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Racial Balance

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NEWS
January 14, 1990 | RICK HAMPSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The real estate agent told George Powell that the owner of the four-bedroom, two-bath house on which he had made a bid was taking it off the market. Powell, a Philip Morris executive with a wife and three children, was suspicious for two reasons: He is black and the owner of the house was dead. Welcome to the suburbs, Mr. Powell. George Powell was the exception--he fought back. He sued the real estate agent and a local open-housing group picketed the house.
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OPINION
March 2, 2008 | Swati Pandey
What do 17-year-olds know? Not a whole lot, according to a study released last week by Common Core, a nonpartisan research group. Responding to what it sees as an overemphasis on reading and math at the expense of a liberal arts education, the group asked 1,200 students basic history, literature and civics questions. They scored a D, cumulatively, with 1 in 10 answering that Adolf Hitler was a munitions manufacturer between the two world wars (rather than chancellor of Germany during World War II)
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MAGAZINE
November 6, 1988
"The Home Team" (by Michele Kort, Sept. 4) featured 16 Southern California Olympic athletes. Six of these young people are white, 10 are black, none are Oriental nor Latino. Obviously, an affirmative action program is needed to attain racial balance among our athletes. ROBERT S. ELLYN Calabasas
OPINION
June 11, 2006
In the June 6 story "Court to Revisit Race in Schools," a lawyer for the Pacific Legal Foundation in Sacramento -- which urged the court to hear appeals on voluntary integration in Louisville, Ky., and Seattle -- said: "They are teaching our kids that race still matters. If they can continue to do that, we will never get to a place where the country is colorblind." This is the old Southern argument I heard growing up in Louisville; the adage that integration will come on its own accord, the slow-but-sure approach -- while millions go without a decent education.
NEWS
September 20, 1992
I like the modern math used to justify the new high school in Malibu (Times, Sept. 13). While residents are concerned about the financial viability, it does not stop the progressives from opening up a school with 65 students from Malibu, importing 20 from Topanga to get some L.A. school funds for subsidies and then importing 40 minority children from Santa Monica. The Santa Monica children take the long bus ride the Malibu parents don't want their own children to be exposed to so that the school has a racial balance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2000
There is a second compelling reason to impanel a second grand jury (May 9-10). Any large organization (like a city, transit agency, school district or company) and any large fund (as administered by a city, transit agency, school district or company) is going to have problems. In and around Los Angeles we have many large organizations and many large funds (one of which is going to become larger as transportation dollars come from Sacramento). There is too much for one grand jury to look into.
NEWS
May 14, 1989
Attorneys in the 1974 Boston school desegregation case are seeking a court order to block a new student assignment plan that they fear could lead to a further exodus of white students from inner-city schools. The lawyers, Thomas Atkins and Robert Pressman, filed a motion with U.S. District Judge W. Arthur Garrity Jr., asking him to intervene to stop the student assignment plan. "As this plan is now drafted, it will result in rapid resegregation of the schools in minority neighborhoods," Atkins said.
NEWS
July 18, 1985
The Pasadena Unified School District will receive $1.4 million from the state as repayment for the cost of maintaining a voluntary desegregation program during the 1983-84 school year. The money is included in legislation authored by state Assemblyman John Vasconcellos (D-Santa Clara) and signed by the governor July 9. The bill reimburses several school districts for desegregation costs.
NEWS
November 20, 1986 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Board of Education voted this week to open a musical academy for 700 students at Hamilton High School and to relocate two other nearby magnet school programs under a plan to improve the racial balance in the Hamilton area and relieve overcrowding elsewhere.
