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Race Relations United States

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1996 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Bill Bradley (D-New Jersey), one of the few white politicians who regularly speaks out on race relations, spent 40 minutes Thursday lecturing a group of business leaders about the need for blacks and whites to get along better in order for America to successfully face its multiracial future.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1996 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Bill Bradley (D-New Jersey), one of the few white politicians who regularly speaks out on race relations, spent 40 minutes Thursday lecturing a group of business leaders about the need for blacks and whites to get along better in order for America to successfully face its multiracial future.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1991 | NINA J. EASTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the movie "Not Without My Daughter," Sally Field's character is brutally beaten by her Iranian husband, who refuses to let her--or their young daughter--leave Iran. Another American woman is subjected to the same violent treatment by her Iranian husband. No one among their Islamic families and friends intervenes to protect the women.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1991 | NINA J. EASTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the movie "Not Without My Daughter," Sally Field's character is brutally beaten by her Iranian husband, who refuses to let her--or their young daughter--leave Iran. Another American woman is subjected to the same violent treatment by her Iranian husband. No one among their Islamic families and friends intervenes to protect the women.
NEWS
February 24, 1991 | MALCOLM FRIED, UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL
Gerrit le Grange, retired race classification expert, still owns what he once fondly called "my people-tester"--a pencil that helped him determine race in otherwise tricky circumstances. Le Grange would poke the pencil into a subject's hair. If it dropped out, the person was considered white. If it stuck tight, the individual was assumed to be black. In the newly reforming South Africa, Le Grange's expertise is no longer needed.
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