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Rachel Lachowicz

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December 16, 1990 | SHAUNA SNOW
FACES "I'm done trying to convince people of something," says artist Rachel Lachowicz, whose new work is on view at Santa Monica's Krygier/Landau Contemporary Art through Jan. 15. "Things aren't really going to change that much in my lifetime, so now I'm just looking at life rather than trying to change it." The object of Lachowicz's ire is the male classification of women, which she believes leads to the "ridiculous role playing" that comes with putting on makeup.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2013 | By Sharon Mizota
In her latest exhibition at Shoshana Wayne Gallery, Rachel Lachowicz continues her exploration of gender roles in an unusual medium: makeup. That choice is an unavoidable statement about gender, like Janine Antoni painting the floor with her hair dipped in Clairol, or the fact that knitting and embroidery - now ubiquitous in museums and galleries - still carry connotations of “women's work.” Lachowicz's challenge is to do something interesting...
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1992
"Will you still love me when I'm 88?" Face to face with Rachel Lachowicz's three mask-like versions of herself--at 28 (her current age), 58 and 88--a viewer muses on the changing way the world views a woman as she ages, and on the mythology of makeup in our culture. Somewhat unnervingly, these plaster faces--metamorphosing from taut-skinned expressionlessness to a lined and pouchy scowl--all are covered with the same tint, from the Chanel "poudre douce" line.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1992 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Will you still love me when I'm 88?" Face to face with Rachel Lachowicz's three mask-like versions of herself--at 28 (her current age), 58 and 88--a viewer muses on the changing way the world sees a woman as she ages, and on the mythology of makeup in our culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1992 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Talk about role reversal. For her first performance-art piece, Rachel Lachowicz dolled up two nude male models with cherry-red lipstick. She didn't apply it to their lips, however; she smeared it on their chests, buttocks, thighs and penises, then had them lie face-down on pristine white canvases, creating artworks from their body prints. "It was a little outrageous (but) lots of fun," said Lachowicz.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1992 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Will you still love me when I'm 88?" Face to face with Rachel Lachowicz's three mask-like versions of herself--at 28 (her current age), 58 and 88--a viewer muses on the changing way the world sees a woman as she ages, and on the mythology of makeup in our culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1989 | SUVAN GEER
Witty and perverse, Rachel Lachowicz transforms things into suggestive other things. She can turn a piece of T-shaped metal into a plunger for a nonexistent explosive charge. She can mount a graphite log on a wooden cart making a crude pencil caddy for giants on the run. Hers is a surreal vocabulary of odd anecdotes for things transformed by use. A library card catalogue becomes a process piece on traceability, leaking trails of fine sand when opened and closed.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2013 | By Sharon Mizota
In her latest exhibition at Shoshana Wayne Gallery, Rachel Lachowicz continues her exploration of gender roles in an unusual medium: makeup. That choice is an unavoidable statement about gender, like Janine Antoni painting the floor with her hair dipped in Clairol, or the fact that knitting and embroidery - now ubiquitous in museums and galleries - still carry connotations of “women's work.” Lachowicz's challenge is to do something interesting...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1998
Recycled Treasures: Forgettable objects become poetic monuments to the everyday in Tony Feher's unassuming mixed-media sculptures at Richard Telles Fine Art. A few glass bottles, marbles and Styrofoam bricks rescued from the trash heap are all that Feher needs to evoke the internal rhythm of prosaic activities, while simultaneously investing his Minimalist vocabulary with contemporary relevance.
NEWS
September 15, 1994 | ROSE APODACA JONES
A mask can reveal as much as it can conceal. It can serve as a window on our fantasies and dreams. We can be a star, mutant, bandit or super hero. A mask allows us to face up to our secret monsters and play the demon for fun. Masks--much like fashion--let us express who we are. The Newport Harbor Art Museum is hoping that art lovers will reach for a mask and reveal their support in coming weeks.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1992
"Will you still love me when I'm 88?" Face to face with Rachel Lachowicz's three mask-like versions of herself--at 28 (her current age), 58 and 88--a viewer muses on the changing way the world views a woman as she ages, and on the mythology of makeup in our culture. Somewhat unnervingly, these plaster faces--metamorphosing from taut-skinned expressionlessness to a lined and pouchy scowl--all are covered with the same tint, from the Chanel "poudre douce" line.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1992 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Talk about role reversal. For her first performance-art piece, Rachel Lachowicz dolled up two nude male models with cherry-red lipstick. She didn't apply it to their lips, however; she smeared it on their chests, buttocks, thighs and penises, then had them lie face-down on pristine white canvases, creating artworks from their body prints. "It was a little outrageous (but) lots of fun," said Lachowicz.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1990 | SHAUNA SNOW
FACES "I'm done trying to convince people of something," says artist Rachel Lachowicz, whose new work is on view at Santa Monica's Krygier/Landau Contemporary Art through Jan. 15. "Things aren't really going to change that much in my lifetime, so now I'm just looking at life rather than trying to change it." The object of Lachowicz's ire is the male classification of women, which she believes leads to the "ridiculous role playing" that comes with putting on makeup.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1989 | SUVAN GEER
Witty and perverse, Rachel Lachowicz transforms things into suggestive other things. She can turn a piece of T-shaped metal into a plunger for a nonexistent explosive charge. She can mount a graphite log on a wooden cart making a crude pencil caddy for giants on the run. Hers is a surreal vocabulary of odd anecdotes for things transformed by use. A library card catalogue becomes a process piece on traceability, leaking trails of fine sand when opened and closed.
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