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NEWS
November 25, 1990 | Associated Press
An early morning fire Saturday turned commercial stables into a ruin, killing more than 50 show and race horses. Fire officials said the cause of the blaze was under investigation, and they had not ruled out arson.
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SPORTS
July 7, 2013 | Bill Dwyre
At least super horse Game On Dude gave a sad day at Betfair Hollywood Park a grand finale. At least when the bulldozers start doing their work in January, those in Saturday's crowd of 6,493 for the 74th — and last — Hollywood Gold Cup, will have their memories. And yes, if you know anything about horse racing in Southern California, you know that an attendance figure of 6,493 for a $500,000 Grade I race with the reputation and history of the Hollywood Gold Cup is a disgrace.
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SPORTS
October 4, 1994 | GERARD WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fourteen thoroughbreds were dead. And trainer Vic Rail, once famous for his association with a remarkable horse, lay critically ill in the intensive care section of a city hospital. No cause could be established for either. There was speculation that the afflictions could be related, except that medical experts--both human and equine--said it was impossible for a man to catch a disease from a horse.
SPORTS
March 1, 2013 | Staff and Wire reports
Joe Flacco and the Baltimore Ravens reached a tentative agreement Friday on a new contract that would make the Super Bowl most valuable plater the highest-paid player in NFL history. If the deal is finalized, the veteran quarterback would receive in excess of $120 million over six years, according to a person close to the negotiations who spoke on condition of anonymity because the contract has not yet been signed. Flacco would earn more than the $20-million average salary Drew Brees receives with the New Orleans Saints.
SPORTS
March 9, 1990
The U.S. attorney's office has dropped charges against a Kentucky dentist accused of scheming to kill race horses for insurance money, prosecutors confirmed. Dr. Joseph J. Brown of Shelbyville, Ky., was arrested Feb. 17 in a Florida thoroughbred barn on wire fraud charges. The case evolved after Brown allegedly told an undercover agent for the Thorougbred Racing Protective Board that he would kill race horses for a share of the insurance profits. It was dismissed March 1 by U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2012 | By Alan Zarembo, Los Angeles Times
Horses died while racing at Santa Anita Park at more than double the rate of horses at the state's other three major thoroughbred tracks over the last fiscal year, according to state statistics. The fatality rate at Santa Anita, in Arcadia, rose significantly after a return to a dirt running surface in 2010 after three years of using a synthetic track, the data show. Track surfaces are one of several factors that experts say play a role in horses' deaths — a longtime bane of the racing industry.
SPORTS
September 8, 2010 | Wire reports
Embattled Kansas Athletic Director Lew Perkins retired 12 months early Tuesday, following a year of controversy and embarrassment for both himself and the school. Perkins, 65, said in June that he would retire in September 2011. Instead, he and Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little announced he was leaving immediately and didn't make themselves available to reporters to explain why. Senior associate athletics director Sean Lester , who came in with Perkins in 2003, was named interim athletic director.
SPORTS
March 1, 2013 | By Eric Sondheimer
Under pressure from trainers and owners who support the use of the diuretic furosemide to prevent bleeding in race horses, the Breeders' Cup Board of Directors voted Friday to reverse a decision that would have banned the drug's use for all races at its world championships on Nov. 1-2 at Santa Anita. Instead, the Breeders' Cup will continue the medical policy it put in for this past year's world championships, banning furosemide, previously known as Lasix, for only the juvenile races.
SPORTS
December 6, 1989 | From Associated Press
Atty. Gen. Robert Spire said today that a seven-month investigation into Nebraska horse racing "does not disclose any criminal violations by state Racing Commission officials or employees." He said his office considers the case closed. Spire specifically said the investigation had uncovered no improper conduct by Harry F. Farnham, former commission chairman. He said the investigation by the Nebraska State Patrol "was careful, thorough and professional."
SPORTS
December 25, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Santa Anita, one of the nation's premier race tracks, opened for business 65 years ago today. But it almost didn't happen that way. Not at Santa Anita, anyway. The syndicate that built the facility first wanted to put it in San Francisco, but the neighborhoods near the proposed site raised an uproar. Next, Culver City was designated. That didn't work out either.
SPORTS
March 1, 2013 | By Eric Sondheimer
Under pressure from trainers and owners who support the use of the diuretic furosemide to prevent bleeding in race horses, the Breeders' Cup Board of Directors voted Friday to reverse a decision that would have banned the drug's use for all races at its world championships on Nov. 1-2 at Santa Anita. Instead, the Breeders' Cup will continue the medical policy it put in for this past year's world championships, banning furosemide, previously known as Lasix, for only the juvenile races.
