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Rachel Hauck

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1995 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
"Comings and Goings," an evening of Beckett one-acts at the Actors' Gang, is occasionally very, very good--and occasionally, shall we say, interpretively challenged. "Play," the evening's opener, is also its set piece. The actors, Stephanie Erb, Bjorn Johnson and Nancy Hower, appear as disembodied heads in stone urns engaging in choppy chatter about their dismal love triangle. Under the keenly timed direction of Tracy Young, the actors never miss a beat of Beckett's propulsive exercise.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2004 | F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times
"Center of the Star" is the latest production in Cornerstone Theater Company's Faith-Based Theater Cycle, an ambitious four-year series examining how faith unites and divides the larger community. Presented in association with the Greenway Arts Alliance at the Greenway Court Theatre, "Star" amusingly encapsulates the history of Jews in Southern California.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2001 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Be Aggressive" is more than just an appeal to the young athletes at Vista del Sol High School. It also appears to be the motto of Annie Weisman, the young writer whose "Be Aggressive" is at La Jolla Playhouse. Weisman is no wallflower. As "Be Aggressive" begins, a car plows into a pedestrian--and we plunge into the play's central conflict: How does a Vista del Sol cheerleader cope with one of the least cheerful events imaginable--the sudden death of her mother?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2002 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Among the classic plays that are inappropriate for Mother's Day, "The House of Bernarda Alba" is almost up there with "Medea." The tyrannical titular character of Federico Garcia Lorca's drama doesn't murder her children, but she tries hard to prevent them from fully experiencing the variety of life. After her husband dies, she decrees that her five adult female offspring will do nothing but mourn for eight years--prisoners in their own home, with marriage as the only possible escape route.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2004 | Daryl H. Miller, Times Staff Writer
It's a time of change, yet she can't seem to rouse herself from stasis. On campuses and in the streets of 1968 San Francisco, people are challenging old ways of doing things. Beautiful, volatile Eiko, however, has just married the safest guy around and, though just back from her honeymoon, is already miserable. "You're bored, aren't you?" a gentleman friend of the family asks through a creepy, Cheshire Cat-like grin. Yes, but the conflict goes much deeper.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1999 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Ellen McLaughlin's wondrous new "Tongue of a Bird," at the Mark Taper Forum, is a rare bird: an adventure story that intrigues on both exterior and interior levels, spoken in a stage-worthy language that's richly lyrical yet remarkably accessible. McLaughlin sketches sharp portraits of several particular women, providing vivid roles for five actresses led by the redoubtable Cherry Jones, with nary a man in sight.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1999 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
America can't help itself. It's a selfish lover, especially attractive to those new to its embrace. It offers up fake images of its real self, courtesy of the movies, saying: Come and get it. Then a few years go by, dissatisfactions roil, and we realize what the movies meant all along: Just kidding. That's the view of playwright Chay Yew. It's a good start for a drama about otherness in America. Yet this one's oddly frustrating.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2004 | Daryl H. Miller, Times Staff Writer
The laughter, at first, was fitful and uncertain, the reaction of an opening-weekend audience wondering: What in the world have I gotten myself into this time? No doubt that question will hang in the air at every performance of "Mr. Marmalade" at South Coast Repertory. But once an audience gives itself permission to chortle at the strange yet queasily familiar events taking place onstage, it enters into a sort of group therapy, which can prove cathartic.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
The true Puritan, said essayist and cultural critic Randolph Bourne (1886-1918), "loves virtue not so much for its own sake as for its being an instrument of terror." Bourne was no Puritan, though a lesser spirit in his circumstances might have become one. The writer endured what was termed a "messy" birth and grew up stunted, disfigured, often mercilessly taunted.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2003 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
The title "The Country" means the countryside, not a particular country. Playwright Martin Crimp apparently intended to contrast the city and the country, as so many of his fellow British writers before him have done. His characters are city dwellers who move to the country but ultimately fail to enjoy its storied bucolic bliss -- although it eventually becomes clear that their problems date back to their urban days.
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