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OPINION
April 15, 2014 | Jonah Goldberg
Last week, the president's lap dog blew his dog whistle (a dog whistle, if you didn't know, is coded language intended for a special constituency). Speaking to the National Action Network, Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. said, "The last five years have been defined … by lasting reforms even in the face of unprecedented, unwarranted, ugly and divisive adversity. " He continued: "If you don't believe that, you look at the way - forget about me, forget about me. You look at the way the attorney general of the United States was treated yesterday by a House committee....
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 19, 2014
Re "Holder plays the race card," Opinion, April 15 According to Jonah Goldberg, Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. is guilty of playing the race card because he supposedly inferred that race was behind his ill treatment by a House committee. The divisiveness in Washington that Holder referred to has nothing to do with race. Goldberg then compliments former Atty. Gen. Alberto R. Gonzales for nobly declining to play the race card when he came under fire from Democrats. Gonzales had no cards to play at all, drawing fire from Republicans and Democrats alike for his ineptitude.
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OPINION
September 2, 2012
Re "Dems play the race card," Opinion, Aug. 28 I commend Jonah Goldberg for writing about race in the election. Taking into account American history, it's obvious that the race card has been in play since Day One. Consider the rise of the tea party and its reaction to Obamacare and nearly all of President Obama's other policy pursuits. The degree of outrage has always felt out of sync. By historical standards Obama's policies did little to upend the establishment. So why does the phrase "take back our country" resonate?
OPINION
April 15, 2014 | Jonah Goldberg
Last week, the president's lap dog blew his dog whistle (a dog whistle, if you didn't know, is coded language intended for a special constituency). Speaking to the National Action Network, Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. said, "The last five years have been defined … by lasting reforms even in the face of unprecedented, unwarranted, ugly and divisive adversity. " He continued: "If you don't believe that, you look at the way - forget about me, forget about me. You look at the way the attorney general of the United States was treated yesterday by a House committee....
OPINION
January 12, 2010 | Jonah Goldberg
There is so much to enjoy about the Democrats' Harry Reid problem, and yet I find the whole spectacle horribly depressing. First, let's recap the bright side. The addlepated and vindictive Senate majority leader deserves the grief he's getting for saying -- according to the new book, "Game Change" -- that Barack Obama would make a promising Democratic presidential contender because he's "light-skinned" and can speak "Negro dialect" only when he wants to. Just last month, Reid insinuated that fellow senators standing in the way of "Obamacare" were carrying on the tradition of the racists who stood in the way of civil rights in the 1960s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1995
It is interesting that we become so angry at Johnnie Cochran when he plays the race card but don't get nearly so upset when Pete Wilson does. EDWARD C. MARTIN, Corona del Mar
OPINION
September 16, 2012 | By William McGowan
Myanmar's pro-democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi has extolled Buddhism for allowing her a sense of inner freedom during her 15 years of house arrest. She's also said that Buddhist precepts can guide her country's democratic transition, encouraging reconciliation with the military instead of anger and revenge. But the more nationalistic face of this Buddhist tradition, brought into focus by recent violence directed against Rohingya Muslims in the western state of Rakhine, could yet derail democratic reforms in Myanmar (also known as Burma)
OPINION
March 27, 2012 | Jonah Goldberg
"White Hispanic. " That's how the New York Times, Reuters and other media outlets have opted to describe George Zimmerman, a man who would simply be Hispanic (or Latino in this newspaper) if he hadn't shot and killed 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. The term, rarely if ever used before this tragedy, is necessary in telling the Martin story in a more comfortable way. What's the comfortable way? It's the way the blame for Martin's death belongs squarely at the feet of "the system. " And "the system" is a white thing, don't you know.
OPINION
November 3, 2011
There will be plenty of time to comment on sexual harassment allegations against Herman Cain — a third emerged Tuesday — when all the facts are known. Meanwhile, we're disappointed that the businessman-turned-presidential candidate is playing the race card. It's an unexpected tack for a man who said just last month: "I don't believe racism in this country today holds anybody back in a big way. " Apparently Cain does think his race is a factor in the revelations about the sexual harassment complaints.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2014 | By Robin Abcarian
  Sarah Palin, you have got to be joking. Showing pure contempt for the ideals that the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. embraced, and on the day we have chosen as a nation to celebrate his life, the former Alaska governor chose to make a spectacle of herself on Facebook. This is the entirety of her post : “Happy MLK, Jr. Day! “'I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.' - Martin Luther King, Jr. “Mr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2014 | By Robin Abcarian
  Sarah Palin, you have got to be joking. Showing pure contempt for the ideals that the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. embraced, and on the day we have chosen as a nation to celebrate his life, the former Alaska governor chose to make a spectacle of herself on Facebook. This is the entirety of her post : “Happy MLK, Jr. Day! “'I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.' - Martin Luther King, Jr. “Mr.
