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Rachelle Chong

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2009 | By Michael Rothfeld
The leader of the state Senate on Tuesday rejected a controversial appointee of Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger who had been bidding for a second term on the commission that regulates state utilities. Aides to Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento) informed the governor's office that he would not hold a hearing to confirm Rachelle Chong. Chong, who has been severely criticized by consumer groups, was first appointed in 2006 and had been seeking a term that would have lasted through 2014.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2009 | By Michael Rothfeld
A state Senate committee voted unanimously Wednesday to confirm Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's choice to lead California's utility regulation agency through 2014. The 5-0 decision means that Michael Peevey is virtually assured of receiving the support of the full Senate and continuing as Public Utilities Commission president, a position he's held since 2002. Peevey, a former Southern California Edison executive, is married to state Sen. Carol Liu (D-La Cañada Flintridge). Peevey received praise from supporters and lawmakers for working to ensure the reliability of the state's electricity grid and promoting environmentally friendly sources of energy.
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BUSINESS
November 1, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
New Kids' Programs Rules Put in Doubt: A proposal to require the networks to air more children's educational programs is in danger after a regulator, whose support is considered vital, voiced doubts about the plan, backers and opponents said. Rachelle Chong, a member of the Federal Communications Commission, said she has questions about the need to require television stations to run at least three hours of educational programming a week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2009 | By Michael Rothfeld
The leader of the state Senate on Tuesday rejected a controversial appointee of Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger who had been bidding for a second term on the commission that regulates state utilities. Aides to Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento) informed the governor's office that he would not hold a hearing to confirm Rachelle Chong. Chong, who has been severely criticized by consumer groups, was first appointed in 2006 and had been seeking a term that would have lasted through 2014.
BUSINESS
January 12, 2006 | From Reuters
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Wednesday appointed Rachelle Chong, a former member of the Federal Communications Commission, to fill a vacancy on the California Public Utilities Commission. Chong, a Republican, has a background in telecommunications law and policy. She was a member of the FCC from 1994 to 1997, during which a major overhaul was implemented with the Telecommunications Act of 1996.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2009 | By Michael Rothfeld
A state Senate committee voted unanimously Wednesday to confirm Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's choice to lead California's utility regulation agency through 2014. The 5-0 decision means that Michael Peevey is virtually assured of receiving the support of the full Senate and continuing as Public Utilities Commission president, a position he's held since 2002. Peevey, a former Southern California Edison executive, is married to state Sen. Carol Liu (D-La Cañada Flintridge). Peevey received praise from supporters and lawmakers for working to ensure the reliability of the state's electricity grid and promoting environmentally friendly sources of energy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2007 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
A controversial member of the California Public Utilities Commission, serving on an interim basis, is set to win state Senate confirmation despite opposition from consumer groups. On Wednesday, the powerful Rules Committee sent the governor's nomination of Rachelle B. Chong of San Francisco to the full Senate for its expected approval today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2006 | Jordan Rau, Times Staff Writer
A long-standing dispute about the telecommunication industry's influence over state regulation in Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's tenure has erupted into a pitched fight for a pivotal seat on the Public Utilities Commission. Several consumer groups are trying to derail the confirmation of Rachelle Chong, Schwarzenegger's latest nominee to the five-member commission.
NEWS
March 16, 1994 | Associated Press
Susan Ness, an investment banker specializing in communications companies, was nominated Tuesday by President Clinton to be a member of the Federal Communications Commission. Ness, 45, a communications attorney, was nominated for a Democratic seat on the five-member commission. The seat became available in February when Commissioner Ervin Duggan left to become head of the Public Broadcasting Service.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1995 | JUBE SHIVER JR.
* Background: The Federal Communications Commission, an independent regulatory agency, was established by Congress 61 years ago. It is responsible for regulating all interstate and foreign communications transmitted by radio, TV, satellite, cable and by wired and wireless telephone. * Management: The agency is run by five commissioners who are appointed by the President to seven-year terms and confirmed by the Senate. The current commissioners are Reed E. Hundt, chairman, (Democrat); Jame H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2007 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
A controversial member of the California Public Utilities Commission, serving on an interim basis, is set to win state Senate confirmation despite opposition from consumer groups. On Wednesday, the powerful Rules Committee sent the governor's nomination of Rachelle B. Chong of San Francisco to the full Senate for its expected approval today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2006 | Jordan Rau, Times Staff Writer
A long-standing dispute about the telecommunication industry's influence over state regulation in Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's tenure has erupted into a pitched fight for a pivotal seat on the Public Utilities Commission. Several consumer groups are trying to derail the confirmation of Rachelle Chong, Schwarzenegger's latest nominee to the five-member commission.
BUSINESS
January 12, 2006 | From Reuters
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Wednesday appointed Rachelle Chong, a former member of the Federal Communications Commission, to fill a vacancy on the California Public Utilities Commission. Chong, a Republican, has a background in telecommunications law and policy. She was a member of the FCC from 1994 to 1997, during which a major overhaul was implemented with the Telecommunications Act of 1996.
BUSINESS
November 1, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
New Kids' Programs Rules Put in Doubt: A proposal to require the networks to air more children's educational programs is in danger after a regulator, whose support is considered vital, voiced doubts about the plan, backers and opponents said. Rachelle Chong, a member of the Federal Communications Commission, said she has questions about the need to require television stations to run at least three hours of educational programming a week.
BUSINESS
July 10, 1997 | From Reuters
Rebuffing President Clinton, a divided Federal Communications Commission on Wednesday blocked taking a first step toward regulating hard-liquor advertisements on radio and television. The commission voted 2 to 2 on opening a proposed inquiry into the controversial issue of hard-liquor broadcast advertising. A proposal needs three votes to pass the five-member commission, which currently has one vacancy.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1997 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's top broadcast regulator agreed Monday to delay until July a vote on whether the Federal Communications Commission should open an inquiry into liquor advertising on radio and television. FCC Chairman Reed Hundt said he removed the item from Thursday's agenda at the request of Commissioner Rachelle Chong. Chong and Commissioner James Quello have argued that the FCC does not have jurisdiction over liquor advertising.
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