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Rachel Carson

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OPINION
February 23, 2014 | By Gary Paul Nabhan
" But most of all I shall remember the monarchs, that unhurried westward drift of one small winged form after another, each drawn by some invisible force. " - Rachel Carson, in a letter to Dorothy Freeman, Sept. 10, 1963 . After news broke recently that the number of migratory monarch butterflies that had arrived to winter in Mexico was the lowest since reliable records began, I went on the road on behalf of the Make Way for Monarchs initiative. This solutions-oriented collaboration is working to place millions of additional milkweeds in toxin-free habitats this next year.
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OPINION
February 23, 2014 | By Gary Paul Nabhan
" But most of all I shall remember the monarchs, that unhurried westward drift of one small winged form after another, each drawn by some invisible force. " - Rachel Carson, in a letter to Dorothy Freeman, Sept. 10, 1963 . After news broke recently that the number of migratory monarch butterflies that had arrived to winter in Mexico was the lowest since reliable records began, I went on the road on behalf of the Make Way for Monarchs initiative. This solutions-oriented collaboration is working to place millions of additional milkweeds in toxin-free habitats this next year.
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BOOKS
September 21, 1997 | DAVID RAINS WALLACE, David Rains Wallace is the author of numerous books on natural history and conservation, including the forthcoming "The Monkey's Bridge: Evolutionary Mysteries of Central America" (Sierra Club). He is a winner of the John Burroughs Medal for Nature Writing
Since her death in 1964, Rachel Carson has become environmentalism's patron saint. Although her books are no longer at the cutting edge of science and conservation, her life has become the ethical and practical model for environmentalists. Every environmental writer dreams of producing a book like "Silent Spring," and every activist dreams of changing societal attitudes toward nature as Carson did. Yet surprisingly little has been written about Carson since her death.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2013 | By Alice Short
When you write a book that is titled "Breasts: A Natural and Unnatural History," you probably expect a question something like this: What on Earth was the impetus for the work ... and the title? Florence Williams, the winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for science and technology, proved to be ready for the query. During a video chat at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books on Saturday, she explained that she had been nursing her second child and wondered about toxins in her breast milk.
BOOKS
April 16, 1995 | Linda Leer, Linda Lear is the author of "Rachel Carson: Witness for Nature" to be published by Henry Holt and Company Inc. She is a research collaborator at the Office of the Smithsonian Institution Archives
Rachel Carson was already an icon before she died in April 1964 at age 56. The best-selling author of three books on the natural history of the sea, hers was a trusted voice. Calm and imperturbable in the face of spurious attack by the chemical industry, she never wavered from her conclusions of corporate misuse, regulatory negligence and public betrayal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2010 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
Al Gore has had some tough breaks — like losing the presidency after getting more votes than the other guy — but the noted environmentalist achieved a singular honor last week, becoming the first vice president to have a Los Angeles school named after him. And, fittingly, the school will be devoted to environmental themes. But as in the 2000 election, there's a catch. Critics say the campus' location poses a long-term health risk to students and staff. School district officials insist that the Arlington Heights property is clean and safe.
BOOKS
February 25, 2007 | Susan Salter Reynolds, susan.reynolds@latimes.com Susan Salter Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
WHO is the next Rachel Carson? It's a question you hear a lot in environmental circles. Where is the writer who can bridge the gap between poetry and science? Where is the book whose message is so accessible, so imperative, that it inspires not only activism but legislation? Her fourth book, "Silent Spring," on the effects of DDT exposure on plants, animals and humans, was published in 1962.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2013 | By Alice Short
When you write a book that is titled "Breasts: A Natural and Unnatural History," you probably expect a question something like this: What on Earth was the impetus for the work ... and the title? Florence Williams, the winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for science and technology, proved to be ready for the query. During a video chat at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books on Saturday, she explained that she had been nursing her second child and wondered about toxins in her breast milk.
