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Rachel Corrie

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OPINION
August 30, 2012
Re "Judge rules for Israel in U.S. activist's death," Aug. 29 Rachel Corrie's death in Gaza beneath an Israeli bulldozer was indeed tragic, but we shouldn't blame the victim. Or the bulldozer operator. Or the Israeli judicial system. The real culprit in this tragedy is the International Solidarity Movement (ISM), a pro-Palestinian group that sends young activists into a dangerous military zone to place their bodies in front of condemned Palestinian homes. The rationale is the belief that somehow a Westerner's life is more valuable than an Arab's.
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OPINION
August 30, 2012
Re "Judge rules for Israel in U.S. activist's death," Aug. 29 Rachel Corrie's death in Gaza beneath an Israeli bulldozer was indeed tragic, but we shouldn't blame the victim. Or the bulldozer operator. Or the Israeli judicial system. The real culprit in this tragedy is the International Solidarity Movement (ISM), a pro-Palestinian group that sends young activists into a dangerous military zone to place their bodies in front of condemned Palestinian homes. The rationale is the belief that somehow a Westerner's life is more valuable than an Arab's.
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WORLD
August 28, 2012 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
JERUSALEM - Nine years after their daughter was crushed by an Israeli military bulldozer in the Gaza Strip, the parents of American activist Rachel Corrie lost their legal bid Tuesday to hold Israel responsible for her death and force authorities to reopen the investigation. A Haifa judge rejected the parent's negligence lawsuit, calling Corrie's death an accident that she brought upon herself by refusing to leave what had been declared a closed military zone. "It was a very regrettable accident and not a deliberate act," said Judge Oded Gershon.
WORLD
August 28, 2012 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
JERUSALEM - Nine years after their daughter was crushed by an Israeli military bulldozer in the Gaza Strip, the parents of American activist Rachel Corrie lost their legal bid Tuesday to hold Israel responsible for her death and force authorities to reopen the investigation. A Haifa judge rejected the parent's negligence lawsuit, calling Corrie's death an accident that she brought upon herself by refusing to leave what had been declared a closed military zone. "It was a very regrettable accident and not a deliberate act," said Judge Oded Gershon.
WORLD
March 30, 2010 | By Edmund Sanders
The American parents sit stoically in a sky-lit courtroom, listening to testimony about how an Israeli military bulldozer crushed their daughter to death seven years ago. They hear about the dangerous game of chicken played for several hours that winter afternoon in 2003, between bulldozers and international activists trying to protect Palestinian homes, before Rachel Corrie disappeared under a creeping mound of dirt. Now her parents, calling an Israeli investigation that found no fault a "whitewash" and suspecting that the bulldozer driver deliberately ran over their daughter, are pursuing a civil lawsuit against the government.
WORLD
October 21, 2010 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
The bulldozer driver who crushed to death American activist Rachel Corrie seven years ago struggled Thursday just to recall her name. "It's Rachel-something," he testified in a Haifa courtroom. "Carrie?" The former Israeli reservist's courtroom appearance, his first public comments since the college student's 2003 death, was expected to be the dramatic climax of the Corrie family's long-running civil lawsuit against the Israeli government. But during more than four hours of testimony, the 38-year-old Russian immigrant, speaking from behind a screen to hide his identity, said he remembered little about that day and the young woman he ran over.
WORLD
June 5, 2010 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Israeli warships Saturday intercepted another aid supply ship sailed by pro-Palestinian activists as it headed toward the Gaza Strip in an attempt to break Israel's naval blockade of the seaside territory. Unlike a previous raid, Saturday's takeover occurred without bloodshed after Israeli naval negotiators reached an agreement to board the cargo vessel with activists' permission, according to Israeli military officials. The report could not be confirmed with activists because Israeli military jammed satellite and radio communications on the boat.
WORLD
June 5, 2010 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
Israeli warships early Saturday intercepted another aid supply ship sailed by pro-Palestinian activists as it headed toward the Gaza Strip in an attempt to break Israel's naval blockade of the seaside territory. Shortly after dawn, Israeli naval vessels began shadowing the cargo vessel — named Rachel Corrie after the pro-Palestinian activist from the U.S. who was killed in Gaza in 2003 — and jammed satellite communications, activists said. "We are not afraid," said Nobel Peace Prize laureate Mairead Corrigan Maguire, who is aboard the ship, in a telephone interview with Al Jazeera television shortly before the interception.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2005 | David Gritten, Special to The Times
She is a relatively obscure name in her native U.S. -- but thanks to a sellout play here, Rachel Corrie, crushed to death by an Israeli army bulldozer in March 2003, has become an unlikely icon among young British theatergoers. The 23-year-old student from Olympia, Wash., died in the village of Rafah on the Gaza Strip, where she lived among Palestinian families and worked for the Palestinian-led International Solidarity Movement, a nonviolent resistance group.