SCIENCE
November 4, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Love may conquer all, but the process still seems to be cluttered with racial bias. A new study suggests the world of online dating appears to be just as segregated as the outside world, but those who use the sites appear willing to give interracial and interethnic dating a whirl if someone makes the first move, a new study finds. The results, published online Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, opens a crack in the façade of prejudice, albeit a small and temporary one: Users revert to their old preferences after a while, according to UC San Diego sociologist Kevin Lewis, author of the study.
NEWS
July 20, 2013 | By Paul Thornton
Reading the 250-plus reader letters so far on the George Zimmerman trial hasn't exactly been an uplifting experience. This isn't to say the letters lacked insight; on the contrary, most were earnest and well reasoned. The problem was the subject matter: Not even the most talented of writers could put a positive spin on the needless death of Trayvon Martin, the unarmed teenager who was shot and killed by Zimmerman last year in Florida following a brief altercation between the two. But even among this depressing lot was a subset of letters that especially stung.
OPINION
September 16, 2012 | By William McGowan
Myanmar's pro-democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi has extolled Buddhism for allowing her a sense of inner freedom during her 15 years of house arrest. She's also said that Buddhist precepts can guide her country's democratic transition, encouraging reconciliation with the military instead of anger and revenge. But the more nationalistic face of this Buddhist tradition, brought into focus by recent violence directed against Rohingya Muslims in the western state of Rakhine, could yet derail democratic reforms in Myanmar (also known as Burma)
OPINION
September 2, 2012
Re "Dems play the race card," Opinion, Aug. 28 I commend Jonah Goldberg for writing about race in the election. Taking into account American history, it's obvious that the race card has been in play since Day One. Consider the rise of the tea party and its reaction to Obamacare and nearly all of President Obama's other policy pursuits. The degree of outrage has always felt out of sync. By historical standards Obama's policies did little to upend the establishment. So why does the phrase "take back our country" resonate?
OPINION
September 2, 2012
Re "Fines would rise for phone misuse," Aug. 29 In addition to raising the fines for using cellphones while driving, it should be mandatory for all who are cited to see photos of actual accidents that were caused by drivers who were using cellphones. As a former casualty adjuster I can verify that seeing the results of distracted driving have the intended response. I never use a cellphone while driving. It's too scary to think I could be responsible for such loss. Susan Little Cerritos The Times' article on fines for cellphone violations was incomplete, since it failed to note that every fine in California is increased by mandatory assessments.
SCIENCE
November 4, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Love may conquer all, but the process still seems to be cluttered with racial bias. A new study suggests the world of online dating appears to be just as segregated as the outside world, but those who use the sites appear willing to give interracial and interethnic dating a whirl if someone makes the first move, a new study finds. The results, published online Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, opens a crack in the façade of prejudice, albeit a small and temporary one: Users revert to their old preferences after a while, according to UC San Diego sociologist Kevin Lewis, author of the study.
NEWS
October 30, 2007 | David A. Lehrer and Joe R. Hicks, David A. Lehrer is president and Joe R. Hicks is vice president of Community Advocates Inc. (cai-la.org), a human relations organization based in Los Angeles.
The Los Angeles City Claims Board awarded former Department of Transportation head Gloria Jeff $95,000 last week. That action has been appropriately lambasted in local editorials, which decried paying out a princely sum -- presumably to avoid a lawsuit -- to a city employee who served at the mayor's pleasure.
OPINION
August 28, 2012 | Jonah Goldberg
Huzzah, America, our centuries-old struggle with racism and bigotry may be coming to an end. This news was confirmed by none other than Michael Eric Dyson, a professor of sociology and the author of 18 books on race, racism, racial history, black culture and black history. Suffice it to say, he knows a lot about prejudice and bigotry. Yet in response to Mitt Romney's lame joke about not needing a birth certificate to prove he was from Michigan, Dyson proclaimed, to the approval of a collection of sage pundits on MSNBC, that Romney was resorting to "the basest and the most despicable bigotry we might be able to imagine.
NATIONAL
August 21, 2012 | By Mark Z. Barabak, Los Angeles Times
Fred Davis always loved putting on a show. As a boy, he recruited his siblings and neighbor kids to perform in the plays he wrote and staged in the family den and, sometimes, in nursing homes around Tulsa, Okla. Davis wanted to be an actor, but his middling talent and the sudden death of his father when he was a teenager changed those plans. He inherited his dad's public relations firm, grew up and became a successful commercial ad man before moving into politics, largely by happenstance.
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