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Racial Discrimination

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NEWS
April 19, 1988 | LARRY GORDON, Times Education Writer
In a speech that provoked angry rebuttals from administrators and some students, U.S. Secretary of Education William J. Bennett charged Monday that Stanford University's recent change in Western Culture studies was "an unfortunate capitulation to a campaign of pressure politics and intimidation." Bennett told a campus audience that protests by minority students scared the university into dropping a mandatory reading list of 15 classics from the course required for all freshmen.
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OPINION
January 29, 2014
Re "Fixing the Voting Rights Act," Editorial, Jan. 24 There isn't any legislation needed. The Supreme Court's decision last year was aimed at only one section of the Voting Rights Act; the rest remains in full force. As The Times recognizes, the Justice Department and civil rights groups are now using those other provisions to try to advance their agendas. All that's different is that lawyers have to prove racial discrimination before they can get court relief, which is the way every other civil rights law works.
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NEWS
September 2, 1989 | DAVID TREADWELL, Times Staff Writer
It is a neighborhood of small shops, corner delis and tidy houses and apartment buildings with statues of saints adorning front-yard gardens. On summer evenings, families lounge in aluminum lawn chairs and chat merrily with their neighbors, many speaking in their native Italian, as kids play freely in the quiet streets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
It's true that a federal judge on Tuesday tossed out the racial discrimination claims against Paula Deen in a lawsuit brought by a former restaurant employee. Does this mean that Deen has been unfairly maligned as a racist and that she will emerge from the harsh fog of judgment that has surrounded her, retaking her place in the sun as television's Queen of Butter and sought-after endorser of many cuisine-related products? Doubtful. U.S. District Court Judge William T. Moore, after all, did not rule on allegations by the former employee, Lisa Jackson, that Deen and her business partner brother, Earl “Bubba” Hiers, created or condoned a nightmare of an environment at their Savannah, Ga., restaurant.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
Twenty-four African American pilots and supervisors at United Air Lines filed a lawsuit Tuesday, accusing the airline of a pattern of discrimination that has kept them from being promoted. The suit, filed in U.S District Court in San Francisco, contends that all 24 employees have worked for United or Continental Airlines, which recently merged with United, for more than 14 years and have been illegally passed over for promotions because of their race. "We have endured a habitual, longstanding pattern of discriminatory behavior at the hands of United Air Lines," Terry Haynie, a United pilot said in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1993 | MIMI KO
Owners of the Leaky Tiki bar accused the City Council last week of racism in revoking their entertainment permit. "We will fight this in court," said Janet Escobosa, an owner of the bar. "Until three months ago, I ran the only Mexican bar in La Habra where you can listen to Mexican music and speak Spanish. (The City Council) is discriminating against us."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1988 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
On May 30, 1944--in the midst of World War II--U.S. Army Pvt. Alex F. Miranda stood before an American firing squad in England and spoke his last words. "Pray for me," the 20-year-old soldier from Santa Ana beseeched a chaplain. "And may God have a place for you in heaven." Then Pvt. Miranda, who had fatally shot his sleeping sergeant almost three months earlier, was felled by a volley from 10 rifle-bearing soldiers.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2012 | By Greg Braxton
A class-action lawsuit filed by two Nashville men who alleged that ABC's "The Bachelor" and "The Bachelorette" dating shows intentionally excluded people of color has been dismissed. Lawyers for Nathaniel Claybrooks, described as an "All-American football player" and Christopher Johnson, described as "an aspiring National Football League player," had claimed in U.S. District Court that both shows over the last 10 years and 23 combined seasons had never featured a person of color in the central role.
BUSINESS
July 6, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
The U.S. government sued Albertsons Inc., saying the supermarket chain failed to protect black and Latino employees from harassment since 1995. Albertsons didn't adequately respond to employee complaints about drawings of swastikas and nooses at its distribution center in Aurora, Colo., the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission said in a lawsuit. The company also discriminated against minorities when assigning jobs and enforcing disciplinary rules, the suit said.
NEWS
June 30, 1990 | BOB SECTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a town where beer is champagne and bratwurst is caviar, the plump, German luncheon link has become embroiled in a bizarre racial dispute that is sizzling hotter this summer than a backyard barbecue. The City Council Friday voted to censure Michael McGee, a flamboyant black alderman who has previously threatened urban guerrilla violence against whites, for his part in a product tampering scare last weekend.