WORLD
March 16, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The family of Rachel Corrie, an American killed in the Gaza Strip while trying to stop an Israeli army bulldozer from destroying a Palestinian home, has sued Israel's government for $324,000, the Haaretz newspaper reported. Corrie, 23, a member of the pro-Palestinian International Solidarity Movement, was killed in March 2003. The army said the bulldozer driver never saw her, but Corrie's family says she was wearing bright clothing and had identified herself as a foreign activist.
WORLD
October 21, 2010 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
The bulldozer driver who crushed to death American activist Rachel Corrie seven years ago struggled Thursday just to recall her name. "It's Rachel-something," he testified in a Haifa courtroom. "Carrie?" The former Israeli reservist's courtroom appearance, his first public comments since the college student's 2003 death, was expected to be the dramatic climax of the Corrie family's long-running civil lawsuit against the Israeli government. But during more than four hours of testimony, the 38-year-old Russian immigrant, speaking from behind a screen to hide his identity, said he remembered little about that day and the young woman he ran over.
WORLD
June 6, 2010 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
Learning hard lessons from Monday's deadly raid of a pro-Palestinian aid flotilla, Israel's navy Saturday seized without incident a second protest vessel trying to reach the shores of the Gaza Strip. But even as Israel succeeded in preventing the boats from reaching their destination, it was struggling in the larger battle of defending its controversial blockade of Gaza to the outside world. Israel's handling of the high-seas interception Monday that left nine activists dead continued to reverberate.
WORLD
June 5, 2010 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Israeli warships Saturday intercepted another aid supply ship sailed by pro-Palestinian activists as it headed toward the Gaza Strip in an attempt to break Israel's naval blockade of the seaside territory. Unlike a previous raid, Saturday's takeover occurred without bloodshed after Israeli naval negotiators reached an agreement to board the cargo vessel with activists' permission, according to Israeli military officials. The report could not be confirmed with activists because Israeli military jammed satellite and radio communications on the boat.
WORLD
March 30, 2010 | By Edmund Sanders
The American parents sit stoically in a sky-lit courtroom, listening to testimony about how an Israeli military bulldozer crushed their daughter to death seven years ago. They hear about the dangerous game of chicken played for several hours that winter afternoon in 2003, between bulldozers and international activists trying to protect Palestinian homes, before Rachel Corrie disappeared under a creeping mound of dirt. Now her parents, calling an Israeli investigation that found no fault a "whitewash" and suspecting that the bulldozer driver deliberately ran over their daughter, are pursuing a civil lawsuit against the government.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2006
TO the Beverly Hills resident who complained about the defense of a non-"balanced" play, I say: If you don't want to watch a play that offends you, you can always watch "The Phantom of the Opera" (though that play improperly slanders people with facial deformities, so maybe not) [Letters, April 30]. Since political works of art have the intent of swaying popular opinion, the only political works of art that are worth a damn have clear biases. (Remember Steven Spielberg's mainstream "Munich" received much grief because it was a commentary on the destructive power of murder without distinguishing between those committed by the Palestinians and those committed by the Israelis.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2006 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
VANESSA REDGRAVE describes it as the "blacklisting of a dead girl and her diaries." Harold Pinter says it's nothing less than the "suppression of dissent and truth." And Tony Kushner professes to be "baffled" by the attempts to justify what has been seen as egregious self-censorship.
OPINION
March 26, 2005
Re "Activist's Parents Sue Caterpillar Inc.," March 20: I hope Rachel Corrie's parents are suing the Israeli government and its claques for slander also. It was only after this courageous young woman was crushed and killed by the bulldozer that they began implying she abetted terrorism. Nothing could be further from the truth. The Israelis have created in the occupied territories a system of military rule in which human rights violations, murder and torture of the Palestinian population goes unpunished.
OPINION
March 5, 2006
I am bewildered by Katharine Viner's "A message crushed again" (Opinion, March 1). New York Theatre Workshop has never shied away from controversial work. We moved toward a production of "My Name is Rachel Corrie" with short notice and almost no preparation time, the schedule largely driven by director Alan Rickman's film schedule. We were also in discussions with the Royal Court about helping mount an American tour following the New York engagement. When we discovered how deeply ingrained the attitudes were on all sides and what a marketing and contextualizing challenge this posed, we became convinced we didn't have enough time to best serve the powerful voice of Rachel Corrie.
NEWS
March 9, 2006 | Christopher Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
IT'S been three years since American college student and pro-Palestinian protester Rachel Corrie was killed beneath an Israeli army bulldozer, but her e-mails home are still starting arguments -- in London, where her writings have been transformed into a hit play; in New York, where a bid to stage that play has stalled amid controversy; and in Corrie's native Pacific Northwest, where activists plan demonstrations, and another play, in coming days.
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