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Racial Equality

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WORLD
December 5, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon and Carol J. Williams
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Nelson Mandela, South Africa's beloved first black president and anti-apartheid hero, has died after suffering recurring lung infections that were the legacy of tuberculosis contracted in prison during his long fight against oppression, President Jacob Zuma said in a televised address late Thursday. He was 95. Although out of the limelight in recent years because of the infirmities of age, Mandela, or Madiba, the clan name by which he was affectionately known to many South Africans, remained a revered symbol of the fight he led against the nation's apartheid regime.
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OPINION
March 5, 2014 | David E. Hayes-Bautista
Thanks to a recent ruling from the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, high school students in the Morgan Hill Unified School District south of San Jose won't be allowed to wear American flag T-shirts on Cinco de Mayo. That's too bad. The flags of both the United States and Mexico belong in any celebration of Cinco de Mayo, because it is, at its heart, a Mexican American holiday. The ban was instituted a year after hostilities broke out at Live Oak High School during a Cinco de Mayo celebration.
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WORLD
November 21, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Brazil's president launched a national program to encourage racial equality, promising to grant land titles to descendants of runaway slaves and promote a system of quotas at the nation's universities.
WORLD
December 5, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon and Carol J. Williams
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Nelson Mandela, South Africa's beloved first black president and anti-apartheid hero, has died after suffering recurring lung infections that were the legacy of tuberculosis contracted in prison during his long fight against oppression, President Jacob Zuma said in a televised address late Thursday. He was 95. Although out of the limelight in recent years because of the infirmities of age, Mandela, or Madiba, the clan name by which he was affectionately known to many South Africans, remained a revered symbol of the fight he led against the nation's apartheid regime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2000
Re "The Tragic Abuse of King's Famous 34 Words," Opinion, Jan. 16: Michael Eric Dyson's argument against employing Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s vision of equality in his "I Have a Dream" speech for the dismantling of affirmative action by conservatives would have been better served by merely citing other of King's writings that supported affirmative action in the interests of realizing racial equality. This he does at the end of his article, but only after he has offered the dubious argument that "universality" was chiefly an ideological concept used by black civil rights advocates to advance black interests.
NEWS
August 18, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
Gen. Colin L. Powell, in his first public comments since he was chosen to head the Joint Chiefs of Staff last week, paid a moving tribute to the black servicemen and women who preceded him and said his job as the nation's most senior military officer will be "to defend the dream" of freedom and equality among races.
NEWS
February 29, 2004 | Michael Astor, Associated Press Writer
Black activists are trying a new weapon in their quest for racial equality in deeply divided Brazil: little white flowers. The white camellia has become a seal of approval that the Center for Articulation of Marginalized Peoples will award to stores, companies and schools that hire, promote and enroll black people. "We're going to show that no one profits from racism," said the group's leader, Ivanir dos Santos.
OPINION
August 29, 2013
Re "Stark gap in views on racial equality," Aug. 23 Surely no one is shocked that, according to a recent Pew Research Center report, a majority of whites in the U.S. believe racism is a non-issue. Asking whites about racism only reflects wishful thinking that the problem of race has gone away, but this warrantless belief has no objective value in the discussion of race. It puzzles me why there continue to be studies showing what we already know: that no person can intuit another's experience.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1985
Recently, Bahai Faith sponsored a conference whereby participants looked at racial equality with regard to the nation, in general, and San Diego, in particular. A significant point made at the conference was that racial equality is tied to respect. Ethnic or racial groups can only feel that they are valued in a society if they are treated in the same manner as others. Along these lines, many participants felt that one barrier to racial equality for blacks, locally, is the poor relationship between the Police Department and the black community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1991
In response to "One Nation, With Liberty and Justice for the Few," by Julianne Malveaux, Commentary, June 25: As a white male it is impossible to truly feel the pain and suffering that African-Americans endure living in the United States. Though, emotionally, I will never experience the effects of racism, intellectually I know it exists. The profound disgust that Julianne Malveaux has for our Pledge of Allegiance is enough to prove that. I cannot help but believe, however, that her hatred for "hypocritical" American ideals, as enunciated throughout the pledge, is misguided.
OPINION
August 29, 2013
Re "Stark gap in views on racial equality," Aug. 23 Surely no one is shocked that, according to a recent Pew Research Center report, a majority of whites in the U.S. believe racism is a non-issue. Asking whites about racism only reflects wishful thinking that the problem of race has gone away, but this warrantless belief has no objective value in the discussion of race. It puzzles me why there continue to be studies showing what we already know: that no person can intuit another's experience.