OPINION
July 16, 2010 | By Fred A. Bernstein
Seeing a statue of Rachel Carson, the crusading American environmentalist, at the World Expo in Shanghai moved me almost to tears. After all, Carson is a symbol of independent thought and action, both vital U.S. exports. Too bad the statue wasn't at the U.S. pavilion. But that building, sponsored in part by Carson's nemesis, Dow Chemical, was never going to be a celebration of the power of individuals. Indeed, the pavilion, with its bland tribute to "community," says little about what makes America, and Americans, special.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2011 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The View from Lazy Point A Natural Year in an Unnatural World Carl Safina Henry Holt: 416 pp., $30 "The View from Lazy Point" is a naturalist's notebook, a record of a year at Carl Safina's home on the Sound side of eastern Long Island, north of Amagansett and south of Montauk. Safina, a marine ecologist and environmental activist, has often been compared with Rachel Carson ? an "ecologist with the soul of a poet," wrote Richard Ellis in these pages. He has written five books and won many awards for his work and his writing, including Pew, MacArthur and Guggenheim fellowships.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2011 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The View from Lazy Point A Natural Year in an Unnatural World Carl Safina Henry Holt: 416 pp., $30 "The View from Lazy Point" is a naturalist's notebook, a record of a year at Carl Safina's home on the Sound side of eastern Long Island, north of Amagansett and south of Montauk. Safina, a marine ecologist and environmental activist, has often been compared with Rachel Carson ? an "ecologist with the soul of a poet," wrote Richard Ellis in these pages. He has written five books and won many awards for his work and his writing, including Pew, MacArthur and Guggenheim fellowships.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2010 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
Al Gore has had some tough breaks — like losing the presidency after getting more votes than the other guy — but the noted environmentalist achieved a singular honor last week, becoming the first vice president to have a Los Angeles school named after him. And, fittingly, the school will be devoted to environmental themes. But as in the 2000 election, there's a catch. Critics say the campus' location poses a long-term health risk to students and staff. School district officials insist that the Arlington Heights property is clean and safe.
OPINION
July 16, 2010 | By Fred A. Bernstein
Seeing a statue of Rachel Carson, the crusading American environmentalist, at the World Expo in Shanghai moved me almost to tears. After all, Carson is a symbol of independent thought and action, both vital U.S. exports. Too bad the statue wasn't at the U.S. pavilion. But that building, sponsored in part by Carson's nemesis, Dow Chemical, was never going to be a celebration of the power of individuals. Indeed, the pavilion, with its bland tribute to "community," says little about what makes America, and Americans, special.
BOOKS
February 25, 2007 | Susan Salter Reynolds, susan.reynolds@latimes.com Susan Salter Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
WHO is the next Rachel Carson? It's a question you hear a lot in environmental circles. Where is the writer who can bridge the gap between poetry and science? Where is the book whose message is so accessible, so imperative, that it inspires not only activism but legislation? Her fourth book, "Silent Spring," on the effects of DDT exposure on plants, animals and humans, was published in 1962.
BOOKS
September 21, 1997 | DAVID RAINS WALLACE, David Rains Wallace is the author of numerous books on natural history and conservation, including the forthcoming "The Monkey's Bridge: Evolutionary Mysteries of Central America" (Sierra Club). He is a winner of the John Burroughs Medal for Nature Writing
Since her death in 1964, Rachel Carson has become environmentalism's patron saint. Although her books are no longer at the cutting edge of science and conservation, her life has become the ethical and practical model for environmentalists. Every environmental writer dreams of producing a book like "Silent Spring," and every activist dreams of changing societal attitudes toward nature as Carson did. Yet surprisingly little has been written about Carson since her death.
BOOKS
April 16, 1995 | Linda Leer, Linda Lear is the author of "Rachel Carson: Witness for Nature" to be published by Henry Holt and Company Inc. She is a research collaborator at the Office of the Smithsonian Institution Archives
Rachel Carson was already an icon before she died in April 1964 at age 56. The best-selling author of three books on the natural history of the sea, hers was a trusted voice. Calm and imperturbable in the face of spurious attack by the chemical industry, she never wavered from her conclusions of corporate misuse, regulatory negligence and public betrayal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1990 | HERBERT J. VIDA
Irvine resident Suzanne Baker, a junior at Cal State Fullerton, was named the first recipient of the Rachel Carson Scholarship Award in Conservation Biology. Carson, the author of "Silent Spring," was one of the first to bring attention to the effects on the environment of the use of DDT, a toxic pesticide. Baker, a naturalist who cares for animals at the Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary in Modjeska Canyon, also acquaints the public with the canyon's wild habitats. Gail I.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1990
No need to worry about the "Silent Spring" which Rachel Carson wrote about so movingly. Even if the birds and bees have been poisoned by the pesticide purveyors, we still have the soothing drone from the helicopters. S. SCOVILLE Culver City
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1990 | HERBERT J. VIDA
Irvine resident Suzanne Baker, a junior at Cal State Fullerton, was named the first recipient of the Rachel Carson Scholarship Award in Conservation Biology. Carson, the author of "Silent Spring," was one of the first to bring attention to the effects on the environment of the use of DDT, a toxic pesticide. Baker, a naturalist who cares for animals at the Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary in Modjeska Canyon, also acquaints the public with the canyon's wild habitats. Gail I.
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