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Race And Class

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2001
Lorenza Munoz's article concerning interracial dating featured in the movie "Save the Last Dance" lacks courage ("The Delicate Dance of an Interracial Love Story," Jan. 12). Munoz says that "because of the potential for controversy, race and class are dicey issues for studios." This is true only when the man is black and the woman is white. If the guy is white and the women are either black, Hispanic or Asian, movie studios don't have any problem showing interracial relationships. The attitude of studio executives is that white men are entitled to date women of all colors, but black, Hispanic and Asian men are not entitled to date white women.
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OPINION
December 5, 2013 | By Douglas Foster
"Isn't Mandela still president?" That startling question came from a homeless teenager in a Cape Town township during an interview in 2007, as I set off around South Africa to explore the meaning of freedom in the lives of young people. At first, I thought Jonathan was pulling my leg. A gangly 17-year-old, he loved to tease outsiders. By then, Mandela had been out of office for eight years, having famously stepped away from power after a single term as president. His successors, Thabo Mbeki and Jacob Zuma, were in the midst of a nasty, enervating battle for control of the ruling party, the African National Congress, and stories about their schism led nearly every newscast.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1999
Re "The Bias of 'Color Blind' Juvenile Justice," Opinion, June 27: Vincent Schiraldi cited studies that found that black youths were "more likely [than their white peers] to be detained, locked up on sentencing or sent to adult prisons, even with other factors equal." Schiraldi rightly notes that "white middle-class youths" are at an advantage in numerous, important ways when they get into legal trouble. But it is not clear whether this is because they are white, because they are middle class or some combination of the two. Race and class are clearly interrelated, but it cannot be assumed that one is a proxy for the other.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
No one can accuse filmmakers Joe Brewster and Michele Stephenson of taking the easy way out. For 13 years they followed the educational lives of two African American boys (one of them their son), amassing more than 800 hours of footage in the process. Edited down to a bit more than two hours, "American Promise," the film that resulted, is a remarkable documentary, though only partially for the reason its creators intended. Though this film does in fact deal with what the filmmakers call the question of "race, class and education for African American boys," it ends up being of as much interest for the personal stories it tells of two young men trying to find their place in the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2012 | By Mark Olsen
A carjacking goes very wrong in "96 Minutes" and the lives of four young people are all set wildly off-course. The feature debut of writer-director Aimee Lagos, the film feels overstuffed and overcooked, as if the filmmaker were trying to get too much out all in one go. Two female college students (Brittany Snow, Christian Serratos) are overtaken by two teenage boys from the rougher side of town. One (Evan Ross) has been struggling to be better than his surroundings, while the other (J. Michael Trautmann)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2012 | By Irene Lacher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Phylicia Rashad, 63, who became famous playing attorney Clair Huxtable in "The Cosby Show," is director of the Ebony Repertory Theatre production of the classic "A Raisin in the Sun," now at the Kirk Douglas Theatre through Feb. 19. She also rejoins Tyler Perry as his character's mother in his new film "Good Deeds," which opens Feb. 24. After appearing as Lena Younger in "A Raisin in the Sun," which won you a Tony, how did you put your stamp...
OPINION
December 14, 1997 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, Jonathan Kirsch is an attorney and author of "The Harlot by the Side of the Road: Forbidden Tales of the Bible" (Ballantine) and an upcoming biography of Moses
One of the dirty little secrets of the American workplace--and a mostly overlooked wrinkle in the firing of basketball player Latrell Sprewell--is the so-called "screamer," a boss who feels at liberty to berate and belittle his employees even if he feels constrained by law or political correctness from making sexual advances or using racial epithets.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2012 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Let us now, in our hearts or with our bodies, do a funky little dance, a cocky little walk, in praise and memory of Sherman Hemsley, who played George Jefferson for a dozen years in the 1970s and 1980s -- and in scattered cameos thereafter -- and died Tuesday at age 74. As a recurring character on "All in the Family," Jefferson served as a kind of counterweight, if not exactly a counterpart, to Carroll O'Connor's Archie Bunker: an irascible, abrasive,...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2011 | By Patrick Pacheco, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Lydia R. Diamond, whose plays often work the intersection of race and class, remembers once posing a hypothetical scenario she knew would prompt heated debate. The 42-year-old African American playwright and teacher contended that if the Obamas had a son and that son became the fiancé of somebody's white daughter, the young woman's family would not be happy, despite the breeding and connections. "My white friends would say, 'No, no, no, you're wrong! Class would trump race,'" she recalls.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1994 | DIANNE KLEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some will be running the Los Angeles Marathon on Sunday because it is there, because it is supposed to be one of those only in L.A. happenings, because somebody told them they had to be kidding at their age, or because they could use a new Mercedes and $15,000 cash. And somewhere in this bobbing sea of 19,000 running shorts will be Roy Wiseman, striding forward for a far more personal cause: Martin Campos and his brother, Salvador.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2013 | Steve Lopez