NATIONAL
August 22, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Nearly half a century after Martin Luther King Jr. described his dream that someday people would be judged not by their race but by their character, whites think a colorblind society is much closer to reality than blacks, according to a new survey from the Pew Research Center. The findings underscore the enduring chasm between the way white and black Americans perceive racism and its continued effects, as glaring gaps in wealth and education persist between the races. In a telephone survey of more than 2,200 adults this month, 44% of white respondents said the U.S. had a long way to go before achieving racial equality, compared with 79% of black respondents.
OPINION
July 20, 2013 | By Erin Aubry Kaplan
The timing of the two stories couldn't be better: the not-guilty verdict in the murder trial of George Zimmerman in the killing of black teenager Trayvon Martin, and a major reassessment of the state of black families in America done in advance of the 50th anniversary of the Moynihan Report. What do these two things have in common, beyond stoking racial controversy? At first glance, not much. The July 13 verdict was an Internet-fueled flash point for public outrage about the latest legal and moral injustice meted out to an unarmed young black man who was wrongly but fatally profiled as a criminal.
OPINION
August 7, 2010
Food for thought Re "Fields of shame," Opinion, Aug, 3 That Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has denied overtime pay to farmworkers after an eight-hour day flies in the face of justice for all workers — whether in an air-conditioned office, on the streets or in the fields. All workers are human beings who have the right to just wages and good working conditions. To deny those rights to those whose labor puts food on our tables in favor of profit to agribusiness is unconscionable.
MAGAZINE
February 19, 2006
This week in 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, authorizing the rounding up of Japanese Americans to protect the country "against espionage and against sabotage." Ten War Relocation Camps were built; ultimately, more than 100,000 people were interned in them. One of the camps was at Manzanar, and when Ansel Adams arrived with his cameras, he saw "a little city, well-governed and alive" in the shadow of Mt. Williamson.
OPINION
February 6, 2006
Re "And the cheat goes on," Feb. 2 I can't help thinking what a shame it is that Kanye West and his ilk fail to take into account that although it may boost their bottom line, every "and ain't I a nigga?" speech they make impedes the march toward racial equality. HEATHER TARNOWSKI Minneapolis Jonah Goldberg's column -- bent on degrading hip-hop, Kanye West's genius and popular music activism -- brought your Op-Ed pages to a new and amazing low. He began by admitting he knows nothing about contemporary hip-hop, and though his intent may not have been racist, it came off that way to an astonishing degree.
NEWS
May 14, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, Kraft is Times bureau chief in Johannesburg, South Africa.
Only a few hours after the Los Angeles jury returned its verdicts against four white police officers accused of beating a black man, a white judge in South Africa was sentencing a white policeman to death for murdering 11 blacks. It would have been easy to jump to the conclusion that South Africa was making rapid progress toward racial equality while one of its loudest critics, the United States, was taking a leap backward.
OPINION
May 30, 1993
Woo's continuing thinly disguised characterization of Riordan as a racist is itself a most reprehensible form of racism. The charge is both blatantly false and a transparent rejection of furtherance of tolerance, mutual respect of differences, and equality of opportunity in favor of personal partisan political advantage. I speak to the falsity of Woo's charge from long personal experience. I recruited Dick Riordan, a young associate at O'Melveny & Meyers, into the firm of Thompson, Waters & Moss.
BOOKS
May 16, 2004 | Edward Lazarus, Edward Lazarus, a lawyer in private practice, is the author of "Closed Chambers: The Rise, Fall, and Future of the Modern Supreme Court."
America changed on May 17, 1954. On that day, 50 years ago, Chief Justice Earl Warren announced the Supreme Court's unanimous decision in Brown vs. Board of Education. As a legal matter, the decision declared segregation in public schools unconstitutional and disavowed the doctrine permitting "separate but equal" treatment of blacks and whites.
NEWS
February 29, 2004 | Michael Astor, Associated Press Writer
Black activists are trying a new weapon in their quest for racial equality in deeply divided Brazil: little white flowers. The white camellia has become a seal of approval that the Center for Articulation of Marginalized Peoples will award to stores, companies and schools that hire, promote and enroll black people. "We're going to show that no one profits from racism," said the group's leader, Ivanir dos Santos.
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