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Race Relations United States

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NEWS
August 6, 1997 | KEN RINGLE, WASHINGTON POST
When the tall ships became the stars of America's Bicentennial, every city on the East Coast wanted them to visit. Every city, that is, except the nation's capital--the one place all the ships wanted to go. Like most African Americans, many officials of the D.C. government "hear 'sailing ships' and think 'slave ships' and 'middle passage,' " said a frustrated official of Operation Sail after the rebuff in Washington. "They have no concept of any black maritime tradition outside of that.
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NEWS
July 24, 1998 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"It is hereby declared to be the policy of the president that there shall be equality of treatment and opportunity for all persons in the armed services without regard to race, color, religion or national origin. This policy shall be put into effect as rapidly as possible, having due regard to the time required to effectuate any necessary changes without impairing efficiency or morale." --President Harry S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1996 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Bill Bradley (D-New Jersey), one of the few white politicians who regularly speaks out on race relations, spent 40 minutes Thursday lecturing a group of business leaders about the need for blacks and whites to get along better in order for America to successfully face its multiracial future.
NEWS
August 6, 1997 | KEN RINGLE, WASHINGTON POST
When the tall ships became the stars of America's Bicentennial, every city on the East Coast wanted them to visit. Every city, that is, except the nation's capital--the one place all the ships wanted to go. Like most African Americans, many officials of the D.C. government "hear 'sailing ships' and think 'slave ships' and 'middle passage,' " said a frustrated official of Operation Sail after the rebuff in Washington. "They have no concept of any black maritime tradition outside of that.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1991 | NINA J. EASTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the movie "Not Without My Daughter," Sally Field's character is brutally beaten by her Iranian husband, who refuses to let her--or their young daughter--leave Iran. Another American woman is subjected to the same violent treatment by her Iranian husband. No one among their Islamic families and friends intervenes to protect the women.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1993 | TOM JACOBS, Tom Jacobs is a regular contributor to The Times.
Ron Link calls it "the aunts and mommies kind of bigotry." "It starts very early," the director noted. "It's the mother with baking soda on her hands giving you a cookie and telling you not to play with 'those colored kids.' You get it handed off to you from the aunts you love and the grandmother you love. Later in life, you can't believe that these people you grew up in love with could be like that." Del Shores knows that kind of racism well.
NEWS
July 24, 1998 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"It is hereby declared to be the policy of the president that there shall be equality of treatment and opportunity for all persons in the armed services without regard to race, color, religion or national origin. This policy shall be put into effect as rapidly as possible, having due regard to the time required to effectuate any necessary changes without impairing efficiency or morale." --President Harry S.
NEWS
October 13, 1995
Coretta Scott King said Thursday night that she doubts the O.J. Simpson verdict will have a long-term adverse effect on U.S. race relations. Speaking to an audience of about 300 at Soka University in Calabasas, the widow of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. said, "I strongly believe that this verdict should have no effect whatsoever on the racial attitudes of people of good will, regardless of their race.
NEWS
February 24, 1991 | MALCOLM FRIED, UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL
Gerrit le Grange, retired race classification expert, still owns what he once fondly called "my people-tester"--a pencil that helped him determine race in otherwise tricky circumstances. Le Grange would poke the pencil into a subject's hair. If it dropped out, the person was considered white. If it stuck tight, the individual was assumed to be black. In the newly reforming South Africa, Le Grange's expertise is no longer needed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1996 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Bill Bradley (D-New Jersey), one of the few white politicians who regularly speaks out on race relations, spent 40 minutes Thursday lecturing a group of business leaders about the need for blacks and whites to get along better in order for America to successfully face its multiracial future.
NEWS
October 13, 1995
Coretta Scott King said Thursday night that she doubts the O.J. Simpson verdict will have a long-term adverse effect on U.S. race relations. Speaking to an audience of about 300 at Soka University in Calabasas, the widow of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. said, "I strongly believe that this verdict should have no effect whatsoever on the racial attitudes of people of good will, regardless of their race.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1993 | TOM JACOBS, Tom Jacobs is a regular contributor to The Times.
Ron Link calls it "the aunts and mommies kind of bigotry." "It starts very early," the director noted. "It's the mother with baking soda on her hands giving you a cookie and telling you not to play with 'those colored kids.' You get it handed off to you from the aunts you love and the grandmother you love. Later in life, you can't believe that these people you grew up in love with could be like that." Del Shores knows that kind of racism well.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1991 | NINA J. EASTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the movie "Not Without My Daughter," Sally Field's character is brutally beaten by her Iranian husband, who refuses to let her--or their young daughter--leave Iran. Another American woman is subjected to the same violent treatment by her Iranian husband. No one among their Islamic families and friends intervenes to protect the women.
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