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Race Card

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1999 | EARL OFARI HUTCHINSON, Earl Ofari Hutchinson is the author of "The Crisis in Black and Black" (Middle Passage Press, 1998). E-mail: ehutchi344@aol.com
There were three lessons learned from the city's primary election: Better times mean a pitiful voter turnout; the end is far from in sight for "identity politics," and big money can make a difference for a candidate. Politicians had their cake and ate it, too, with the happy-days-are-here-again theme. They wrung their hands and wailed about voter apathy, yet they endlessly chattered on about how L.A.
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OPINION
September 18, 2003 | Shelby Steele, Shelby Steele is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University.
The arguments against Proposition 54 -- the state initiative that would spare Californians the indignity of declaring their race on state forms and applications -- bring to mind the joke about the man driven to his roof by rising floodwaters. A rowboat comes to rescue him but he turns it down. "God will save me," he says. A helicopter and a speedboat come next but he turns them down as well. "God will save me," he keeps saying. Finally the waters overwhelm him and he drowns.
NEWS
January 7, 2000 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An angry Gen. Colin L. Powell cautioned Al Gore on Thursday against "playing the polarizing 'race card' " in the presidential campaign after the vice president's campaign manager said in a recent interview that the Republican Party would rather "take pictures with black children than feed them."
OPINION
October 8, 1995 | ROBERT SCHEER, Robert Scheer is a Times contributing editor. He can be reached via e-mail at <76327.1675@compuserve.com>
Enough already. How much longer must we indulge this cacophony of outrage complaining that O.J. Simpson got away with murder? Maybe he did and maybe he didn't; he wouldn't be the first. But under our system of law, Simpson must be presumed innocent since he was not proved guilty. It is highly irresponsible for the Los Angeles district attorney, the governor and many other "leaders" to wantonly besmirch this sacred principle of our legal system.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2004 | Shawn Hubler, Times Staff Writer
His black skin has become white and his nose has been thinned to near-disintegration. His male voice is soprano and his hair now cascades like a woman's over one eye. Michael Jackson, the black child prodigy whose musical genius made him for decades the world's biggest pop draw, has spent much of his adult life obliterating, to heartbreaking effect, the identity he was born with.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1996 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His voice shaking with anger, Republican congressional candidate K. Paul Jhin on Saturday accused rival Rich Sybert of "lying" and "playing the race card" in a campaign mailer that questions Jhin's name, his Republican credentials and whether his campaign has ties to foreign corporations. "I'm a Christian and I try to practice the golden rule," Jhin said. "But when I got this [mailer] I was shocked. It is irresponsible for somebody who wants to be a congressman to slander somebody's character."
NEWS
July 20, 2013 | By Paul Thornton
Reading the 250-plus reader letters so far on the George Zimmerman trial hasn't exactly been an uplifting experience. This isn't to say the letters lacked insight; on the contrary, most were earnest and well reasoned. The problem was the subject matter: Not even the most talented of writers could put a positive spin on the needless death of Trayvon Martin, the unarmed teenager who was shot and killed by Zimmerman last year in Florida following a brief altercation between the two. But even among this depressing lot was a subset of letters that especially stung.
OPINION
April 19, 2014
Re "Holder plays the race card," Opinion, April 15 According to Jonah Goldberg, Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. is guilty of playing the race card because he supposedly inferred that race was behind his ill treatment by a House committee. The divisiveness in Washington that Holder referred to has nothing to do with race. Goldberg then compliments former Atty. Gen. Alberto R. Gonzales for nobly declining to play the race card when he came under fire from Democrats. Gonzales had no cards to play at all, drawing fire from Republicans and Democrats alike for his ineptitude.
NATIONAL
August 21, 2012 | By Mark Z. Barabak, Los Angeles Times
Fred Davis always loved putting on a show. As a boy, he recruited his siblings and neighbor kids to perform in the plays he wrote and staged in the family den and, sometimes, in nursing homes around Tulsa, Okla. Davis wanted to be an actor, but his middling talent and the sudden death of his father when he was a teenager changed those plans. He inherited his dad's public relations firm, grew up and became a successful commercial ad man before moving into politics, largely by happenstance.
OPINION
March 19, 2008
It may have begun as an exercise in political damage control, but Barack Obama's speech in Philadelphia on "A More Perfect Union" was that rarity in American political discourse: a serious discussion of racial division, distrust and demonization. Whether or not the speech defuses the controversy about some crackpot comments by Obama's longtime pastor, it redefines our national conversation about race and politics and lays down a challenge to the cynical use of the "race card."
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