OPINION
August 4, 2013
It has been less than six weeks since the Supreme Court struck down a key provision of the Voting Rights Act, the landmark law that for five decades has protected this country's most basic democratic right. But it is already clear that the decision was a disaster. Freed of the obligation to seek federal approval before making changes in their election practices, some states have moved to introduce or restore policies that will make it harder for racial minorities to vote or will dilute their political influence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2013 | By Stephen Ceasar
This post has been corrected. See the note at the bottom for details. Dr. Christian Head, a surgeon at UCLA's medical school, will receive $4.5 million to settle a racial discrimination lawsuit against the UC Board of Regents, the university system announced Thursday. The agreement settles the lawsuit , filed in April, which accused the university of failing to prevent discrimination, harassment and retaliation against Head. The head and neck surgeon alleged that he was retaliated against for filing complaints through normal channels and was denied teaching opportunities.
SPORTS
July 17, 2013 | By Bill Dwyre
   GULLANE, Scotland -- Politics and political correctness were the topic of the day at the British Open, where officials of the Royal and Ancient governing body were slapped around a bit by the media on the issue of playing this year's event at a place where women are not allowed to be members.      Muirfield Golf Club, establishing a membership in 1744, has no female members, although many female guest players. The issue, simlar to the one that the home of the Masters, Augusta National, wrestled with for years until admitting two women last year, was brought to a head when the Scotland First Minister announced that he would boycott the event at Muirfield because of the club's exclusionary policies.
OPINION
June 26, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Tuesday's Supreme Court decision striking down a key section of the Voting Rights Act won't bring back the worst excesses that inspired that landmark civil rights law. African Americans in the South seeking to register to vote don't need to fear that this represents a return to violence, harassment or humiliating literacy tests. But the unwise 5-4 decision will make it easier for state and local governments with a history of discriminating against minorities to engage in subtler forms of disenfranchisement.
NATIONAL
June 15, 2013 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court has devoted decades to giving meaning to the Constitution's promise of equality for all before the law. Now, as the court heads into the final two weeks of this year's term, the justices may be about to close one chapter of that long story even as they open a new one. The court is set to decide whether to pull back on 1960s-era remedies for racial discrimination that critics say have outlived their need. One case tests a race-based affirmative action policy at the University of Texas that gives an advantage to black and Latino students.
NATIONAL
February 27, 2013 | By David G. Savage and David Lauter, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The historic Voting Rights Act appeared to be in deep trouble Wednesday after the Supreme Court's conservative justices argued during a racially charged debate that targeting the South for special scrutiny was no longer fair. The unusually tense discussion split along ideological lines. Justices from the left and right took turns arguing the case - and arguing with one another over whether racism and racial discrimination remain problems. At one point, Justice Antonin Scalia referred to the law as a "perpetuation of racial entitlement," a phrase that irked Justice Sonia Sotomayor, who voiced strong objection earlier this week to a Texas prosecutor's focus on defendants' race.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1989 | From Associated Press
Bernard C. Duse Jr. never thought that being black posed any problems that he couldn't overcome. "I have always said whatever problems I will hit in that regard, I will overcome that, and I have always done that by simply working harder and putting my shoulder to the wheel . . . to work harder to overcome that," Duse said. His life seemed unlikely to prove him wrong, until January 1984, when he complained of racial discrimination at IBM, his employer of 14 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2000
Otto Rutherford, 89, a former leader of the Portland chapter of the NAACP who fought successfully in Oregon's state Legislature to outlaw discrimination in housing, restaurants and amusement parks. Born in Portland to one of the state's first black families, Rutherford and his wife, Verdell, led the Portland chapter of the National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People in 1953, when it confronted the Legislature with a bill to outlaw discrimination in public facilities in Oregon.
NATIONAL
February 27, 2013 | By David G. Savage and David Lauter
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court justices divided sharply along ideological lines Wednesday as they debated whether racial discrimination in voting remains a serious problem in the South, with conservative justices pushing toward striking down a key part of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Justice Antonin Scalia called the law “a perpetuation of a racial entitlement…. This is not the kind of question you can leave to Congress.” He was responding to U.S. Solicitor General Donald Verrilli Jr., who noted that the Senate voted unanimously in 2006 to extend the Voting Rights Act. But Scalia and his conservative colleagues showed hostility to one of the nation's landmark civil rights measures.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2012 | By Greg Braxton
A class-action lawsuit filed by two Nashville men who alleged that ABC's "The Bachelor" and "The Bachelorette" dating shows intentionally excluded people of color has been dismissed. Lawyers for Nathaniel Claybrooks, described as an "All-American football player" and Christopher Johnson, described as "an aspiring National Football League player," had claimed in U.S. District Court that both shows over the last 10 years and 23 combined seasons had never featured a person of color in the central role.
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