SPORTS
February 25, 2013
In the aftermath of Saturday's crash at Daytona International Raceway, writers from around the Tribune Co. discuss whether NASCAR should reconsider restrictor-plate racing for safety reasons. Feel free to join the conversation with a comment of your own. Jim Peltz, Los Angeles Times After finishing third in the Daytona 500, Mark Martin addressed the NASCAR Nationwide Series crash a day earlier that injured spectators when they were hit by flying debris. That outcome, he said, "is something that we cannot have happen.
SPORTS
July 17, 2012 | By Lance Pugmire
Del Mar is celebrating its 75th anniversary of horse racing by increasing purses in 10 stakes races, a move aimed at keeping California horses at home so they can race on the seaside venue's synthetic surface. The season opens Wednesday, highlighted by the two-division $100,000 Oceanside Stakes for 3-year-olds on turf. Wednesday-through-Sunday racing continues through Sept. 5, including a Labor Day card. Majestic City, winner of last year's Hollywood Juvenile Championship, is scheduled to race in the second division of the Oceanside Stakes.
SPORTS
June 8, 2012 | By Andrew John
I'll Have Another was added to a short list and a long list Friday by bowing out of the Belmont Stakes because of a leg injury. The Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes winner is just the third horse to win the first two legs of horse racing's Triple Crown to not race in the third. But he's just the latest of many horses to have tendinitis end their career. After I'll Have Another took a routine gallop over the Elmont, N.Y., track Thursday afternoon, trainer Doug O'Neill noticed a "loss of definition" in the thoroughbred's left leg. After an easy gallop early Friday morning, additional swelling was visible after a cooling-down period.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2012 | By Alan Zarembo, Los Angeles Times
Horses died while racing at Santa Anita Park at more than double the rate of horses at the state's other three major thoroughbred tracks over the last fiscal year, according to state statistics. The fatality rate at Santa Anita, in Arcadia, rose significantly after a return to a dirt running surface in 2010 after three years of using a synthetic track, the data show. Track surfaces are one of several factors that experts say play a role in horses' deaths — a longtime bane of the racing industry.
SPORTS
June 11, 2011 | By Kevin Van Valkenburg
Reporting from Elmont, N.Y. A wild and unpredictable Triple Crown season came to an appropriately stunning conclusion Saturday as 24-1 longshot Ruler On Ice won the 143rd running of the Belmont Stakes. Ruler On Ice, a gelding who didn't run in either the Kentucky Derby or the Preakness and was wearing blinkers for the first time, sat just off the lead for most of the race, and then jockey Jose Valdivia Jr. let him surge to the lead with a quarter of a mile to go. The temperamental but talented colt ran hard to the wire, holding off Stay Thirsty (second)
SPORTS
March 3, 1989 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
A report by an independent New Mexico laboratory indicates that as many as 60 horses that ran at Santa Anita last year had suspicious postrace urine samples. International Diagnostics Systems of Las Cruces, N.M., which analyzed almost 500 urine samples from the 27-day Oak Tree meeting at Santa Anita last fall, found that the horses had possibly run with a variety of illegal drugs, including cocaine. The laboratory identified 16 chemical products that are banned by state racing officials.
SPORTS
February 21, 1993 | PAUL MORAN, NEWSDAY
Dear Hillary and President Clinton, New York Gov. Mario Cuomo, Secretary of Commerce Ron Brown, and Rush Limbaugh: Did I forget anyone? Oh. Dear members of the Senate and the House of Representatives: These are difficult times in the racing business. Lately, your mail may have brought this to your attention. If it has, you must first realize how unusual it is for people immersed in racing to put pen to paper and write to a politician.
SPORTS
November 29, 2010 | Bill Dwyre
In horse racing terms, Grant and Greta Hays have had a rough trip. They have two young children, both severely autistic. "After we had Jack, we wanted to have another child," Grant Hays says. "We thought the odds of having a second with autism were really low. " Jack is 6, Dylan 2. Neither speaks, except on rare spontaneous occasions. According to their father, they are antisocial kids, which is not unusual with autistic children. Grant says it creates a life of stress and tension, and cites research that says something like 85% of parents with autistic children get divorced.
SPORTS
September 8, 2010 | Wire reports
Embattled Kansas Athletic Director Lew Perkins retired 12 months early Tuesday, following a year of controversy and embarrassment for both himself and the school. Perkins, 65, said in June that he would retire in September 2011. Instead, he and Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little announced he was leaving immediately and didn't make themselves available to reporters to explain why. Senior associate athletics director Sean Lester , who came in with Perkins in 2003, was named interim athletic director.
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