I'm an unrepentant sucker for a good, lively, mixed-use urban market filled with fresh produce, food stalls, good conversation and other assorted necessities of life. If they rented office space at the Farmers Market at 3rd and Fairfax, I'd take a suite next to Bob's Coffee and Doughnuts, although I'd never get anything done with all the people-watching and schmoozing opportunities. My favorite places in Seattle and Philadelphia are urban markets, and if I can be blunt, any city without a good one isn't worth living in. All of which is to say I'm waiting to see what comes of Los Angeles' downtown treasure, the iconic Grand Central Market, which is undergoing a transformation that could either destroy it or revive it, depending on whom you talk to. The changeover has been in the works for almost a year.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2012 | By Mark Olsen
A carjacking goes very wrong in "96 Minutes" and the lives of four young people are all set wildly off-course. The feature debut of writer-director Aimee Lagos, the film feels overstuffed and overcooked, as if the filmmaker were trying to get too much out all in one go. Two female college students (Brittany Snow, Christian Serratos) are overtaken by two teenage boys from the rougher side of town. One (Evan Ross) has been struggling to be better than his surroundings, while the other (J. Michael Trautmann)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2012 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Let us now, in our hearts or with our bodies, do a funky little dance, a cocky little walk, in praise and memory of Sherman Hemsley, who played George Jefferson for a dozen years in the 1970s and 1980s -- and in scattered cameos thereafter -- and died Tuesday at age 74. As a recurring character on "All in the Family," Jefferson served as a kind of counterweight, if not exactly a counterpart, to Carroll O'Connor's Archie Bunker: an irascible, abrasive,...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2012 | By Irene Lacher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Phylicia Rashad, 63, who became famous playing attorney Clair Huxtable in "The Cosby Show," is director of the Ebony Repertory Theatre production of the classic "A Raisin in the Sun," now at the Kirk Douglas Theatre through Feb. 19. She also rejoins Tyler Perry as his character's mother in his new film "Good Deeds," which opens Feb. 24. After appearing as Lena Younger in "A Raisin in the Sun," which won you a Tony, how did you put your stamp...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2011 | By Patrick Pacheco, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Lydia R. Diamond, whose plays often work the intersection of race and class, remembers once posing a hypothetical scenario she knew would prompt heated debate. The 42-year-old African American playwright and teacher contended that if the Obamas had a son and that son became the fiancé of somebody's white daughter, the young woman's family would not be happy, despite the breeding and connections. "My white friends would say, 'No, no, no, you're wrong! Class would trump race,'" she recalls.
OPINION
March 31, 2007
Re "AWOL in the real drug war," Opinion, March 24 Arianna Huffington is on the money and exposes what this country is all about. Whites would not put up with sending their children to prison on outrageous drug charges. We are long overdue in having a real conversation on race and class as it applies to our criminal justice system. Americans are basically misinformed or lack courage. Whatever the case, we look like a dog chasing its tail. Let us be smart and bring these drugs inside of the law. This will make life better for all of us. CLIFFORD WALLACE THORNTON JR. Hartford, Conn.
NEWS
November 7, 1993 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael Balaoing somehow misplaced the memory, the one that long rested beneath the clutter of alphabets, pledges of allegiance, patriotic songs, theorems, significant dates and locales committed by heart for exams. The memory that has been dimmed by the day-to-day debris of important study--inside the classroom and out.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2000
Re Greg Braxton's story "TV Finds Drama in Interracial Dating" (March 22): Among the 115 episodes of "Head of the Class" produced by Rich Eustis and myself, a good many were stories in which students of different races dated each other, fell in love, fell out of love--all the things teenagers do. We made it a policy never to articulate the obvious fact that these relationships were interracial. We wanted, instead, to leave our young audience with the impression that friendship, understanding and love between races is to be taken for granted, not used as a cheap hook for a "very special episode."
WORLD
January 19, 2007 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
It was perhaps foreseeable that a plan to lock some of Britain's most annoying personalities under the same roof would turn ugly. The defrocked beauty queen, the sniffy Bollywood movie star, the dimwit reality show veteran famous for wondering whether Cambridge was in London -- could it have turned into anything but a catfight? Hardly anybody, though, thought it would turn into an international incident.
NATIONAL
September 7, 2006 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
With several New Orleans schools scheduled to reopen today, scores of parents, children, educators and community activists gathered Wednesday to protest the continued closure of another one: Martin Luther King Jr. Charter School for Science & Technology in the Lower 9th Ward, which has remained unfit for occupation since Hurricane Katrina.
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