannah, Ga., but he cannot spare the time to train enough to prepare for such a challenge. And Hristov tries to ride about 400 miles a week. "To do RAAM," Hristov said, "I would think that would be grossly inadequate."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1989 | Special to The Times
A team of bicyclists that included a San Juan Capistrano man zipped to victory after departing Orange County last weekend in the first cross-country test of high-tech bikes. Another team, featuring Seal Beach bike shop owner Greg Miller, abandoned the race Thursday with about 130 miles to go, despite leading most of the way.
SPORTS
August 5, 1990 | ELLIOTT TEAFORD and STEVE KRESAL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Long-distance bicycling's annual ode to the open road, the Race Across America, begins today. The ninth annual race will take 45 riders of varying ability and motivation 2,922 miles from the start at the Holiday Inn in Irvine to Rousakis Plaza in downtown Savannah, Ga. Thirty-three men, six women and three tandem teams will pass through 10 states, traveling from sea level to more than 10,000 feet in elevation on the nation's back roads.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1995 | ANTONIO OLIVO
At 72, Joe Walker is now living the childhood he says he never had. With youthful exuberance, Walker occasionally skis, plays tennis and rides his bike through his lazy Tarzana neighborhood at least two hours a day. But being a kid isn't just fun and games for Walker. Along with three other 70-somethings he met through a personal ad in Senior World magazine, Walker is training to ride his bike some 3,000 miles this July in the 14th Annual Race Across America. His inspiration?
SPORTS
August 10, 1990 | ADAM STEINHAUER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the number of incoming telephone calls increases at the Downey Cyclery, the headquarters of the Race Across America, Julie Degraffenreid goes to the back of her brother's shop to wake up station supervisor Randy Evans. Evans, of Placentia, will spend nearly 24 hours a day at the bicycle shop during the RAAM, a 2,922-mile trek from Irvine to Savannah, Ga.
SPORTS
August 5, 1990
The ninth Race Across America will take a new, southern course. After the race begins today in Irvine, the cyclists will ride in a pack to Corona, where they will re-assemble for the official start. From there, the racers will pedal to Palm Springs before heading onto Interstate 10 and toward the Arizona border. The route then heads north into southern Utah, east into Colorado, then south to New Mexico before entering Texas. The riders then will travel south to Snyder, Tex.
SPORTS
August 10, 1990 | STEVE KRESAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city of Cone probably means little to most travelers on Texas Route 207. The town has fewer than 300 people, a few broken-down pickups and a handful of small stores, most of them vacant. But to the Race Across America riders, Cone's location makes it memorable. Getting there means they are halfway through the 2,922-mile cross-country bicycle race. Rob Kish of Port Orange, Fla., was the first of the men's leaders to pass through Cone at about noon (PDT) Thursday.
SPORTS
July 23, 1997 | CHRIS FOSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One is a 37-year-old Newport Beach commodities broker who wants to travel across the Pacific Ocean . . . on a bicycle. The other is a 23-year-old snow boarder-turned-sales manager for a mountain bike company. Although Perry Stone and Jeff Estes are competing as a team, they have different agendas. Thursday, they will leave Irvine on the first leg of the 16th Race Across America transcontinental bicycle competition. They will be the only ones in the race to compete on mountain bikes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1995 | ANTONIO OLIVO
At 72, Joe Walker is now living the childhood he says he never had. With youthful exuberance, Walker occasionally skis, plays tennis and rides his bike through his lazy Tarzana neighborhood at least two hours a day. But being a kid isn't just fun and games for Walker. Along with three other 70-somethings he met through a personal ad in Senior World magazine, Walker is training to ride his bike some 3,000 miles this July in the 14th Annual Race Across America. His inspiration?
SPORTS
August 10, 1994 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Scott Fortner sees a map of the United States, his eyes invariably turn to West Virginia, his mind drifts to a foggy night on the Blue Ridge Parkway and the haunting question: Why on earth did I stop? Fortner, a 28-year-old Laguna Niguel resident, had spent 10 days cycling 2,800 miles in the 1985 Race Across America and was about 450 miles away from Atlantic City, N.J., and the finish of a grueling event.
SPORTS
July 29, 1994 | MICHAEL ITAGAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Simply put, cyclist Jim Davis is 62-years young. Although some men his age contemplate retirement, Davis, who works for TRW, isn't interested in slowing down. He is too busy training, trying to figure out how he and his three teammates can complete the 3,000-mile Race Across America in roughly seven days. Finishing this race is an amazing feat in itself, but the RAAM is old hat for Davis. He finished the race as part of an eight-rider team in 1992.
SPORTS
July 23, 1992 | ELLIOTT TEAFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bob Forney is the kind of guy who thinks nothing of riding his bike from his home in Denver to Omaha and back, who once rode to the tiny town of Albany, Tex., merely to find out what the heck a "Fandangle" is, and who is seriously considering giving up ultramarathon cycling to pursue dog mushing in Alaska. Sound as if he's a little different? Perhaps. In a pursuit that seems defined by its eccentricity, Forney, 34, stands out among the crowd.
NEWS
August 18, 1991 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS
It crosses a continent, but the Race Across America operates with little exposure and even less money. Orange County contractor John Marino, founder and director of the 2,930-mile race, estimates the event's annual budget at about $60,000. While many riders spend more than $10,000 on equipment and other preparations, the 1991 winner's purse amounted to about $2,250 in cash, a $500 bicycle and an estimated $3,000 in goods and services coaxed from sponsors.
SPORTS
August 11, 1990 | ELLIOTT TEAFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rodney White opened time station No. 21 at 1:30 a.m. (PDT) Thursday. He was just in time to watch Rob Kish, the leader in the Race Across America, pedal past in the darkness. With a blue magic marker, White wrote down Kish's name and the time he passed on a makeshift leader board. A moment later he picked up a phone and called in Kish's time to RAAM headquarters at the Downey Cyclery. And then White waited. Sometime around 4 a.m.
SPORTS
August 9, 1990 | STEVE KRESAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Race Across America leaders encountered two passes higher than 9,900 feet high Wednesday. Not surprisingly, the rider with the most chances to train in the mountains is the leader. Denver resident Bob Fourney, who has the Rocky Mountains just miles away, was the leader as of 9 p.m. (PDT). He was near Folsum, N.M., 1,172 miles into the race. The 2,922-mile race ends in Savannah, Ga., some time next week.
NEWS
August 18, 1991 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a dark desert road in the hours before sunrise, amateur bicyclist Steve Born slouches toward Congress, Ariz. Sheathed in a white racing suit and aiming east, he has crossed nearly 300 miles of California and Arizona in less than 20 hours. Born's stomach is queasy from liquid meals. His route map shows 2,600 miles yet to ride. But he is content.
SPORTS
August 9, 1991
Cathy Ellis of Cambridge, Mass., won the women's division of the Race Across America, crossing the finish line Thursday in Savannah, Ga., at 3:21 p.m. (PDT). Ellis, 31, finished the 2,930-mile bicycle race in 12 days 6 hours 21 minutes, averaging 10 m.p.h. and 238 miles per day. Second-place Debbie Ann Breaud of Burleson, Tex., is projected to finish at 2:30 p.m. today. It was the first RAAM for each of the four women who started the race July 27 in Irvine.
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