OPINION
June 11, 2006
In the June 6 story "Court to Revisit Race in Schools," a lawyer for the Pacific Legal Foundation in Sacramento -- which urged the court to hear appeals on voluntary integration in Louisville, Ky., and Seattle -- said: "They are teaching our kids that race still matters. If they can continue to do that, we will never get to a place where the country is colorblind." This is the old Southern argument I heard growing up in Louisville; the adage that integration will come on its own accord, the slow-but-sure approach -- while millions go without a decent education.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2004 | Duke Helfand, Jean Merl and Joel Rubin, Times Staff Writers
Fifty years after the U.S. Supreme Court declared deliberately segregated schools unconstitutional, racial isolation is intensifying on California's public school campuses amid vast Latino immigration and a retreat from busing and other efforts to diversify enrollments. Nearly 1 million Latino and African American schoolchildren in California now attend highly segregated campuses with few if any white or Asian students -- more than triple the figure of isolated minorities from two decades ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2002 | VIVIAN LETRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Huntington Beach Union High School District will ask the state Supreme Court to decide the fate of its policy of denying student transfers in order to maintain racial balance in its schools. The legal case could clarify how public primary and secondary schools are affected by Proposition 209, the 1996 ballot initiative that banned consideration of race and ethnicity in public education, thus ending affirmative action.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2000
There is a second compelling reason to impanel a second grand jury (May 9-10). Any large organization (like a city, transit agency, school district or company) and any large fund (as administered by a city, transit agency, school district or company) is going to have problems. In and around Los Angeles we have many large organizations and many large funds (one of which is going to become larger as transportation dollars come from Sacramento). There is too much for one grand jury to look into.
NEWS
September 11, 1999 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
A court decision that helped launch the contentious era of forced school busing was nullified Friday with a federal judge's ruling that the Charlotte-Mecklenburg school district in North Carolina had done all it could to end segregation. Although the ruling by U.S. District Judge Robert Potter is not the first to declare a district officially desegregated, the case has been closely watched around the country because of what it symbolizes: the potential close of a chapter in American history.
REAL ESTATE
October 6, 1996 | LINDA BETH MOTHNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Linda Beth Mothner is a Los Angeles freelance writer
Miguel Martinez, 23, recalls trying to talk his mother, Maria Torres, out of buying a five-bedroom Spanish-style home in the South Bay city of Carson. But the 48-year-old longshorewoman, who already owned her Wilmington home free and clear and needed the tax deduction from a mortgage, had made up her mind.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1994 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles schools with too many open enrollment applications and not enough space geared up to hold lotteries today to determine which students will be allowed to attend the campuses of their choice this fall. The Los Angeles Unified School District schools--many in the west San Fernando Valley--will randomly draw students' names and create waiting lists for potential openings under the new state-ordered open enrollment program.
NEWS
January 25, 1987 | LEE HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
A $5-million claim alleging racial discrimination has been filed against the city by a black firefighter from Texas who was rejected when he applied for a job on the 36-person Lynwood Fire Department. The discrimination charge has spurred both a plan to put more minorities on the Fire Department and a squabble between Mayor Paul H. Richards and Councilman Robert Henning. Lynwood, which is about 40% black, has no black firefighters. There are three Latinos and one woman.
OPINION
March 2, 2008 | Swati Pandey
What do 17-year-olds know? Not a whole lot, according to a study released last week by Common Core, a nonpartisan research group. Responding to what it sees as an overemphasis on reading and math at the expense of a liberal arts education, the group asked 1,200 students basic history, literature and civics questions. They scored a D, cumulatively, with 1 in 10 answering that Adolf Hitler was a munitions manufacturer between the two world wars (rather than chancellor of Germany during World War II)
NEWS
June 17, 1993 | NED BOYER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A 2-year-old dispute between the San Gabriel and Alhambra school districts over who should educate San Gabriel high school students simmered down on one front Tuesday while it boiled over on another. The Alhambra Board of Education decided to sue the State Board of Education to overturn a 1992 election that permits San Gabriel to have its own high school.
NEWS
September 20, 1992
I like the modern math used to justify the new high school in Malibu (Times, Sept. 13). While residents are concerned about the financial viability, it does not stop the progressives from opening up a school with 65 students from Malibu, importing 20 from Topanga to get some L.A. school funds for subsidies and then importing 40 minority children from Santa Monica. The Santa Monica children take the long bus ride the Malibu parents don't want their own children to be exposed to so that the school has a racial balance.
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