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June 15, 1997 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Urging Americans to undertake "a great national effort" to solve the nation's oldest problem, President Clinton on Saturday unveiled a long-awaited plan to narrow the divides of race and ethnicity in U.S. society and create "a more perfect union." "Of all the questions of discrimination and prejudice that still exist in our society, the most perplexing one is the oldest and, in some ways today, the newest--the problem of race," Clinton said during a commencement speech at UC San Diego.
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NEWS
June 15, 1997 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Urging Americans to undertake "a great national effort" to solve the nation's oldest problem, President Clinton on Saturday unveiled a long-awaited plan to narrow the divides of race and ethnicity in U.S. society and create "a more perfect union." "Of all the questions of discrimination and prejudice that still exist in our society, the most perplexing one is the oldest and, in some ways today, the newest--the problem of race," Clinton said during a commencement speech at UC San Diego.
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NEWS
June 15, 1997 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
With his long-awaited speech on race relations Saturday, President Clinton continued an odyssey toward convention on the most incendiary issue in American politics. Though Clinton has always spoken with great passion about the need for racial healing, at different points in his career he has prescribed different methods for achieving it.
NEWS
June 15, 1997 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
With his long-awaited speech on race relations Saturday, President Clinton continued an odyssey toward convention on the most incendiary issue in American politics. Though Clinton has always spoken with great passion about the need for racial healing, at different points in his career he has prescribed different methods for achieving it.
NEWS
September 10, 1985 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
President Pieter W. Botha declared Monday that his government will not be coerced into broader or faster reforms by the economic sanctions imposed by President Reagan. "South Africa's decisions will be made by South Africa's leaders, and the leaders of South Africa will themselves decide what is in our interests," Botha said in Pretoria, the capital. "Reform can only be retarded by outside attempts to interfere."
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