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Racial Discrimination South Africa

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June 30, 1989 | From United Press International
A congress of South Africa's ruling National Party endorsed a five-year plan of racial reform Thursday that zealously guards white-minority interests but also is intended to serve as the framework for power-sharing negotiations with the black majority. The program was under attack even before the end of the daylong congress. A spokeswoman for the outlawed African National Congress said a power-sharing proposal giving whites power of veto "doesn't meet our demands," while the right-wing Conservative Party called it a "sellout of whites in South Africa."
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NEWS
April 18, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The South African Rugby Football Union won a bitterly contested court case Friday against the black-led South African government when a judge ruled that an investigation of the organization was unjustified. Pretoria Supreme Court Justice William de Villiers gave no reasons for his decision to nullify an order by President Nelson Mandela to set up a rugby commission of inquiry.
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NEWS
April 18, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The South African Rugby Football Union won a bitterly contested court case Friday against the black-led South African government when a judge ruled that an investigation of the organization was unjustified. Pretoria Supreme Court Justice William de Villiers gave no reasons for his decision to nullify an order by President Nelson Mandela to set up a rugby commission of inquiry.
NEWS
June 30, 1989 | From United Press International
A congress of South Africa's ruling National Party endorsed a five-year plan of racial reform Thursday that zealously guards white-minority interests but also is intended to serve as the framework for power-sharing negotiations with the black majority. The program was under attack even before the end of the daylong congress. A spokeswoman for the outlawed African National Congress said a power-sharing proposal giving whites power of veto "doesn't meet our demands," while the right-wing Conservative Party called it a "sellout of whites in South Africa."
SPORTS
April 26, 1999 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lord Killanin, whose tenure as International Olympic Committee president was marked by politically charged boycotts and pressure for a growing role in the Olympic movement for women and for professional athletes, died Sunday. He was 84. Killanin, an English-Irish nobleman whose health had been failing for some time, died at his home in Dublin, Ireland, his family said. The cause of death was not disclosed. Killanin served as IOC president from 1972-80.
NEWS
September 10, 1986 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
California's landmark law mandating the divestiture of stock in companies operating in South Africa could be repealed by legislation recently passed by the Senate, congressional legal experts said Tuesday. While some lawmakers, including Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.), claim that Congress constitutionally cannot dictate state investment policies, the measure passed by the Senate on Aug.
NEWS
October 17, 1997 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James A. Michener, the extravagant storyteller who delivered whole states, whole nations--indeed, whole epochs--to an adoring international audience by wrapping historical fact in sweeping fiction, died Thursday. He was 90 and died at his home in Austin, Texas. The author of such blockbusters as "Hawaii," "Texas," "Centennial" and "Iberia"--which sold in incredible volume, despite their imposing length--Michener died of renal failure.
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