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Racial Discrimination United States

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NEWS
March 25, 1998 | From Associated Press
Responding to complaints that police target black people in car searches, the House passed a bill Tuesday requiring the Justice Department to determine the racial breakdown for routine traffic stops made by state and local police. "There are very few of us in this country who have not been stopped at one time for an alleged traffic violation that we thought constituted really simple racial harassment," said Rep. John Conyers Jr. of Michigan, who is black.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 12, 2000 | From Associated Press
Black leaders must remember the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. and "get into the trenches" to fight racial profiling and attacks on affirmative action, the Rev. Al Sharpton said Saturday at the finale of a voting rights commemoration. "We're here today to reconnect with the giants that brought us this far," he told about 500 people in the same downtown Montgomery church where King preached in the 1950s.
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NEWS
March 24, 1999 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House Democrats on Tuesday rebuffed a GOP-backed resolution condemning bigotry because it did not name the white supremacist Council of Conservative Citizens. Republican leaders had hoped to use the resolution to quell controversy over the council, which has hosted several Republican leaders at its meetings and has posted anti-black and anti-Semitic views on its Internet Web site.
NEWS
March 24, 1999 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House Democrats on Tuesday rebuffed a GOP-backed resolution condemning bigotry because it did not name the white supremacist Council of Conservative Citizens. Republican leaders had hoped to use the resolution to quell controversy over the council, which has hosted several Republican leaders at its meetings and has posted anti-black and anti-Semitic views on its Internet Web site.
NEWS
April 24, 1998 | From Associated Press
With three tractors and a mule, about 100 black farmers demonstrated outside the Agriculture Department on Thursday to underscore their frustration with the Clinton administration's failure to resolve a backlog of discrimination complaints. "We are American citizens, just as white citizens are," said Phillip Barker, who traveled from Oxford, N.C., to join the protest. "We deserve respect. When are we going to see some justice?"
NEWS
July 16, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Black farmers accused U.S. Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman of leading a racist agency that denies equal treatment in loan programs and allows their income to be "stolen" through land foreclosure. Glickman, in Atlanta to address the National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People, was taken aback by the harsh criticism. "Mr. Glickman and the racist USDA and racist Justice Department . . .
NEWS
June 28, 1998 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty years ago, when Virginia tobacco sold for $2.10 a pound, John Boyd's daddy made a fine living off the sweat of his brow and the crop in his field. "My father did well," said Boyd, a third-generation tobacco and soybean farmer in Mecklenburg County, Va. "My whole family lived off this farm. They built a home, kept up-to-date equipment and sent me and my brother off to college." For black farmers like Boyd's family, a productive farm meant respect and independence.
NEWS
October 10, 1998 | BILL MILLER, THE WASHINGTON POST
A federal judge ruled Friday that black farmers can pursue their highly publicized discrimination case against the Agriculture Department as a class action. The ruling by U.S. District Judge Paul L. Friedman means that the farmers can sue the government as a large group rather than pursuing cases individually.
NEWS
February 6, 1994 | The Washington Post
The Clinton Administration has launched an extensive inquiry to try to determine why minority employees in the federal government are fired at almost three times the rate of white workers. The government-wide inquiry will rely on analytical studies, focus groups and agency reviews to try to explain the disparity. One personnel specialist said he had never seen such a broad attack focused on such a specific personnel issue in his 30-year government career.
NEWS
March 12, 2000 | From Associated Press
Black leaders must remember the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. and "get into the trenches" to fight racial profiling and attacks on affirmative action, the Rev. Al Sharpton said Saturday at the finale of a voting rights commemoration. "We're here today to reconnect with the giants that brought us this far," he told about 500 people in the same downtown Montgomery church where King preached in the 1950s.
NEWS
October 10, 1998 | BILL MILLER, THE WASHINGTON POST
A federal judge ruled Friday that black farmers can pursue their highly publicized discrimination case against the Agriculture Department as a class action. The ruling by U.S. District Judge Paul L. Friedman means that the farmers can sue the government as a large group rather than pursuing cases individually.
NEWS
July 16, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Black farmers accused U.S. Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman of leading a racist agency that denies equal treatment in loan programs and allows their income to be "stolen" through land foreclosure. Glickman, in Atlanta to address the National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People, was taken aback by the harsh criticism. "Mr. Glickman and the racist USDA and racist Justice Department . . .
NEWS
June 28, 1998 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty years ago, when Virginia tobacco sold for $2.10 a pound, John Boyd's daddy made a fine living off the sweat of his brow and the crop in his field. "My father did well," said Boyd, a third-generation tobacco and soybean farmer in Mecklenburg County, Va. "My whole family lived off this farm. They built a home, kept up-to-date equipment and sent me and my brother off to college." For black farmers like Boyd's family, a productive farm meant respect and independence.
NEWS
April 24, 1998 | From Associated Press
With three tractors and a mule, about 100 black farmers demonstrated outside the Agriculture Department on Thursday to underscore their frustration with the Clinton administration's failure to resolve a backlog of discrimination complaints. "We are American citizens, just as white citizens are," said Phillip Barker, who traveled from Oxford, N.C., to join the protest. "We deserve respect. When are we going to see some justice?"
NEWS
March 25, 1998 | From Associated Press
Responding to complaints that police target black people in car searches, the House passed a bill Tuesday requiring the Justice Department to determine the racial breakdown for routine traffic stops made by state and local police. "There are very few of us in this country who have not been stopped at one time for an alleged traffic violation that we thought constituted really simple racial harassment," said Rep. John Conyers Jr. of Michigan, who is black.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1996 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Compton City Councilwoman Patricia Moore, who contends that she is a target of a government plot to destroy America's black leadership, has indicated that she might call Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan as a defense witness in her upcoming federal extortion trial. In a letter to government prosecutors Thursday, Moore's lawyer, Thomas A. Mesereau Jr., said the defense reserved the right to call Farrakhan as well as the Rev.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1996 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Compton City Councilwoman Patricia Moore, who contends that she is a target of a government plot to destroy America's black leadership, has indicated that she might call Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan as a defense witness in her upcoming federal extortion trial. In a letter to government prosecutors Thursday, Moore's lawyer, Thomas A. Mesereau Jr., said the defense reserved the right to call Farrakhan as well as the Rev.
NEWS
February 6, 1994 | The Washington Post
The Clinton Administration has launched an extensive inquiry to try to determine why minority employees in the federal government are fired at almost three times the rate of white workers. The government-wide inquiry will rely on analytical studies, focus groups and agency reviews to try to explain the disparity. One personnel specialist said he had never seen such a broad attack focused on such a specific personnel issue in his 30-year government career.
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