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Rachel Ticotin

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1991 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Will Rollie Tyler never learn? When we first met Rollie (Bryan Brown), a Manhattan-based film industry special-effects expert in the popular "F/X," he let government agents talk him into faking a supposedly phony hit on a Mafia chieftain--and Rollie's girlfriend wound up dead. In the tense and splashy "FX2--The Deadly Art of Illusion" (citywide), five years have passed and he has left the movies to design a line of intricately mechanized toys.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1993 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rachel Ticotin seems to be everywhere this month. Not only does the 34-year-old actress have a juicy supporting role in the controversial Michael Douglas film "Falling Down," Ticotin also stars in the new NBC detective series "Crime and Punishment," which premieres its first of six episodes Wednesday at 10 p.m. "I keep saying everyone will be so sick of me," jokes Ticotin, who made her film debut as Paul Newman's drug-addicted lover in 1981's "Fort Apache, the Bronx."
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1993 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rachel Ticotin seems to be everywhere this month. Not only does the 34-year-old actress have a juicy supporting role in the controversial Michael Douglas film "Falling Down," Ticotin also stars in the new NBC detective series "Crime and Punishment," which premieres its first of six episodes Wednesday at 10 p.m. "I keep saying everyone will be so sick of me," jokes Ticotin, who made her film debut as Paul Newman's drug-addicted lover in 1981's "Fort Apache, the Bronx."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1991 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Will Rollie Tyler never learn? When we first met Rollie (Bryan Brown), a Manhattan-based film industry special-effects expert in the popular "F/X," he let government agents talk him into faking a supposedly phony hit on a Mafia chieftain--and Rollie's girlfriend wound up dead. In the tense and splashy "FX2--The Deadly Art of Illusion" (citywide), five years have passed and he has left the movies to design a line of intricately mechanized toys.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1993 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Court Recessed: "L.A. Law," a staple of NBC's Thursday night schedule since 1986, will go on hiatus in March as the network gives its 10 p.m. time slot to "Crime & Punishment." "L.A. Law" will return to its old time slot April 1, with the first of the season's remaining eight original episodes to be executive produced by William Finkelstein, who returns after working on ABC's divorce-lawyer drama, "Civil Wars."
NEWS
September 20, 1995 | BILL HIGGINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Scene: Monday's launch of Savoy's "Steal Big, Steal Little" at the Mann National in Westwood. Afterward, at the Armand Hammer Museum, was the season's first full-blown, red carpet, trees-dripping-in-lights premiere party with a lineup of Mexican and Italian buffets by Someone's in the Kitchen.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1991 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actor Andy Garcia, percussionist Tito Puente, singers Eydie Gorme and Celia Cruz and radio announcer Casey Kasem were among the winners Friday night at Nosotros' 21st annual Golden Eagle Awards, which recognize the achievement of Latinos in the entertainment industry. The awards honor performers in all areas of entertainment, with Cuban-born Garcia being named outstanding actor for his performances in films including "The Godfather, Part III," "The Untouchables" and "Internal Affairs."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2002 | MARK SACHS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In April 2000, producer Gregory Nava ("El Norte," "Selena") delivered a series pilot to CBS that promised to break new ground as the first TV drama built around a Latino cast. But what transpired in the ensuing months broke more hearts than ground, as support for "American Family" eroded amid network concerns that the story of an East L.A. family struggling with pressures both internal and external just didn't have the right stuff for the fall lineup.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1995 | JON MATSUMOTO
The Showtime movie "The Wharf Rat" transpires in a shadowy underworld occupied by career criminals and unethical cops. Indeed, corruption runs so rampant in this film's urban jungle that even the Police Department's Internal Affairs Division is in need of moral housecleaning. In the wake of the troubling and explosive Mark Fuhrman tapes, portions of "The Wharf Rat" can't help but take on added resonance.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2002 | LISA J. ADAMS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Since its debut on PBS in January, "American Family" has won praise as the first Latino drama on U.S. broadcast television. The first 13 episodes did well enough that PBS decided to pick up nine more, and Mexico's Televisa network has announced plans to air all of them in the fall. The series, set in East Los Angeles, follows life with the Gonzalezes, a Mexican American family with strong cultural and family ties south of the border.
NEWS
April 13, 2000
New West Symphony will present its concert version of Rossini's comic opera masterpiece "The Barber of Seville" in Oxnard and Thousand Oaks this weekend. The opera cast will feature baritone Nmon Ford-Livene as Figaro. Stage direction is by Daniel Helfgot of Opera San Jose. The New West Symphony, "Barber of Seville," Friday, 8 p.m., Oxnard Performing Arts Center, 800 Hobson Way; Saturday 8 p.m., Thousands Oaks Civic Arts Plaza Kavli Theatre, 2100 E. Thousand Oaks Blvd. $8-$55. 497-5800.
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