Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRace Based
IN THE NEWS

Race Based

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1992
It's really sad to see that the struggle for equal rights has degenerated into this kind of race-based fatuousity. In defending Lee's insistence on African-American reporters as interviewers, Bates is betraying the founding principle, ostensibly, of the civil rights movement that judgments should be based on merit, not color. Besides, why encourage that all-too-common trend of black reporters being ghettoized into black subject matter? JOANNE G. MURPHY Los Angeles
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - Californians who use their credit cards for online purchases would gain some protection, and voters would decide whether the state's public universities could consider race and gender for admissions, under measures passed by the state Senate on Thursday. The Assembly has yet to act on either measure. Responding to cases in which hackers stole personal financial information on millions of credit card users, Sen. Hannah-Beth Jackson (D-Santa Barbara) proposed limiting the details that online merchants may collect from their customers.
Advertisement
OPINION
April 15, 2002
Re "Minority Levels Rebound at UC," April 5: Now that the University of California has achieved its diversity goals and race-based admissions are against the Constitution, why don't we take the next logical step and cease collecting, analyzing and reporting on the obsolete, ambiguous, scientifically discredited, 19th century and racist concept of race. Come to think of it, let's do the same thing with the U.S. census. Robin Purciel Anaheim
NATIONAL
October 13, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - A constitutional challenge to Michigan's ban on college affirmative action, which comes before the U.S. Supreme Court this week, has given California defenders of race-based admissions a second chance to contest the 1996 ban adopted by the state's voters. The Michigan constitutional amendment was modeled on California's Proposition 209, and it forbids the state's universities to give "preferential treatment" to any applicant based on race. "The wording is identical.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2001
Re "White House Backs Race-Based Program," Aug. 11: The dictionary defines "faith" as "confident belief in the truth, value, or trustworthiness of a person, an idea, or a thing." The U.S. is made up of minorities, and most of them have done tremendous jobs of making it financially here. They had faith in the system. And, for all its shortcomings, the system worked for them. When a society favors racial background over talent and desire, that society treads perilously close to communism.
NEWS
June 30, 2002
Re "A Morally Repugnant Act," Orange County Commentary, June 23: Huntington Beach's race-based transfer policy highlights the need for adopting an initiative on racial privacy. It shows that administrators continue to feel comfortable using race as a criterion, despite the passage of Proposition 209. It is encouraging to see the appellate court overturn them, but as long as bureaucrats are permitted to collect this data, we will continue to see discriminatory programs. Most race-based programs collect this information intending to help the disadvantaged.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1995
Re "Our Righteous Self-Image Is a Myth," Commentary, May 21: The column by Benjamin Schwarz was nothing less than a diatribe by an intolerant Anglophobe who surprisingly, as a historian, appears to have only PC knowledge of, and little respect for, this country. His reference to "Americans of Anglo descent who dominate and impose their own culture on the country," reveals only a race-based pathology in his own psyche, and flies in the face of reality. Does he detect any trace of the heritage he despises in Shalikashvili, Panetta, Kantor, Feinstein, Eisenhower, Colin Powell, Roosevelt, Brzezinski, Kissinger, Schwarzkopf or even Stephanopoulos?
OPINION
February 9, 2003
Re "Bush's Opposition to Racial Preferences Gets Big Support," Times Poll, Feb. 6: President Bush's position is fundamentally flawed. The concept of race-based college admissions was never the intent of affirmative action, nor was it the only criterion utilized by the University of Michigan. The university used race as one of its criteria to further its goal of access and obtaining a diverse student population. The accusatory and demonizing position that the president is using is disingenuous and is only meant to garner conservative support.
NEWS
November 6, 1985 | United Press International
A layoff system favoring black teachers over whites in Jackson, Mich., is necessary to remedy past discrimination against minorities, the Supreme Court was told today as it began its review of affirmative action. Jerome Susskind, an attorney representing the Jackson Board of Education, told the justices during oral arguments that the contract clause giving black public school teachers special protection during layoffs was constitutional. "We had just dismantled a segregated system . . .
NEWS
December 1, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal appeals court ruled that the Charlotte, N.C., school system failed to end traces of racial segregation more than three decades after African American parents first won a court order to integrate its public schools. The U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
In the nearly two decades since California voters banned the use of affirmative action in college admissions, the two most competitive University of California schools - UCLA and Berkeley - saw enrollments of black and Latino students plunge and have struggled to recover. The UC system has adopted a number of recruiting and admissions measures to legally work around the 1996 ban, Proposition 209. But the enrollment of these two groups has not completely rebounded. At UCLA, for example, African American freshmen dropped from 7.1% of the class in 1995 to 3.6% last fall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2010
Paul Gutman L.A. judge upheld race-based magnet admissions Paul Gutman, 78, a Los Angeles County Superior Court judge who ruled that L.A. schools could continue using a race-based formula for magnet school admissions, died June 13. The cause was complications from spine surgery, according to his family. Appointed to the bench in 1993 by then-Gov. Pete Wilson, Gutman oversaw criminal cases before serving as a supervising judge of the Van Nuys-based Northwest District. In his 2007 ruling on magnet schools, Gutman wrote that the Los Angeles Unified School District had been ordered "quite clearly and beyond dispute" in 1981 "to employ race and ethnicity to ensure that the magnet schools would in fact be desegregated."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2008 | Mitchell Landsberg
Magnet schools in Los Angeles won a significant court victory Friday when a state appellate panel rejected a lawsuit charging that they violated California's Proposition 209, which outlawed affirmative action in the state. In strong, clear language, the three-judge panel said an organization affiliated with Proposition 209 author Ward Connerly was wrong to claim that the Los Angeles Unified School District could no longer use the race of students as a factor in magnet school admissions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2008 | Joel Rubin, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles Police Department officials, alarmed by the continued rise in the homicide rate this year, sought Tuesday to debunk the notion that racial animosity has been at the heart of many of the killings. A detailed analysis of each of the homicides this year leaves little doubt that race is not the prime factor and that "the most likely suspect is one that looks just like their victim," Deputy Chief Charlie Beck said in a presentation to the department's civilian Police Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2007 | Mitchell Landsberg and Joel Rubin, Times Staff Writers
A Superior Court judge ruled Tuesday that the Los Angeles Unified School District can continue to base admissions to its popular magnet school system on the race of the students, sharply rejecting a conservative legal group's argument that the system violates California law.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2006 | Andrew Blankstein, Times Staff Writer
Four Los Angeles police officers on Friday accused top department officials -- including the former head of the internal affairs bureau -- of discrimination for failing to include them in a new unit to investigate use-of-force incidents. The investigators -- two African Americans and two Latinos -- held a news conference at the Woodland Hills offices of attorney Bradley Gage to announce a lawsuit against the department.
NEWS
November 20, 1998 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The public high school where Benjamin Franklin, John Quincy Adams, Ralph Waldo Emerson and Leonard Bernstein all studied was ordered Thursday to dismantle its race-based admissions policy. The ruling by a federal appeals court here held that Boston Latin School, the country's oldest public school, could no longer maintain admission standards that promote minority attendance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2008 | Joel Rubin, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles Police Department officials, alarmed by the continued rise in the homicide rate this year, sought Tuesday to debunk the notion that racial animosity has been at the heart of many of the killings. A detailed analysis of each of the homicides this year leaves little doubt that race is not the prime factor and that "the most likely suspect is one that looks just like their victim," Deputy Chief Charlie Beck said in a presentation to the department's civilian Police Commission.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|