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September 28, 1999 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some race tracks go for years without a driver fatality. Irwindale Speedway has had two in its first six months. Spectator fatalities were uncommon in recent years until three people were killed by a flying wheel and debris last year at Michigan Speedway. Less than a year later, three people were killed at Charlotte Motor Speedway, again by a wheel that flew into the stands. "Things happen, sometimes," said a prominent NASCAR official who asked for anonymity.
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September 28, 1999 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some race tracks go for years without a driver fatality. Irwindale Speedway has had two in its first six months. Spectator fatalities were uncommon in recent years until three people were killed by a flying wheel and debris last year at Michigan Speedway. Less than a year later, three people were killed at Charlotte Motor Speedway, again by a wheel that flew into the stands. "Things happen, sometimes," said a prominent NASCAR official who asked for anonymity.
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June 18, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The thing Bill Lester would like most this week at Michigan International Speedway is to be treated the same as any other NASCAR Nextel Cup driver. That's not likely, though. Lester, the first black driver to race in the Cup series in 20 years, is hoping to make today's 3M Performance 400 his second start in NASCAR's top series. The Craftsman Truck Series regular was the center of a whirlwind of publicity and hype in March when he qualified 19th for a Cup race at Atlanta Motor Speedway.
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June 21, 1997 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rumbling is getting louder than the race car he drives, and the words sting almost as much as the punches Dale Earnhardt lands on himself. He keeps up his right to ward off others' blows. Larry McReynolds throws haymakers at his mirror. He stands up and sticks out his jaw, Rocky-style, at the critics. Richard Childress jabs, then jabs again at his own picture. He bobs and weaves in front of the naysayers. "I can see light at the end of the tunnel for the three-car," says Childress, the No.
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